A Community for Humanists or Humanistically inclined people who are interested in discussing how Humanist ethics can be applied to real life
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Akiko A.

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Evangelical Protestants and Mormons are concentrated in the South and the interior West.What does this mean for the presidential race?
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Akiko A.

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Found on ... everything interweb.
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Bill Hill's profile photoNathan Lunde-Berry's profile photoEmre Bastiyali's profile photoNathan Bonsal's profile photo
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+Wendy W No but one of them is da bomb. (Oh god, this could have two meanings)
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crocodylus73

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Alan Bell's profile photoJustin Curtright's profile photoKevin Phillips's profile photo
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no, Ezekiel 26:14 says "I will make you a bare rock, and you will become a place to spread fishnets. You will never be rebuilt, for I the Lord have spoken, declares the Sovereign Lord."
or something very similar in an assortment of translations
in fact, Douay Rheims has:
14 And I will make thee like a naked rock, thou shalt be a drying place for nets, neither shalt thou be built any more: for I have spoken it, saith. the Lord God.
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Does you lack of belief cause problems with your believing relatives?
(RNS) In yet another sign of polarized society, 49% would be unhappy with an unbeliever joining the family.
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mojorising0071950's profile photo
 
Without tolerance, this world will implode
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This an essay I wrote in response to someone complaining about one aspect of the American Humanist Association. I get so tired of the "you'll make Christians sad..." argument I hear from people insulated in their typical western liberal secular bubble.

"I read an essay last night from James Croft about his thoughts after attending the recent American Humanist Association (AHA) convention. Titled ‘Beyond Secularism’, Croft complains that the AHA focuses too much on secularism and not enough on the issues he feels are more important. While I agree that we should be addressing more than ‘just’ secularism. I disagree with Croft’s assessment of the problem – if there is one."
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Akiko A.

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hhl 482's profile photoRon Shtigliz's profile photo
hhl 482
 
I don't believe that the Chic-fila case is really equivalent to businesses refusing to serve certain classes of people. There has never been a requirement that individuals patronize particular businesses. Southern whites were told that they had to let black people eat at their lunch counters, not that they had to eat at black owned restaurants.
If the owner of Chic-fila is going to use the money you spend there on causes with which you disagree, than patronising their stores is contributing to those causes. What's wrong with not doing so, and making others aware of the situation?
That's no different than making a claim of equivalency between a) a store that won't serve black people, and b) refusing to patronize a store that supports the KKK.
Two different things, I think most would agree.
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In the wake of the recent shooting in Santa Barbara the "Real Men don't X" movement has come back. This is my attempt to not only rationalize it's abolition, but to promote a conversation on the topic of Masculine Identity.
I hear people throw around the term "Real Men" in an attempt to separate themselves or others from the "Bad Men". "Real Men don't rape", "Real Men don't support Patriarchy", "Real Men aren't Beta", "Real Men don't need others...
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Jennifer Hancock
moderator

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America needs Humanist Lawyers. If you are a lawyer and want to help - contact AHA legal director - legal director, David Niose, at dniose@americanhumanist.org.
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Jennifer Isaacs

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Everybody is a Genius...  
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Heather Wallace's profile photoTom Spinella's profile photo
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THE MONA LISA: FEMALE BODY IMAGE
#bodyimage   #modernism   #feminism   #arthistory  

 Many many years ago, I happened to be invited to the home of a huge cosmetic brand owner. We were sitting in his lovely dining room, and as a pleasant conversation flowed, he was asked what his fundamental marketing strategy was. It is very simple, he replied immediately without any hesitation, any product that we sell must convey the notion that the woman is not only purchasing a foundation, a lipstick, a mascara, but she is getting “a whole new you”. Sales would drop drastically, he explained, if women were interested only in the products themselves. They must be persuaded that the use of a new product will create a transformation; their older self, with all its flaws and blemishes, will be gone, and a new, better woman will emerge.
This observation, articulated in a dispassionate and impartial tone, reveals an unbelievably simple truth: women are motivated by a profound need to cease to be who they are and to become someone else. One could described, in terms of female body image, it as a seed of self-hatred; I tend to think of it as self-rejection, or self-negation. The striving to be another person is so powerful that it nourishes huge industries.
Of course, feminine embellishment in itself is not new. It is documented since the dawn of humanity, in all cultures, regardless of their time and place. But the modern age has altered its nature, as it has done with so many of our desires. The hunger to go beyond the limits, to reach a new pinnacle, has been the source not only of endless achievements, but also, unfortunately, of a deformed self-perception. If one is to constantly try and ameliorate oneself, then perhaps his or her self is faulty and poor. This is the psychological mechanism, not the rational analysis, and it is true for both character and appearance. And since women were traditionally more prone to invest in their exterior aspect, they were more affected by the constant drive to both find faults and correct them.
Think, for example, of the Mona Lisa, created in the beginning of the sixteenth century. Let us ignore the many theories of her enigmatic expression and smile, and look at her simply as a woman modeling for an artist. Facing Leonardo Da Vinci, her countenance doesn’t reveal self-criticism but rather self-acceptance; and though she is modeling, her body seems relaxed, at most she is sitting erect. One could hardly imagine her trying to be anyone but herself. Could we imagine a contemporary model sitting like that in front of a camera, self-absorbed, perhaps indifferent to how she would look in the picture? Nowadays models always pose, either in a subtle manner or vulgarly, without concealing the attempt to please the spectator.
The drive to look better, to fix flaws, to cover blemishes — with the profound dissatisfaction associated with it — is overpowering. Somehow, awareness of its destructive nature doesn’t abolish it. To escape it, people sometimes seek refuge in other cultures lacking this constant drive, which is both compelling and oppressive.
Last summer I traveled for the first time to India. I spent the first day in Mumbai, touring the city with a friend. The first hours were overwhelming; a crowd huddling in muddy alleys on its way to a temple, children and elderly exhibiting their deformities as though they were treasures, foulness which is a pillow to rest one’s head on and fall asleep, starved dogs, and high society people dining at the fancy Taj Mahal Hotel. But in spite of the exhausting attempt to absorb it all, I immediately observed how Indian women walk gracefully in their traditional cloths, soft, colorful fabrics wrapped around their torsos, following the contour of the female body without forcing it into rigid forms. Rich or poor, full-figured or thin, young or old, they seemed at peace with themselves, so utterly remote from the Western inclination to constantly compare oneself to others, to try to be “a whole new you”. When I was leaving the Taj Mahal Hotel an elderly woman holding a basket of flowers approached me, her entire body covered yet her round belly bare, and she asked me in a soft voice: “Madam want flower?”
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Nathan Bonsal's profile photoMark De Haan's profile photo
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Definitely agree on the marketing strategies being based on fear of ugliness, the concept of self as a horrific thing that needs to be hidden, tweezed, spackled, sanded, painted, crimped, curled, moisturized, laser-cauterized and then highlighted is pretty obvious in women's magazines from a male perspective, since the tone they use to advertise to us is so markedly different and more supportive.
Even products marketed to mothers are marketed with shame and fear of maternal inadequacy. Look, if anyone's going to be ashamed of their mothering, it's going to be something she said as a mother, not which brand of diaper or snack yogurt pack that she chose. It's going to be a much larger decision. Nobody ever went to psychotherapy because their mother chose Skippy instead of Jif, either.
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Akiko A.

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Thirteen years ago, Sarah Morehead was a practicing evangelical Southern Baptist, following in the footsteps of her family by attempting to meet the r...
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Akiko A.

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On Iraq's Western border, the masked jihadists of ISIS have been quite literally bulldozing the frontier of a new Islamic state, merging the Iraqi areas they now control with rebel areas in Syria.
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Hubub

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Join the hubub and share your thoughts on how to reduce homelessness. 
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So just how should non-theists treat theists? 
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mojorising0071950's profile photoCorey Lewis's profile photo
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Humans need to treat each other with dignity and respect, and allow people to believe what they believe, as long as their beliefs do not harm others. Why is it that so many humans feel the need to convert others to their way of thinking?
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Hey buddy, I'm from Indonesia..
I just go to Humanity, and i was to make a blog who this move to humanist..
Please visit my blog, and thank you so much..

http://indonesianhumanist.blogspot.com/
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Brad Miller

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"I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel." Maya Angelou
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Monica Madison's profile photo
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Atheist Census. Takes a few seconds, and some interesting results.
http://www.atheistcensus.com/
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Jennifer Hancock
moderator

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Quick reminder to everyone here - this group is for discussing humanism and how to improve society as Humanists. Off topics posts will be removed.
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Garrett Wolf's profile photoRichard C Brown's profile photoJennifer Hancock's profile photo
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Thankz!!
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