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Carmen Drahl

Popular Science  - 
 
Blood clots are a big issue in hospitals, particularly when it comes to medical devices such as stents. Many teams are working toward #materials that repel blood to prevent clot formation in the first place. I've explained how these materials work in the context of a new study. http://www.forbes.com/sites/carmendrahl/2017/01/23/meet-the-newest-blood-repelling-material-designed-for-medical-implants/#7294593b701c #medicaldevices
Why titanium with a twist could help doctors prevent dangerous blood clots after, for example, getting a stent.
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Anthropic Digitalmentalist

Ask the Community  - 
 
I have a question regarding a term used in science. And that is the electromagnetic force. Which i belief binds the nucleus of an atom to the electrons.
However the science i am more of an expert on is ELECTRONICS. I have an amateur radio license. And in this field we are taught that electromagnetism is large coil or coils that if you put a DC voltage it will create a magnet.

But electromagnetic waves involves an oscillator that creates high frequency osculations where the electrons are moving back and forth and when fed to the correct size antenna that antenna being usually a half wave meaning the antenna had to be 1/2 the size as the wave length of the radio frequency.
Also even a low frequency can propagate electromagnetic waves as long as the antenna is the right size.

having said all of that . so you know what i have learned ,

How can an electromagnetic force be created between an atomic nucleus and an electron if you need electrons in the first place to call it electromagnetic.
Could the term electromagnetic force in quantum mechanics refer to the actual magnetic pull between the nucleus and the atom ? 
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Massimo Luciani

Popular Science  - 
 
In recent days at the 25th Plant and Animal Genome Conference held in San Diego the details of the sequencing of the DNA of arabica coffee - species Coffea arabica - were presented. Among the species of coffee it's the dominant one making up about 70% of the drink's production. A team of researchers at the University of California, Davis (UC Davis) made the first public sequencing in order to contribute to improving its quality and develop varieties adapted to climate change.

A blog about technologies, science, books and other stuff, especially science fiction
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David Fowler

Popular Science  - 
 
Finally got some decent airtime with my hovering magnet bet. The challenge was to beat 11 seconds. We got 1 minute.

https://youtu.be/zwW9rQVBi8c

This was done by surrounding the levitating magnet in a copper ring. Within this ring eddy currents are produced as the levitating magnet moves. These currents produce their own magnetic fields that repel the magnets movements. The result is that the copper ring significantly damp the magnets movement and makes the system controllable by hand...
... it's actually a very fun game! :)
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Scivit

Life  - 
 
Greenhouse gas saving potentials in agriculture

Agriculture is responsible for a good part of human-caused greenhouse gas production. Reducing the amount of CO2, CH4 and N2O produced in agriculture will be crucial for climate change mitigation efforts (see also Wollenberg et al., Global Change Biology (2016) 22, 3859–3864). To identify production areas and practices of particular potential for reduction, Carlson and colleagues set up a global inventory of food production intensity (how much greenhouse gas is produced per kilokalorie food?). They reached such an inventory by combining high-resolution satellite data with models describing greenhouse gas and food production by various agricultural practices. Their approach is exclusively focused on crop production, excluding for example emissions from livestock production, from deforestation or from fertilizer production.
(Carlson et al., Nature Climate Change 7, 63 - 68)

For the whole story go to http://www.scivit.de/lang/archive/1293

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Kevin Clift

Popular Science  - 
 
 
Pound Coin

I remember when the odd-looking and odd-sided 20p and 50p coins were first introduced to the UK with decimalisation in 1971, and the questions that were raised at the time, about not being round and whether or not they would work in money-counting machines. They did – because Geometry!

Now someone, possibly a politician, has decided on a new coin with even more sides and an even number of them to boot. We will have to wait until March to see how well they will work in money-counting machines that rely on gravity and coin rolling since these new Pound Coins won't have a constant width.

So what's the problem? One feature of the new coin is that it's twelve-sided, rather than round. It's not the first non-round coin in circulation — 20p and 50p coins are seven-sided — but it'll be the first with a variable width. This means that it won't roll as well as other coins, a fact that some people fear will cause problems in cash handling equipment. The trouble is that twelve is even while seven is odd.

More here (Maths Plus article): https://goo.gl/nCiWMK

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The government acknowledges that a shaped coin may present a challenge to existing coin lock mechanisms configured to accept the current £1 coin only, and so will continue to engage with manufacturers in order to mitigate potential disruption. However, responses to the consultation indicate that the long lead-in time means that upgrading should be possible at a modest cost (and manufacturers may choose to offer this as a complementary or routine service). The consultation process also highlighted a number of alternative and innovative solutions currently in the marketplace for coin lock mechanisms, many of which have been driven by the retail and leisure sectors.

More here (Govt. response (pdf)): https://goo.gl/AhbPDM

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Find out how vending machines identify and sort coins in this clip from The Science Channel's "Deconstructed."

Video (YT -3 mins.): https://goo.gl/0J8AAC

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The New Pound Coin: https://goo.gl/XSXhTk

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The new 12-sided £1 coin. Arriving 28th March 2017. The pound won’t be round for much longer.

The New Pound Coin (YT ~30 secs.): https://goo.gl/5mluxL


Image: Royal Mint https://goo.gl/FP3w0H








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Adam Gilbert

Ask the Community  - 
 
Well i read this article and to clarify my ideas i searched for such articles and i found a TED talk with the same motive. I think that the development or evolution of AI is not just restricted to engineers but it also involves Sociologists and psychologists as our main aim is to make AI more lifelike. Let me know what you think about after reading this.
We don't stand on a peak of intelligence, or anywhere near it, likely. And this really is the crucial insight. This is what makes our situation so uncertain, and this is what makes our instincts about risk so unreliable. Supp...
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Massimo Luciani

Popular Science  - 
 
An article published in the journal "Geophysical Research Letters" - it's paywalled, sorry! - describes a research on the climate consequences of the impact caused by the large asteroid that struck the Earth about 66 million years ago. A team of researchers of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) created computer models to simulate these events and concluded that the atmospheric dispersion of sulfuric acid droplets may have darkened the planet's skies resulting in the surface cooling.

A blog about technologies, science, books and other stuff, especially science fiction
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Can literature significantly enhance empathy? Recent research published in the journal Science throws light on this question. For each age level, a list of books that are particularly useful for fostering empathy is provided. http://www.frominsultstorespect.com/2017/01/18/developing-empathy-through-literature/
Welcome to From Insults to Respect. Empathy, as we have been lately discussing (see HERE and HERE), is crucial for being respected by your friends, coworkers, and community. And fostering empathy i…
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Anthropic Digitalmentalist

Ask the Community  - 
 
I have some questions regarding the wave particle duality of subatomic particles.

i have been doing a lot of research and watching some good science YouTube videos about this subject.

However what i find to be the most confusing is the actual definition of the wave function.
The wave function seems to be either a literal wave as apposed to mass or as some articles say the wave function is is only a mathematical representation of the probability of where one can find a subatomic particle. if observed. .
So the confusion still lies in the question of whether a subatomic particle like an electron exists literally as either a wave or a particle ?

Lets take the double slit experiment. Some articles state that this experiment shows that particles can break down into a waves when going through the double slit While others state that the wave seen on the rear detector only represents the likelihood of where the electrons will end up.

Like most of the "wave " is in the middle then it decreases as they radiate out.
Some say that this just means that the most likely place one finds that electrons hitting the back is in the middle and the least likely is on either opposite sides.

Can some one clear up this apparent misunderstanding? 
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Life may have emerged not once, but many times on Earth
Far from being a miracle that happened just once in 4 billion years, life's beginnings could have been so commonplace that it began many times over

Read the full article on the non-paywall version:
http://www.proxywhore.com/invboard/index.php?/topic/328574-life-may-have-emerged-not-once-but-many-times-on-earth/

#Biology   #Astrobiology   #Life   #LifeScience   #Biogenesis  
Life may have emerged not once, but many times on Earth
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About this community

Science on Google+ is a community moderated by scientists, for all people interested in science, both professionals and the general public. The primary goal of this community is to bring real scientists to the public, for science outreach. A secondary and long-term goal is to create an environment that fosters interdisciplinary collaborations; thus, enabling and promoting cloud collaboration between scientists. See Guidelines and Rules section for additional details.

Kevin Clift

Popular Science  - 
 
 
Skeletal Holes

With a beautifully regular but perhaps slightly scary pattern reminiscent of a glow-in-the dark skeleton suit, someone or something is damaging the bark of this tree. Reddit user u/babyjizzelkc913 wanted to know who or what could possibly be responsible, and was soon told by u/Stargazer-G about a special type of woodpecker aptly-named a Sapsucker!

Sapsuckers having a cunning multi-course meal plan involving carbs and protein. They drill wells into the bark of a series of living trees, scarfing-up bits of the cambium and then busily fly from tree to tree slurping up both the sweet sap, as it emerges from their carvings, and the insects that the sap attracts.

Drills tiny holes in tree bark, usually in neatly spaced rows, and then returns to them periodically to feed on the sap that oozes out. Also eats bits of cambium and other tree tissues, as well as insects that are attracted to the sap. Besides drilling sap wells, also gleans insects from tree trunks in more typical woodpecker fashion, and sallies out to catch insects in the air. Berries and fruits are eaten at all seasons, and birds may concentrate in fruiting wild trees in winter.

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More here: https://goo.gl/y0umXa

Image: r/babyjizzelkc913 https://goo.gl/rxHv3L
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Bitesz. com

Popular Science  - 
 
 
The Milky Way's Stolen Stars - SpaceTime with Stuart Gary for all the latest in space science news...

#astronomy #space #science #technology #news 
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Scivit

Life  - 
 
Transcriptomics does have some significance after all...

It is considerably easier to determine shifts in transcript levels when compared to shifts in protein levels. But how significant are such shifts? Transcripts are only units of information, they have hardly any direct effects. Can we deduce changes on the protein levels from shifts in transcript levels?

(Edfors et al., Molecular Systems Biology 12: 883ff)

Continue reading at http://www.scivit.de/lang/archive/1229
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Kevin Clift

Popular Science  - 
 
 
Martian Yardangs
by +Lori Fenton

I can imagine a science fiction story beginning when the Martian lander is blown off course, with limited fuel remaining, and heading for these brutally cleaved Martian Yardangs!

I suggest that you dig out your 3D glasses (the Blue/Red species) and head for the image link below to see what I mean.

Click on more here for a few more words and references from your expert +Lori Fenton

A Piece of Mars: Get out your 3D blue/red glasses (or look here for a 2D version if you can’t find them). This is a 3.2×1.8 km (2×1.13 mi) scene showing dark dunes carving lanes 50-70 m (165-230 ft) deep into a stack of brighter sedimentary layers. Over time, the sand wears down the rock into yardangs, the elongated remnants of rock the sand didn’t manage to reach.

More here: https://goo.gl/KmLVyH

Yardang (Wikip): https://goo.gl/VOjRAv

Image: https://goo.gl/hSzNzS
Bigger pic and set-up for blue red 3D glasses.
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Derick Lila

Popular Science  - 
 
A cathode containing nanoparticles made from cobalt, cobalt oxide and a carbon-based outer shell improved the performance of a zinc-air battery.

Zinc-air batteries are cheap, have a high energy density, and last for a very long time. Their use of a water-based electrolyte makes them safer than other batteries, so they’re often found in medical applications, such as hearing aids and heart monitoring devices.

The battery’s negative electrode contains zinc metal, which gives up electrons when it reacts with hydroxide ions in the electrolyte . Those electrons generate a current as they flow to the positive electrode, where they react with oxygen from the air to produce more hydroxide ions.

Read more: 
A breath of fresh air: Improving zinc-air batteries
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Scivit

Life  - 
 
Structure and function of a protein complex facilitating the final steps in mRNA export from the nucleus

mRNA is exported from the nucleus in complex with proteins; the last step of export consists of remodeling these complexes on the cytoplasmic side of nuclear pores.

(Fernandez-Martinez et al., Cell 167, 1215 – 1228)

Continue reading at http://www.scivit.de/lang/archive/1225
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Bell Beaker

Popular Science  - 
 
Is the decline of traditional marriage in Iceland causing a reversal of inherited traits associated with cognitive ability?
This is a very important study which (if replicated in other countries, with more complex demography, less complete genealogy, but much la...
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Lindsey Hammonds

Ask the Community  - 
 
One of my science teachers is beginning her unit on topography and our school uses Chromebooks. As far as we can tell Google Earth will not work on our Chromebooks, so does anyone have any suggestions for good topography maps specifically satellite images to be used in this lesson? Any apps or websites that are recommended?
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Tiny atmospheric particles called ‘aerosols’ play an important role in climate, air quality and health. Recent research provides new molecular-level insights into how a compound emitted in large quantities by pine trees helps form new atmospheric organic aerosols. The findings reveal key differences in how an important oxidation product of the compound forms clusters with various natural and industrial solvents found in the atmosphere. This information could improve the accuracy of models that simulate the effect of organic aerosols on climate and air quality. Read more at https://goo.gl/TOF84c.

+Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) 
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