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It's wabbit season... EGG season; wabbit season... EGG season; wabbit season... EGG season; wabbit season... EGG season

EGG SEASON ... AH-HA!

I did my first pork shoulder 16 hour low and slow. I am 100% sold on this! It was great!

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Brisket on at 8 am.
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This brisket went on at 8 am and off and foiled at 2 pm for a couple hours.
This morning's brisket at 6 hours. Wrapped with some butter and back on for a couple more hours.
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San Luis obisbo, CA
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First time using the Egg tonight, success!

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My son helping me with the BBQ.
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Memorial Day weekend in the States, and a kickoff to Egg season.

Prepped/cleaned the egg on Saturday, then today, did an asian marinade for a pork tenderloin, seared at 600, then inserted plate holder and cooked tenderloin at 350 for 90 minutes or so. Still juicy, marinade caramelized during the sear, very tasty.

(Asian Marinade was Kelly Senyei's recipe from the Just A Taste website: http://www.justataste.com/best-asian-flank-steak-marinade-recipe.)

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Smoked a prime brisket a few weekends ago using the Franklin method. This was ~8 lb taken from the point side of an ~18 lb cut.

1. Take it out of the fridge and dry really well, rub with a very small amount of good quality yellow mustard, then season well with salt and fresh ground pepper. Let it stand for 1 hour at room temp.

2. Load your Egg with coal and wood, and about half and half (I used pecan wood, Franklin recommends oak but I didn't have that). I try to get a layer of coal on the bottom of the grate, then a layer of wood, then the rest on top intermixed. Use the plate setter and load a pan of boiling water under the grill grate. Start up your Egg a half hour before you plan to put the brisket on to get the wood going, stabilize the temp at 275°F. You don't want white billowy thick smoke, but bluish wispy smoke.

3. Put the brisket on and watch the temp. Usually the stall will kick in somewhere between 155°F and 170°F, but this one stalled at 188°F (I was starting to get nervous waiting for it). Once it hits 175°F (or nearing the end of the stall if it stalls high like mine did), you can wrap in butcher paper to speed things along, or just leave it.

4. At 203°F internal temp, take it off and rest it for 30 to 45 minutes. Slice about the width of a pencil, across the grain, and enjoy.
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3/9/16
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