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Jonah Miller
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​​​Physical  - 
 
Climate science is reliable. Here's why.

If we can't predict the weather next month how can we predict climate change?

As this post describes, the answer is hidden in chaos theory.

The science is definitive. Global average temperatures are getting warmer and this is caused by human activity.

EDIT: there are some great comments by a real life climate scientist on the original post. So check that out.
 
If we can't predict the weather never month how can we predict climate change?

The answer is hidden in chaos theory.

This is a common misconception about how climate models work and this post is inspired by a question in the +Science on Google+​ community.

The climate is a so-called "chaotic system." See:
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaos_theory

One simple example of a chaotic system is the Lorentz attractor:
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lorenz_system

In a chaotic system, the behaviour of the system at any given time is very hard to understand. This is why we can't predict the weather very well.

But look at the movie of the Lorentz attractor below. Notice anything?

The particle moves all over the place. The motion is very hard to predict. But it's usual or average position is predictable! The particle is usually along those curves!

This is typical of chaotic systems and the climate is the same way. We can't predict the weather next week. But we can predict the general behavior of the average weather over many years. And this is why you should trust predictions about climate change. See:
http://climatechangeconnection.org/science/how-can-we-predict-climate/
http://www.skepticalscience.com/weather-forecasts-vs-climate-models-predictions.htm
http://www.climatecentral.org/library/faqs/if_we_cant_predict_weather_two_weeks_ahead_how_can_we_predict_climate
http://science.howstuffworks.com/nature/climate-weather/atmospheric/scientists-predict-weather.htm
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r big
 
+Dwayne Connolly there would be no way to raise your taxes if they wanted you to believe in global cooling, dame, lower the cost of co2, hell no man, it's heating up! Taxe the crap out of everything, before the cooling!
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Aouadi Ahmed

Popular Science  - 
small blue-ringed octopus live in the deep oceans of Australia, New guinea , indonesia and Philipppines it'sworthremembering tnat its venom can
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A self-powered waste water treatment plant using microbes has just passed its biggest test, bringing household-level water recycling a step closer
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r big's profile photoClara Listensprechen's profile photo
7 comments
 
+Mark Abraham
It is if you have enough land to do it on. Look at the pic with this article. That ain't no back yard project either.
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Phil Kallahar

Ask the Community  - 
 
 
Admitting ones ignorance
Is the first step to wisdom

#science
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4 comments
 
+Ann Tuckley This is a science community. This isn't the place for your religious beliefs, even if the post itself is garbage.
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Fabiana Bueno

Popular Science  - 
 
 Neuroplastins are essential for learning and memory. Retrograde amnesia after an associative learning task can be induced by ablation of the neuroplastin gene. The inducible neuroplastin-deficient mouse model provides a new and unique means to analyze the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying retrograde amnesia and memory.
 
#Neuroplastins   #Neurobiology #News
Erasing unpleasant memories with a genetic switch
Deactivating one single gene is enough to erase associative memories . Using single-photon emission computed tomography imaging in awake mice,  identified brain structures activated during memory recall
Researchers from KU Leuven and the Leibniz Institute for Neurobiology have now shown that some memories can also be erased when one particular gene is switched off.
The team trained mice that had been genetically modified in one single gene: NPTN. This gene, which is investigated by only a few groups in the world, is very important for brain plasticity. In humans, changes in the regulation of the NPTN gene have recently been linked to decreased intellectual abilities and schizophrenia.
In the reported study, the mice were trained to move from one side of a box to the other as soon as a lamp lights up, thus avoiding a foot stimulus. This learning process is called associative learning. Its most famous example is Pavlov’s dog: conditioned to associate the sound of a bell with getting food, the dog starts salivating whenever it hears a bell.
When the scientists switched off the NPTN gene after conditioning, the mice were no longer able to perform the task properly. In other words, they showed learning and memory deficits that were specifically related to associative learning. The control mice with the NPTN gene switched on, by contrast, could still do the task perfectly.
Professor Detlef Balschun from the KU Leuven Laboratory for Biological Psychology: “We were amazed to find that deactivating one single gene is enough to erase associative memories formed before or during the learning trials. Switching off the NPTN gene has an impact on the behaviour of the mice, because it interferes with the communication between their brain cells.”
By measuring the electrical signals in the brain, the KU Leuven team discovered clear deficits in the cellular mechanism used to store memories. These changes are even visible at the level of individual brain cells, as postdoctoral researcher Victor Sabanov was able to show.
“This is still basic research,” Balschun adds. “We still need further research to show whether NPTN also plays a role in other forms of learning.” read more: https://www.kuleuven.be/english/news/2016/erasing-unpleasant-memories-with-a-genetic-switch
- pdf article: http://www.biologicalpsychiatryjournal.com/article/S0006-3223(16)32277-6/pdf
- image from: http://blogs.cardiff.ac.uk/acerringtonlab/research-techniques/
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BBSRC

Life  - 
 
Scientists have taken another crucial step towards understanding how plants initiate flowering.

This new development uncovers a previously unidentified step in the process of vernalisation, which links an important gene responsible for flowering time to the proteins that regulate it.

This new finding, made by scientists at the John Innes Centre, could contribute towards the development of new varieties of crops adapted to produce the food we need in a changing climate.

This research was funded by BBSRC and a European Research Council Advanced Investigator Grant.

See full press release here: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/news/fundamental-bioscience/2016/160729-pr-understanding-switch-that-triggers-flowering-in-plants/

Paper: Arabidopsis transcriptional repressor VAL1 triggers Polycomb silencing at FLC during vernalization
http://science.sciencemag.org/content/353/6298/485

Investing in world-class bioscience research and training on behalf of the UK public.
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Kevin Clift

Popular Science  - 
 
 
Beatrix Potter Anniversary

Mycologist, scientific illustrator, conservationist, and yes, writer and illustrator, Beatrix Potter, was born on this day 150 years ago (1866/07/28).

Genius would – eventually – out, but its passage was not easy. Through force of will, she escaped the narrowness of Victorian daughterhood, the polite world of needlework and simpering over teacups that had always bored her. Potter’s life became instead a series of self-fashionings: amateur scientist; author and illustrator; farmer, landowner and conservationist. As much as any of her stories, Beatrix Potter was her own creation.

But her ambition was quite at odds with that of her conventional, snobbish parents. Potter was born – 150 years ago this week – in a large, newly built house not far from the Victoria and Albert Museum. Both her parents had inherited cotton-milling fortunes from their self-made fathers, but Rupert and Helen Potter – socially ambitious – were keen not to betray even a trace of the entrepreneurialism that had made their fathers so rich.

More here: http://goo.gl/PBj0Ci

Related posts: https://goo.gl/8cgeHn https://goo.gl/4cZzrw

Image: https://goo.gl/wXtOCZ
Hill Top Farm
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There's more here inc. a video +ali a     :https://goo.gl/sxqaWn
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Fabiana Bueno

Popular Science  - 
 
 A handful of large studies of cancer risk factors have found that working the night shift, as nearly 15 percent of Americans do, boosts the chances of developing cancer. MIT biologists have now found a link that may explain this heightened risk.http://news.mit.edu/2016/night-shift-cancer-risk-0728
 
New study reveals a link between circadian clock disruption and tumor growth
 In humans and most other organisms, a circadian clock governed by light regulates the timing of key aspects of human physiology, by controlling cellular activities such as metabolism and division.

read the article here:
http://news.mit.edu/2016/night-shift-cancer-risk-0728
New study reveals a link between circadian clock disruption and tumor growth.
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Lou Flores

Popular Science  - 
 
Stratford Festival, Ontario 2016
The Forum
“The Challenge of Science”

So, these two physicists and a philosopher walk on stage. This shaggy dog story is only for those who know the difference between a quantum and a quark. Today at The Studio we were conducted into the realm of our current understanding of physics, the cosmological constant, and the challenge of science today. On the panel was Neil Turok, former professor at Cambridge and Princeton and now director of the Perimeter Institute in Theoretical Physics; Margaret Wertheim, science writer and media commentator with a talented background in pure and applied mathematical constructs; and Mark Kingwell, author, professor, and associate chair of philosophy at the University of Toronto.
We discovered that as science reflects the nature of society that the state of such areas as mathematics and physics may be suffering. There is evidence of a level of stagnation in the field of new research that is composed of an elite few and most of those are white males. There is a need to expand our knowledge by broadening the base to include additional women and people of color. What is required are more minds working on the issues of science. Notice that it took 100 years for Black Holes to be substantiated. It took 60 years to create the methodologies to prove the existence of Higgs boson. Theories it would seem require a good deal of effort not only to formulate, but also to verify.
It was posited that we seem to know a great deal about the miniscule (subatomic structures) and the very large (cosmological content); however, we know less about the “middle zone” where humanity resides. For example, how does life work; what is consciousness; what is the nature of human psychology; and how do societies relate to one another.
We look to science to create profound ideas and new inventions. It is clear that science has overtaken religion as our means of explaining the world. Yet, it would seem impossible to ask science to explain such entities as beauty, morality, altruism, or selfishness. We also notice that science is based upon data and observation, but that we often take such information and “bend” it for our uses in a form of political “truthiness.” Where hard science is about reason and rationality the “softer” sciences (sociology and psychology for example) are relying upon empirical data and mathematical formulae to justify their studies. What we were left with is that we can teach science and math, but we how do we endow wisdom or the moral endeavors that fortify society.
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Robin Kirkpatrick

Popular Science  - 
 
Wow the researchers only had to increase the pasteurizing temperature by 10 deg C for 1 second to kill enough bacteria to have the milk last up to ten weeks. Simple and effective - nice innovation!

Lets see how quickly the best before dates start to change...
Fans won't have to cry over spoilt milk soon, scientists announce the development of a new technique that can keep it unspoilt for up to nine weeks.
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Paul Engle

Popular Science  - 
 
Removing green tint of iron contamination from glass with manganese: a clever trick http://www.conciatore.org/20…/…/decolorization-of-glass.html
Roman blown-glass cinerary urn, c1-3AD National Archaeological Museum of Spain . Photo by Luis García, Courtesy of Wikimedia ‪#‎histSTM‬ ‪#‎glass‬
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2 comments
 
Beautiful piece of early glassware. 
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About this community

Science on Google+ is a community moderated by scientists, for all people interested in science, both professionals and the general public. The primary goal of this community is to bring real scientists to the public, for science outreach. A secondary and long-term goal is to create an environment that fosters interdisciplinary collaborations; thus, enabling and promoting cloud collaboration between scientists. See Guidelines and Rules section for additional details.

Benjamin Yule

​​​Physical  - 
 
Makes you look at Salt and Pepper in a whole new way. Things under a microscope blow my mind!
 
Get up close and personal with Salt and Pepper. Looks awesome when under a microscope :)
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2 comments
 
Marshmallows and bark.
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AstroCamp

Popular Science  - 
 
"Juno arrived at Jupiter on July 4, firing its main rocket engine as planned for 35 minutes. The flawless maneuver allowed Jupiter's gravity to capture the solar powered spacecraft into the first of two 53.4-day-long orbits, referred to as capture orbits. Following the capture orbits, Juno will fire its engine once more to shorten its orbital period to 14 days and begin its science mission.

But before that happens, on Aug. 27, Juno must finish its first lap around Jupiter, with a finish line that represents the mission's closest pass over the gas giant. During the encounter, Juno will skim past Jupiter at a mere 2,600 miles (4,200 kilometers) above the cloud tops."
 
Five years after departing Earth, and a month after slipping into orbit around Jupiter, our Juno spacecraft will begin falling back toward the planet on July 31 for another pass, this time with its scientific eyes wide open. More: http://go.nasa.gov/2aAXqOx
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Vivax Solutions

​​​Physical  - 
 
Speed Distribution of Molecules in an Ideal Gas
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A long-lived part of nuclear waste, it takes more than 210,000 years for half of any amount of technetium to decay away. It is also able to migrate, either moving through groundwater or becoming a gas when heated. Heat is an issue because technetium-containing waste and special chemicals are heated to yield solid glass logs for long-term storage. Scientists would prefer the technetium stay in the logs. Researchers devised a way to retain more technetium by adding cobalt. Mixed with an iron oxide, the cobalt helps stabilize technetium. The result? The modified glass marks a 50 to 60 percent increase in the amount of technetium held over baseline glass formulas. Learn more at http://goo.gl/nr0ayv. 
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Bad crap !!!!!!!!!!!
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Paul Engle

Popular Science  - 
 
Purpurine
The first documented uses of purpurine in objects of art were five entries of the Imperial Glassworks at the Paris Exposition Universelle in 1867, for which the glassworks was awarded gold medal status. “After Bonafede's death in 1878, purpurine continued to be made at the factory under the direction of the chief chemist, S. P. Petuchov.”

Read more: http://www.conciatore.org/2016/07/faberge-and-purpurine.html
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Garron Longfield's profile photo
 
h-m-m I must be in the history community. Should I click on the link. No I think not. I will continue to search for the science community. :-)))))))))))))))
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Benjamin Yule

Popular Science  - 
 
Dental Floss under a microscope :D Looks crazy!
 
Do you floss every day? This is what floss looks like when under a microscope. #microscope   #floss   #Dental #magnifier  
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10 comments
 
+Chris Francosky Maybe you could ask the retired scientist who took the photo :p And yes it is used floss :) photo by Steve Gschmeissner
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The secrets of blue-green algae’s rapid growth characteristics are coming to light. Synechococcus 7002 flourishes under intense light, tripling in size to accommodate a rapid expansion of the cellular machinery it uses to build proteins. Most cyanobacteria slow their growth in these conditions and redirect resources to repair damaged cells. But this blue-green algae does chemistry on the fly and grows more rapidly. This is why it is attractive to researchers who want to create better, less expensive biofuels and sustainable bioproducts. Read more at http://goo.gl/wzQVzF.
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Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)'s profile photoAugust Pamplona's profile photo
3 comments
 
Thank you very much!
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Panayiotis Stavrou

Popular Science  - 
 
Do you have an arm or leg missing but still feel that it's still there, sometimes with intense pain too? There's some good news!!! There's an experiment to fix the illusory perception!!..... How science finds the answers without the need of a god and superstition. :)
[4:30] V.S. Ramachandran explains what causes amputees to have sensations in their phantom limbs, the parts of the brain called mirror neurons. As we use the tools of science to explore the nature of humanity, we are learning more and more about how our brains function and what motivates our behavior, built-in biases and blind spots. These fresh insights are interesting scientifically, but they also evoke significant questions about our lived exp...
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Ivana Jo

Popular Science  - 
 
Get tested. Demand treatment.
 
Today is World Hepatitis Day!
Know #hepatitis: What is hepatitis? Are you at risk?
Act now: Get tested. Demand treatment.

#health #WorldHepatitisDay #liver
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