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Pat Ballew
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Today in History  - 
Every science that has thriven has thriven upon its own symbols: logic, the only science which is admitted to have made no improvements in century after century, is the only one which has grown no symbols. Augustus de Morgan ...
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Pat Ballew
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Today in History  - 
Map of 2012 Transit of Venus visibility *Eclipse Maps No mathematician can be a complete mathematician unless he is also something of a poet. ~Karl Weierstrass The 158th day of the year; 158 is the smallest numbe...
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Pat Ballew
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Today in History  - 
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Linh Thuy's profile photo
 
interesting
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Pat Ballew
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Today in History  - 
 
http://pballew.blogspot.com/2016/05/on-this-day-in-math-may-30.html  The best review of arithmetic consists in the study of algebra. ~Florian Cajori
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Pat Ballew
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Today in History  - 
Twice two makes four seems to me simply a piece of insolence. Twice two makes four is a pert coxcomb who stands with arms akimbo barring your path and spitting. I admit that twice two makes four is an excellent thing, b...
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About this community

This community is for anyone interested in the history of mathematics from ancient to modern times. Anybody interested in math history at *any* level is welcome. NOTE: While there are a lot of interesting math memes, jokes, etc. floating around the Internet, we limit our discussion to topics of historical interest. Other posts will be removed.

Adams Emily

Mathematicians  - 
 
Polynomial as we all knows that these are the part of the mathematics. The polynomial is a kind of expression which contains the variables and the coefficient, and this employs in the operations of…
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"Polynomial" means simply "many names."  The names refer to terms of a polynomial function in the general form ax^2 + bx+ c, which is put at zero in order to discriminate the variables from the coefficients in a polynomial equation.  The assertion begs the question (petitio principii) "What is a function, and how does it differ from an equation?"

Notice that the general formula analyzes "any" number or value (x) in terms of three constant numbers {a, b, c}.  Solutions will be limited to {0, 0} where BOTH the argument of the equation AND the value of the function are zero plotted on coordinate axes, so "polynomial" expressions are also limited to problems of quadrature, in two dimensions, and no more of the "many" terms indicated by the name will admit solutions to cubic or higher powers in both perpendicular and transverse axes (or for conic equation).  The area of a circle therefore does not admit the intersections of cones into conic sections or, by intension, the hyperbola limiting the {0,0} origins as they branch, unlike the asymptopes at infinity where they begin-- or the ellipse extending {ab} major and minor axes coefficiently on the real plane of numbers in any of the 4 = 2^2 quadrants of coordinate axes.

https://plus.google.com/108657187448883149300/posts/gNiVzN9Ahb6


A "polynomial calculator" is therefore absurd; there is nothing to calculate.  Instead, the equivalence 16 = 4^2 = 2^4 is supposed to allow any number, not "many" (in terms of "poly") to mean any "multiple" of some "measure" (See Augustus De Morgan's explanation of the Fifth Book of Euclid".  You get these strings contrived of all manner of exponential powers ("n", say, in number) for Academics who believe passionately that "Mathematics begins with Calculus."  And anybody who doesn't believe you must be stupid.

https://plus.google.com/108657187448883149300/posts/JrhC51o8mJr


Funny, how recently this graphic has been visible in this post.  I believe it is describing a tangent to a curve in order to claim a relation between the number of curves and the value of a given power.  Problem: it plots the function, which has no basis for the exponent of x^n which justify (n - 1 = m) terms.  Then you take the "rational" nature of the tangent as you ignore the difference between its perpendicular at the x-axis and the radius which assigns it scale of magnitude--so you can force students into believing this kind of nonsense about "terms" follows from an equally absurd interpretation of prime numbers and the ordinal and cardinal differences in serial or summation expressions that they either learned or prepared to learn in calculus.
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Pat Ballew
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Today in History  - 
A statistician is someone who is good with numbers but lacks the personality to be an accountant. ~unknown (my apologies to all the statisticians out there) The 167th day of the year; 167 is the only prime requiring exactl...
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Pat Ballew
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Today in History  - 
1908 article discussing the return of the comet in 1910Whenever two unknown magnitudes appear in a final equation, we have a locus, the extremity of one of the unknown magnitudesdescribing a straight line or a curve.~Fermat...
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Linh Thuy's profile photo
 
interesting
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Lee Rothstein

Mathematicians  - 
 
Biography of Paul Erdos Best, most entertaining book I have ever read! http://www.amazon.com/Man-Who-Loved-Only-Numbers/dp/0786884061  - Lee Rothstein - Google+
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Lee Rothstein's profile photoPat Ballew's profile photo
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This I keep, it is a brilliant book.
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Pat Ballew
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Today in History  - 
The mathematics are distinguished by a particular privilege, that is, in the course of ages, they may always advance and can never recede. ~Edward Gibbon, Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire The 148th day of the year; ...
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