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Jonah Miller
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​​​Physical  - 
 
Climate science is reliable. Here's why.

If we can't predict the weather next month how can we predict climate change?

As this post describes, the answer is hidden in chaos theory.

The science is definitive. Global average temperatures are getting warmer and this is caused by human activity.

EDIT: there are some great comments by a real life climate scientist on the original post. So check that out.
 
If we can't predict the weather never month how can we predict climate change?

The answer is hidden in chaos theory.

This is a common misconception about how climate models work and this post is inspired by a question in the +Science on Google+​ community.

The climate is a so-called "chaotic system." See:
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaos_theory

One simple example of a chaotic system is the Lorentz attractor:
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lorenz_system

In a chaotic system, the behaviour of the system at any given time is very hard to understand. This is why we can't predict the weather very well.

But look at the movie of the Lorentz attractor below. Notice anything?

The particle moves all over the place. The motion is very hard to predict. But it's usual or average position is predictable! The particle is usually along those curves!

This is typical of chaotic systems and the climate is the same way. We can't predict the weather next week. But we can predict the general behavior of the average weather over many years. And this is why you should trust predictions about climate change. See:
http://climatechangeconnection.org/science/how-can-we-predict-climate/
http://www.skepticalscience.com/weather-forecasts-vs-climate-models-predictions.htm
http://www.climatecentral.org/library/faqs/if_we_cant_predict_weather_two_weeks_ahead_how_can_we_predict_climate
http://science.howstuffworks.com/nature/climate-weather/atmospheric/scientists-predict-weather.htm
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Elizabeth bailey's profile photoincredible Minecraft's profile photo
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+Elizabeth bailey OK plan b is setting RAD rotation and ocilation detecters up ovulate (orbit) earth
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It's crap, and that is what fills the GULF between it and actual reality.
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Orion McCarthy

Popular Science  - 
 
This is why research on marine plastics so important!!!
Is it possible to clean up the enormous oceanic garbage patches? Or does solving plastic pollution rely on prioritizing types of trash and specific regions of the ocean for a targeted campaign?
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sylvain pointier's profile photoDavid Belohrad's profile photo
3 comments
 
.... and as usual, smokers are winners. I never understood why are smokers so thoughtless. That's not only throwing garbage everywhere, but as well e.g. smoking in the entrances of the buildings so if non-smokers have to enter, they have to browse through the smoke.
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Natarajan Physicist

Popular Science  - 
 
After nearly four years on the Red Planet, the Curiosity rover has received an upgrade from NASA allowing it to use its ChemCam laser without human intervention
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Melinda Green's profile photoTyler Baxter's profile photo
3 comments
 
+William Kennison Joking?
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Fabiana Bueno

Popular Science  - 
 
From the article- Combining archaeology, archaeobotany, genetics and computational genomics in an interdisciplinary study has produced novel insights into the origins of our crop plants. "This is just the beginning of a new and exciting line of research," predicts Verena Schuenemann, from Tuebingen University, the second lead author of the study. "DNA-analysis of archaeological remains of prehistoric plants will provide us with novel insights into the origin, domestication and spread of crop plants."
 
The 6,000-year-old seeds - the oldest plant genome to be reconstructed to date
Most examination of archaeobotanical findings has been limited to the comparison of ancient and present-day specimens based on their morphology. Up to now, only prehistoric corn has been genetically reconstructed. In this research, the team succeeded in sequencing the complete genome of the 6,000-year-old barley grains. The results are now published in the online version of the journal Nature Genetics.
read the article here:
http://www.biologynews.net/archives/2016/07/18/genome_of_6000yearold_barley_grains_sequenced_for_first_time.html
right_photograph_during_excavation_exhibiting_excellent_dry_preservation_of_plant_remains left_a_wellpreserved_desiccated_barley_grain_found_at_yoram_cave_an_international_team_of_researchers_has_succeeded_for_the_first_time_in_sequencing_th
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Kifayat Afridi

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Helen Bamford's profile photoXavi Marti's profile photo
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The first scenes were catching but the last ones turned out to be scary!
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DOE Joint Genome Institute

Conferences/Job Ads/Communities  - 
 
Plan ahead: register now for the DOE JGI September 25-30, 2016 Microbial Genomics & Metagenomics Workshop. Our goal is to provide you with training in microbial genomic and metagenomic analysis and demonstrate how the DOE JGI's cutting-edge science and technology can enhance your research. Cost is $425 for the five-day course.
Details at http://mgm.jgi.doe.gov/

#genomics   #metagenomics   #training   #bigdata   #science   #technology   #education   #microbes  
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malgos's profile photo
malgos
 
ok

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Arran Frood

Popular Science  - 
 
Did you know that honeyguide birds can signal to people, who respond with a specific call to the birds that they will follow? They cooperate to find bees' nests, which the people use for honey and the bird eats the comb. An astonishing rare interaction with wild animals.

Check out this new 'research diary' video from UK bioscience funders BBSRC, about the research, undertaken by Dr Claire Spottiswoode of the University of Cambridge and published in Science.

Science story:
http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2016/07/unusual-bird-human-partnership-runs-even-deeper-scientists-thought

Link to the study:
http://science.sciencemag.org/content/353/6297/387
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Alex Nelson's profile photoWilliham Totland's profile photo
3 comments
 
+Alex Nelson Or when you compare it to domesticated animals. 
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Akshit Shetty

Popular Science  - 
 
Scientist have levitated a frog with magnets ! HOw? Lets find out..
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8tnbsHTMgxM
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J.r Sidoti's profile photo
2 comments
 
Using own free energy...?
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Paul Engle

Popular Science  - 
 
Biringuccio warned not to give glass too much love; like life, it is ephemeral http://www.conciatore.org/2016/07/an-art-of-fire.html

Vannoccio Biringuccio as depicted in the Specola Museum in Florence. Photo by I, Sailko 2009.Courtesy of Wikimedia common. #histSTM #glass
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Lou Flores

Popular Science  - 
 
Klaatu verata nictu:
Recently I listened to a panel of Canadian governmental advisors and pundits discuss the future of the Middle East and the wave of terror that has hit across the globe. One of the comments dealt with a new film called “Eye in the Sky” where drones were used to destroy a terrorist household. These pundits commented that human controlled drones are about to become obsolete, as advances in autonomous weapon systems come online. The issues brought forth outline how artificial intelligence poses hard choices dealing with civilians and human rights. In effect, we are endowing a machine the positions of judge, jury and executioner given the specific parameters of a possible situation. The major questions at the dawn of even more sophisticated pathways of warfare become highly problematic:
1/ Should a machine be given decisions over human life and death;
2/ Can such machines function “ethically;”
3/ Can machines follows the accords of international human rights law;
4/ Can such weapon systems tell the difference between civilian and terrorists;
5/ Can such devices judge the proportionality of attack;
6/ Who is left to be accountable?
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Sami Mattila's profile photoyash panchal's profile photo
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answer to question is NO.

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About this community

Science on Google+ is a community moderated by scientists, for all people interested in science, both professionals and the general public. The primary goal of this community is to bring real scientists to the public, for science outreach. A secondary and long-term goal is to create an environment that fosters interdisciplinary collaborations; thus, enabling and promoting cloud collaboration between scientists. See Guidelines and Rules section for additional details.
 
U.S Army Testing Genetically Engineered Spider Silk for Armor

Spider silk is considered one of nature’s toughest substances, comparable in strength to the Kevlar plastic present in bulletproof vests but is way more flexible. Kraig Biocraft Laboratories, a firm from Ann Arbor, Michigan, genetically altered silkworms to manufacture a fiber that is just like pure spider silk. Last week, the firm announced a U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) contract to test this genetically engineered silk, which they are calling Dragon Silk™ for potential use in body armor.

There is a reason that silk from worms is affordable but you possibly can’t purchase dresses made out of spider silk: spiders are cannibalistic and territorial, which makes farming them for material manufacturing ridiculously exorbitant.

Enter the wonderful new marvel that’s called genetic engineering. In 2000, researchers first isolated and sequenced the key proteins that create spider silk (ampullate spidroin-1, spidroin-2, and so on.) That allowed scientists to reproduce spider silk proteins in E coli bacteria, yeast and other substances in somewhat the same method as pharmaceutical firms produce proteins for medicine. However, these techniques didn’t yield spider silk in large enough quantities.

The technology behind Dragon Silk relies in part on the work of Donald L. Jarvis, Malcolm J. Fraser, and their colleagues. As they describe in this research paper, they introduced particular pieces of spider DNA into silkworm eggs, creating a completely new kind of silkworm that can spin spider silk. This enabled them to get the silk in larger quantities.

https://gadgtecs.com/2016/07/19/u-s-military-testing-genetically-engineered-spider-silk-for-armor/
Spider silk is considered one of nature’s toughest substances, comparable in strength to Kevlar present in bulletproof vests but it is way more flexible.
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Haseeb Anjum's profile photoPhil Kallahar's profile photo
2 comments
 
Friendly neighborhood U.S military 
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Astro Camp

Popular Science  - 
 
"During the 16-day NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) 21 expedition beginning July 21, an international crew will explore tools and techniques being tested for future space exploration by living in simulated spacecraft conditions and conducting simulated spacewalks outside of their undersea habitat, Aquarius.

Inside Aquarius, the international crew will conduct a variety of research and operations studies, such as testing a mini DNA sequencer that NASA astronaut Kate Rubins also will be testing aboard the International Space Station, and a telemedicine device that will be used for future space applications. During their simulated spacewalks, the crew will collect samples for marine biology and geology studies, test software for managing operations, and participate in a coral restoration project. Throughout many of these tasks, the mission will also test communications delays similar to those that would be encountered on a mission to Mars."
 
Why go deep under the sea to train astronauts to go into deep space? Find out about our NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) 16-day mission: http://go.nasa.gov/2ag0D5C
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Divyajyoti Sahoo

Popular Science  - 
 
 
PHENOMENON - PHOTON entanglement , an OVERALL SYSTEM !
Experiment with naked Eye ? ;) 
Predictions from quantum physics have been confirmed by countless experiments, but no one has yet detected the quantum physical effect of entanglement directly with the naked eye. This should now be possible thanks to an experiment proposed by a team around a theoretical physicist at the University of Basel. The experiment might pave the way for new applications in quantum physics.
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Nisha Solanki's profile photoJ.r Sidoti's profile photo
2 comments
 
IM READY !
 ·  Translate
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Robin Kirkpatrick

Popular Science  - 
 
If you want to ensure you have truly organic,GMO free food here is an option...
A partnership with Microsoft, the Living Produce Aisle, and a licensing arrangement for world sales has helped Urban Cultivator find its way into more homes and restaurants
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Dc Emechete's profile photoJohnathan Gross's profile photo
2 comments
 
"Why are we shipping food all around the world, food that’s losing nutritional value by the hour, and wasting fuel to do that, when we can grow micro greens anywhere pretty easily?"
Because you cannot feed someone off just microgreens. This can't provide the full daily caloric requirements a person needs. 
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BBSRC

Popular Science  - 
 
Did you know that birds and people can collaborate and cooperate with each other to find food?

They cooperate to find bees' nests, which the people use for honey and the bird eats the wax comb. An astonishing rare interaction between humans and wild animals.

The research was co-funded by BBSRC and led by Dr Claire Spottiswoode from the University of Cambridge, who shot this fascinating 'research diary' footage from the Niassa National Reserve in Mozambique.

Find out more in the University of Cambridge press release:
https://www.cam.ac.uk/research/news/how-humans-and-wild-birds-collaborate-to-get-precious-resources-of-honey-and-wax

Link to the paper 'Reciprocal signaling in honeyguide-human mutualism':
http://science.sciencemag.org/content/353/6297/387


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AstroCamp

Popular Science  - 
 
#TBT Five years ago today, the 135th and final space shuttle mission returned to Earth. This NASA image captures Atlantis, with STS-135 crew on board, landing at Kennedy Space Center.
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no, five years is youtubeuse note is five years
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Neuroscience News

Popular Science  - 
 
Watching the Brain do Math

Brain activity patterns reveal distinct stages of thinking that can be used to improve how students learn mathematical concepts.

The research is in Psychological Science. (full access paywall)
Summary: According to a new study, brain activity patters show different stages of cognition which can be used to improve how students learn math.Source: Carnegie Mellon University.Brain acti
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Fabiana Bueno

Popular Science  - 
 
From the article: The study also demonstrates what should be a common goal for medical devices—knowing the molecular mechanism by which they treat disease, says Tracey. By knowing how VNS improves rheumatoid arthritis symptoms, he says, “we know enough about the target and the pathway that we should be able to keep moving forward fast.”
 
#Bioelectronic #Medicine #NEWS Written By Megan Scudellari:
By selectively stimulating nerve fibers running from the brain to the spleen with electricity, researchers have successfully treated a small group of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Importantly, the team showed the exact mechanism by which the procedure works: Vagus nerve stimulation activates immune system cells to inhibit the production of key inflammatory proteins, called cytokines, implicated in the disease. 
read more:
http://spectrum.ieee.org/the-human-os/biomedical/devices/hacking-the-nervous-system-to-treat-arthritis
Stimulating the vagus nerve with a bioelectric device suppresses inflammation to treat rheumatoid arthritis
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Vishal Gangani's profile photo
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Nice one
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Sometimes the biggest surprises come in the smallest packages. PNNL scientists contributed to a recent Nature Microbiology letter on novel metabolic strategies in the ocean bacterium Pelagibacterales (SAR11). To their surprise, scientists discovered that the bacterium’s metabolic circuits stay activated all the time as a “survival mechanism.” Read more at http://goo.gl/qkKPHG.
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Maria Prihtamala Omega's profile photoSneha Sharma's profile photo
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nice info

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