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+Frank Elliott provides excellent resources to learn more about the Chauvet-Pont d’Arc, an ancient cave site with art dating back over 36,000 years. New technologies are enhancing social science discoveries about the cultural and ecological significance of the site.
"Anthropologists and paleoarchaeologists will be studying this for a very long time." #SoG+CuratorsChoice
Smithsonian Magazine featured the discovery of the magnificent grotto of paleolithic art in Chauvet Caves in its April 2015 issue. There's  a full… - Frank Elliott - Google+
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The roof of the cave looks as though one time it was moving!!
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Nbvbh
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Jacob Pourat

Science News (Pop Sci)  - 
 
Viral mimicry technique that allows your immune system to see cancer cells and destroy them
Researchers targeting colorectal cancer stem cells - the root cause of disease, resistance to treatment and relapse - have discovered a mechanism to mimic a virus and potentially trigger an immune response to fight the cancer like an infection.
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He he! He is cute! That smile!
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John Measey

Science News (Pop Sci)  - 
 
Why do some frogs eat other frogs?

https://peerj.com/articles/1204/ 

Normally, frogs eat small invertebrate that easily fit into their mouths, but countless studies of stomach contents have shown that they sometimes eat eggs, tadpoles and even adults of other frogs. What are the conditions under which frogs eat frogs? 

This was the starting place for a study led by Centre for Invasion Biology (CIB) researchers John Measey, Giovanni Vimercati, André de Villiers, Mohlamatsane Mokhatla, Sarah Davies and Shelley Edwards. They reviewed 323 papers on frog diet, extracting variables that might help explain why frogs sometimes eat frogs. Over a fifth of these records reported predation on frogs (anurophagy), and there were some superfamilies that were particularly biased in this behaviour. The researchers found that large invasive frogs that live in forests with high anuran diversity are most likely to have a higher proportion of anurans in their diet.

“It is particularly interesting that we found invasiveness to be a significant determinant of anurophagy” said John Measey lead author and CIB Senior Researcher, “this will help managers who are often unaware of the effects of invasive frogs.”

Measey GJ, Vimercati G, de Villiers FA, Mokhatla MM, Davies SJ, Edwards S, Altwegg R.(2015) Frog eat frog: exploring variables influencing anurophagy. PeerJ 3:e1204https://dx.doi.org/10.7717/peerj.1204
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"What are the conditions under which frogs eat frogs?"
When they are hungry!
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Understanding Animal Research

Science News (Pop Sci)  - 
 
Zebrafish rebuild the skeleton of amputated fins
Fish, in contrast to humans, have the ability to fully regenerate amputated organs. If part of the zebrafish tail fin is injured, the lost tissue is replaced within 3 weeks, making it a favored animal model to study the cellular and molecular principles of organ regeneration. Researchers have now uncovered the mechanisms that allow bone-forming cells to regenerate a correctly shaped new fin skeleton. They hope that it can help in human organ regeneration.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/08/150824114601.htm
Photo: https://www.flickr.com/photos/8659392@N07/
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Griffith Sciences

​​​​​​​​​Earth  - 
 
Professor Jean-Marc Hero is a vertebrate ecologist with research expertise in conservation biology of amphibians, biodiversity assessment and monitoring, and conservation physiology. He is Deputy Director of Griffith University’s Environmental Futures Research Institute and leads a team focusing on causes of global amphibian declines (disease, habitat loss and pollution), amphibian adaptation and response to climate change, and sustainability indicators for terrestrial ecosystems. He is also an active member of the Australian Society of Herpetologists, and Secretary General for the World Congress of Herpetology.
Professor Jean-Marc Hero is a vertebrate ecologist with research expertise in conservation biology of amphibians, biodiversity assessment and monitoring, and conservation physiology. He is Deputy Director of Griffith University’s Environmental Futures Research Institute and leads ...
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I was told it was bees, but whatever. All life on our little earth is precious and should be respected.
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Ivan Raszl

Science News (Pop Sci)  - 
 
"In a suburban industrial park south of Los Angeles, researchers have taken a significant step toward mastering nuclear fusion—a process that could provide abundant, cheap, and clean energy. A privately funded company called Tri Alpha Energy has built a machine that forms a ball of superheated gas—at about 10 million degrees Celsius—and holds it steady for 5 milliseconds without decaying away. That may seem a mere blink of an eye, but it is far longer than other efforts with the technique and shows for the first time that it is possible to hold the gas in a steady state—the researchers stopped only when their machine ran out of juice."
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ElectricShip c'est " online ". Meri.
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Social Networking is allowing the world to become more and more global. Yet we can connect everyone in the world together in less than six steps, or four according to Neil deGrasse Tyson. 
Veritasium explains how we are all connected in less than six steps, or less thanks to networking.
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Debaleena Ghosh

Science News (Pop Sci)  - 
 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology is undoubtedly full of technology connoisseurs and it is obvious that we get to see some new innovations coming out of MIT every single day. The Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) had innovated a 3D Printer which has some additional cost effective and versatile qualities than a conventional one. 3D printing technology is an emerging technology which has multifarious applications in making 3D designs, mobile and laptop skins, miniature architectures, art, medicine and so on.
 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology is undoubtedly full of technology connoisseurs and it is obvious that we get to see some new innovations coming out of MIT every single day. The Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) had innovated a 3D Printer which has some additional cost effective and versatile qualities than a conventional one. 3D printing technology is an emerging technology which has multifarious applications in making 3D designs, mobile and laptop skins, miniature architectures, art, medicine and so on.
Massachusetts Institute of Technology is undoubtedly full of technology connoisseurs and it is obvious that we get to see some new innovations coming out of MIT
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Good toys might be synthetic bodies, based on idealized carbon structure, or something else altogether. The reality of interpersonal interactions is becoming far more commonly known, if not more accepted....the future is interesting, still not complete continuity of process... 
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About this community

Science on Google+ is a community moderated by scientists, for all people interested in science, both professionals and the general public. The primary goal of this community is to bring real scientists to the public, for science outreach. A secondary and long-term goal is to create an environment that fosters interdisciplinary collaborations; thus, enabling and promoting cloud collaboration between scientists. See Guidelines and Rules section for additional details.

Kenny Chaffin

Science News (Pop Sci)  - 
 
"As astronomical techniques become more advanced, a team of astrophysicists think they will be able to not only detect the signatures of alien life in exoplanetary atmospheres, but also track its relentless spread throughout the galaxy.

The research, headed by Henry Lin of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA), assumes that this feat may be possible in a generation or so and that the hypothesis of panspermia may act as the delivery system for alien biology to hop from one star system to another...."

http://news.discovery.com/space/alien-life-exoplanets/could-alien-life-spread-like-a-virus-to-the-stars-150827.htm
As astronomical techniques become more advanced, a team of astrophysicists think they will be able to not only detect the signatures of alien life in exoplanetary atmospheres, but also track its relentless spread throughout the galaxy.
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This discussion is not really helpful. It avoids the question how the aliens have been evolved. For sure it is possible aliens have spread live but we can hardly end at this point and what we see here on earth it is not very probable the life here was "injected". 
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When thinking of marine predators, snails aren’t usually the first animals that come to mind. The Kellet’s whelk is a type of carnivorous sea snail that lives in the sandy bottoms and kelp forests of the California coast, and inside its beautiful spiral shell lie a host of finely-tuned predatory tools and instincts. Learn all about them here.

http://cimioutdoored.org/kellets-whelk/
#whelk   #snail #mollusc
The Kellet’s whelk is a type of carnivorous sea snail that lives in the sandy bottoms and kelp forests of the California coast. Learn all about them here!
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Bottom line: According to research published in the August 21, 2015 edition of Science, extreme human predatory behavior is responsible for widespread wildlife extinctions, shrinking fish sizes and disruptions to global food chains." +EarthSky 

"
Our efficient killing technologies have given rise to the human super predator. Our impacts are as extreme as our behavior, says study.
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Esben Østergaard

Science News (Pop Sci)  - 
 
#Robotics is becoming a widespread field of #science with a lot of potential for new technologies and business models. That being said, #children should be able to get a glimpse of what kind of work and activities are connected with it as soon as possible. +The Guardian adopted this idea and collected a lot of useful ideas for primary and secondary #school teachers on how to teach their pupils about #robots. I would certainly like to see those suggestions realized.
Design a mechanical arm, explore robots in space and debate whether machines can be creative. Here’s how to give your robotics lessons the kick of life
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Understanding Animal Research

Science News (Pop Sci)  - 
 
Newts can help Osteoarthritis patients
Researchers have adapted the astonishing capacity of animals such as newts to regenerate lost tissues and organs caused when they have a limb severed to develop an effective stem cell treatment for osteoarthritis. There is currently no treatment to prevent the progression of osteoarthritis, and people with severe disease often need total joint replacement surgery. The scientists have developed a technique inspired from the tissue regeneration of newts to rejuvenate cells from older people with osteoarthritis to repair worn or damaged cartilage thus reducing pain.

http://www.alnmag.com/news/2015/08/how-newts-can-help-osteoarthritis-patients
Photo: https://www.flickr.com/photos/jurvetson/
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AWESOME!!!!
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Further evidence of Social Leaning in Crows

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/08/150826113817.htm#
Among our greatest achievements as humans, some might say, is our cumulative technological culture -- the tool-using acumen that is passed from one generation to the next. As the implements we use on a daily basis are modified and refined over time, they seem to evolve right along with us.
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+Mehrdad Razi
یا جده سادات!
 ·  Translate
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NOVA produced a great documentary detailing the science behind vaccination and why it is important. Also discussed were numerous misconceptions & controversies that steer people away from getting vaccinated, and how we should correct them. It's worth a free hour.
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Phone Trips (Mark Bernay)'s profile photoIan Martin's profile photoRoy Weischadle's profile photoRob Carver's profile photo
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+Sergio Barajas I think vacinations are  a good thing, but you would have the government mandate them?  And what happens to a parent that chooses not to?  Jail?
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Bruce Elliott

Science News (Pop Sci)  - 
 
Here's a nice simplified description of what quantum fields are. Like any simple description of a complex set of ideas, it sweeps an awful lot under the rug. I don't think it goes too far with the simple analogies, though, as so many simple explanations do.

http://www.ribbonfarm.com/2015/08/20/qft/
First of all, don’t panic. I’m going to try in this post to introduce you to quantum field theory, which is probably the deepest and most intimidating set of ideas in graduate-level theoretical phy...
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Now I can't wait for QE2.
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HEXAPOLIS

Science News (Pop Sci)  - 
 
Scientists, at New Mexico-based Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), have developed the technology that could potentially turn any window into a power source. For the very first time, researchers have managed to build large-scale luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) that, unlike their predecessors, are colorless, non-toxic and incredibly efficient. A type of building-integrated photovoltaic material, the device uses colloidal quantum dots (basically, semiconductor nanocrystals) for the concentration and absorption of incident solar radiation.

source: http://www.lanl.gov/discover/news-release-archive/2015/August/08.24-capture-sunlight-with-window.php
Scientists have developed colorless and non-toxic luminescent solar concentrators that could turn any window into a power source.
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