Stream

Join this community to post or comment

Francis Hayes

Discussion  - 
 
Do you think that Tau would be an important constant when it comes to replacing 2π?
202 votes  -  votes visible to Public
22%
78%
Yes, Tau is good
22%
No, Pi should stay
78%
7
1
K Lindberg's profile photoRamon Litonjua's profile photoif you know's profile photo
8 comments
 
S6 accelerator test

Add a comment...

Ciprian Begu

Discussion  - 
 
What do you think about this idea: "To make a machine that thinks, the machine must carry the conceptual hierarchy. It must now be able to detect which entity is more abstract, and which entity is an instance of that abstract idea."

http://www.ashishdalela.com/2016/05/01/how-meanings-change-the-use-of-logic/
1
Bruce Mincks's profile photoPaul Gowan's profile photo
3 comments
 
" Facts about concepts are asserted using certain CycL sentences."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CycL

Human-level concept learning through probabilistic program induction
http://science.sciencemag.org/content/350/6266/1332

"Milk production at a dairy farm was low, so the farmer wrote to the local university, asking for help from academia. A multidisciplinary team of professors was assembled, headed by a theoretical physicist, and two weeks of intensive on-site investigation took place. The scholars then returned to the university, notebooks crammed with data, where the task of writing the report was left to the team leader. Shortly thereafter the physicist returned to the farm, saying to the farmer, "I have the solution, but it only works in the case of spherical cows in a vacuum".
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spherical_cow

Is the following statement true?
"The problem in modern science is that it has begun from a fundamental presupposition, namely that all the world is uniform, and all objects are of the same type. " http://www.ashishdalela.com/2016/05/01/how-meanings-change-the-use-of-logic/
Add a comment...

K19

Discussion  - 
 
Sharing this interesting facts! ♥
 
Did you Know?

We need leap years because it takes Earth 365 days, 5 hours, 48 minutes and 45 seconds to orbit the Sun, causing the calendar year to become more and more out of sync with the solar year over time. Every year, the calendar falls about one-quarter of a day behind the solar year. Over time, Jan. 1 would come earlier in winter, then in the fall. After about 780 years, New Year’s Day would coincide with the summer solstice. If we didn’t have leap days, * February 2016 would actually be July 2017 and today would be Sept. 10, 2017.

* If you begin counting from the time Julius Caesar met Egyptian astronomers and created a new calendar.

Source: http://graphics.latimes.com/leap-year-2016
39
12
Aydin Akcasu's profile photoAnn A. Newcomb's profile photofabian camilo cubillos morales's profile photoSantanu Dhara's profile photo
5 comments
 
Thank you for the clarification, I've subtracted those 26 seconds.
Add a comment...

enlong chiou

Discussion  - 
 
Congruent number can get from R.O.S.E for Pn^2+Pm*n/Pn which each Pm correspond to a elliptic curve, and it's modular function which mean have infinity solutions with correspond P,Q on elliptic curve prove Pythagorean theorem over rational number imply elementary proof of Birch and Swinnerton-Dyer conjecture, let Pm in R.O.S.E as algebraic cycle with correspond elliptic curve as Hodge cycle as element go through plus, multiple get all of manifold can relate to Hodge conjecture.
2
Add a comment...

OM SATYA TRUTH

Discussion  - 
 
RAMANUJAN MATHEMATICS | STEPHEN WOLFRAM | 04.27.2016

|| TRUTH VERSUS NARRATIVE | EXCERPT ||

Ramanujan's way of working must have seemed quite alien . For Ramanujan was in some fundamental sense an Experimental Mathematician :

Going out into the Universe of Mathematical possibilities and doing calculations to find interesting and significant facts — and only then building theories based on them .

|| SEEING WHAT IS IMPORTANT | EXCERPT ||

Ramanujan was surely a great human calculator , and impressive at knowing whether a particular Mathematical fact or relation was actually true .

But Ramanujan's greatest skill was , I think , something in a sense more mysterious : an uncanny ability to tell what was significant , and what might be deduced from it .

CLICK PHOTO TO READ COMPREHENSIVE ARTICLE & ACCESS RESOURCES ➤➤

#mathematics #ramanujan #wolfram #srinivasaramanujan #stephenwolfram #mathematica #math #computation #computing #puremathematics #numbertheory #experimentation #discovery  
Ramanujan's way of working must have seemed quite alien . For Ramanujan was in some fundamental sense an Experimental Mathematician : going out into the Universe of Mathematical possibilities and doing calculations to find interesting and significant facts — and only then building theories based on them .
15
4
Karsten Uredat's profile photoSantanu Dhara's profile photo
Add a comment...

pett pette

Discussion  - 
 
This is the last poll. Please spare your time and vote. Thank you in advance
349 votes  -  votes visible to Public
46%
54%
ALGEBRA
46%
ANALYSIS
54%
15
pett pette's profile photoDarrick Allen's profile photo
15 comments
 
Algebra but last I checked, analysis = Algebra, Geometry,Statistics, Calculus, Statics, Physics and pretty much everything under the sun.  You need to know one or a few of them to do certain types of analysis. 
Add a comment...

enlong chiou

Discussion  - 
 
elliptic curve by R.O.S.E
 
R.O.S.E can transfer elliptic curve into vector, get direct answer, each prime correspond to a elliptic curve and composed, prime number are infinity can cover all of nature number(by induction) imply Fermat's last theorem by contradiction.
5
2
mahmut modanlı's profile photoPaul Gowan's profile photo
Add a comment...

JDS Purohit

Discussion  - 
 
Sharing a link that I had bookmarked long time ago. Cleaning up my bookmarks.


1
Add a comment...

pett pette

Discussion  - 
 
This is the 3rd of four(4) polls. Please spare some time to state your position. Thank you in advance!
313 votes  -  votes visible to Public
Integration
86%
Differentiation
8%
I am not sure...
6%
11
1
Илья Райко's profile photopett pette's profile photoCatoon Movies Desney's profile photo
20 comments
 
Thank you so much! Appreciated!!! Integration is the clear choice!!!
Add a comment...

Om Prakash

Discussion  - 
 
If I have 2 functions which generate random nos. Which of them will converge first?
1
Ray Woods's profile photoOm Prakash's profile photo
2 comments
 
Cool.. Thanks
Add a comment...

Fabiana Bueno

Discussion  - 
 
 
 A Ukrainian mathematician has solved the centuries-old sphere-packing problem in dimensions eight and 24.
Mathematicians have been studying sphere packings since at least 1611, when Johannes Kepler conjectured that the densest way to pack together equal-sized spheres in space is the familiar pyramidal piling of oranges seen in grocery stores. Despite the problem’s seeming simplicity, it was not settled until 1998, when Thomas Hales, now of the University of Pittsburgh, finally proved Kepler’s conjecture in 250 pages of mathematical arguments combined with mammoth computer calculations.
Higher-dimensional sphere packings are hard to visualize, but they are eminently practical objects: Dense sphere packings are intimately related to the error-correcting codes used by cell phones, space probes and the Internet to send signals through noisy channels. A high-dimensional sphere is easy to define — it’s simply the set of points in the high-dimensional space that are a fixed distance away from a given center point.
Finding the best packing of equal-sized spheres in a high-dimensional space should be even more complicated than the three-dimensional case Hales solved, since each added dimension means more possible packings to consider. Yet mathematicians have long known that two dimensions are special: In dimensions eight and 24, there exist dazzlingly symmetric sphere packings called E8 and the Leech lattice, respectively, that pack spheres better than the best candidates known to mathematicians in other dimensions.
read more:
https://www.quantamagazine.org/20160330-sphere-packing-solved-in-higher-dimensions/
19
5
Daniel Carvalho's profile photoCatoon Movies 2016's profile photoDisney Fairies Animation's profile photoJuro Kouril's profile photo
 
John Baez notes that the numbers 5, 8 and 24 are special in so many ways: http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/numbers/
Add a comment...

John Cook

Discussion  - 
 
There's a simple way to organize genealogies that has some nice mathematical properties.
There's a simple way to assign numbers to people in a family tree that's surprisingly useful.
10
3
Mike G's profile photoCatoon Movies 2016's profile photo
Add a comment...

enlong chiou

Discussion  - 
4
mary benford's profile photo
 
LIKE
Add a comment...

Bruce Mincks

Discussion  - 
 
Take a point P(x,y) where lambda is not (l~1).

More than one side(s) (2l) may join in an angle (alpha) which equals 2(r) = d, the number of dimensions at the point P(r, theta).  Then r^2 is equivalent with 4 = 2d , and

a     b     c    d

are 3(d) for {ad, ab, ac, bc}.

If {a, b, c, d} ||  {ad, ab, ac, bc},
then 3(d) consists in three perpendicular numbers ("sines") meeting alpha at V(x,y) from P , whether as the velocity of a vector, ab=C, or the vertex of {abc = D} in the Z = xy plane of 2(d) including P(q, r) at the index (i) of theta.

{a, b, c, d} are coefficient variables
in P (at ad = bc) or
as b^2 = ac exceeds (r = d/2)
where r^2 < r.  

Then ad/d = alpha & c = a/b,
but if d = 2(r) then (1/b = 1/c - 1/a)
means ad = bc || a/c = b/d
to/at (&)
a/d = b/c contacting the point R(p,q)
with the number r = PQ.  

Thus 4d = 3d + d, the difference between (a + d) - (b + c) in P which implies coefficient means (bc = cb & d = bc/a)
for the rate of scale for some process (ad > 2a)
which extends outside R = (p, q)
at the tangent C = (a, b)
where r = d/2.  

Five elements:

{1, 2, 3, 4, 5}

position four equal distances from the left side of 3(d)
(2a/a = 2b/c)
as sines acquire lengths in this distance.

If (r) also generates quadrants from equal sides (l), then parallel fields imply some join where any angle (theta) positions r = PQ across opposite sides into real planes.  

Whether equal units extend into a diameter (d = 2r) or the heights of any hemisphere (D = abc),
theta measures both sides of C(a, b)
as positions meaning C_a vary like the base of any hemisphere.

Radian measures begin where two diameters intersect (Z = (x, y)),
since we can imagine points in a circle (C = (a, b)) which separate the length outside some diameter from the number of possible perpendiculars (r = d/2 & C | Z = 2) which qualify as sines C_a | x at any given point on this surface.

Since sines are measured inside alternative circles, being parallel in order to extend, they stand apart from the greatest circle, the one which divides the sphere equally into hemispheres.

Order becomes significant there, in terms of right angles; in some exclusive sense, Z = (x,y) and D = (abc) intersect (3 x 2 = 6) x P fields in (3 + 2 = 5) directions from P = Z | D.  The vertices V either complete ad = bc in a whole circle (not a fractional part, unlike the ratio of the circle to the diameter) or correspond across quadrants to the same surface.

These points also project orbits for imaginary numbers at given distances from opposite sides of the required sphere.  Any arrangement {a, b, c, d} of these positions requires a different order of magnitude ("greatness") since d < 5 where  r = 1 but 5 = d
where d = 2r.  

Points R(p, q) correspond in numbers with separate means between
(b = ac) | (ad = bc)
in the direction of (d = a - c).

The points P(r, q) provide real origins for theta.
8
3
Bruce Mincks's profile photoSathish Kumar S's profile photoLuke Orshoy's profile photoKarsten Uredat's profile photo
2 comments
 
Any spelling-confusion between angle and angel is probably deliberate in English.  The quantity of space in any angle, this reasoning goes, depends on how it derives any quality of intelligence (x)  at the right one (1).

The types of triangle (equilateral, isoceles, scalene) are more fundamental for understanding numbers than the logic behind  (SAS, SSS, ASA)  proofs of their congrience, especially since proportional numbers must be based on similar triangles..

https://plus.google.com/108657187448883149300/posts/6rJY2DmozXB
Add a comment...

Alex Alaniz

Discussion  - 
 
Professor Frenkel: Why Shouldn't We Drop Algebra From Our Education System? 
The erotic video “Rites of Love and Math” caught my eye on a Colbert interview.
7
3
Alex Alaniz's profile photoPaul O'Malley's profile photoPaul Gowan's profile photoBeatrice Magalhães's profile photo
2 comments
 
+Paul O'Malley
Thank you!
Add a comment...
 
Often in undergraduate quantum mechanics, we are just given the momentum operator in the position basis and never delve into its form. I wanted to sit down and work out the underlying mathematics that allow for us to assume such an object. There are resources out there that have done this before, but it was mostly a personal challenge.

If you ever wondered how you could derive this operator, take a look and, as always, let me know if I've made an error!
Here is a cute trick to derive the momentum operator in quantum mechanics. Usually, we taken this for a given or a definition, however there are ways to prove the relationship. Here we explore the …
8
2
Aditya Dhumuntarao's profile photoPaul Gowan's profile photoAbak Hoben's profile photoAndrew Amgad's profile photo
3 comments
 
+Aditya Dhumuntarao I am nowhere near ASU. Apparently, neither is Dr. David Hestenes. I just consider that trick using Fourier transforms to be as dangerous as mixing the notation for vectors and matrices in the same equation in the development of Dirac's theory of the electron. It works, but the underlying reasons that it works are missed and left unexamined.  I don't know which of the writings of Dr. Hestenes or of the Physicists in Cambridge would make the point best, so I will just leave you with this quote and a small amount of link litter.

"A misplaced emphasis on operators in quantum mechanics has continued to cover-up the meaning of hermiticity and the relation of complex numbers to spin"

http://geocalc.clas.asu.edu/pdf/Observ-opers.pdf

http://geocalc.clas.asu.edu/
http://geometry.mrao.cam.ac.uk/

Geometric Calculus
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-JQxOYL3vhY   You can discover why Fourier Transforms work when you see the fundamental theorem of Geometric Calculus.
Add a comment...

Mithali Kannan

Discussion  - 
 
 
Some maths tricks by my math sir Shiva Sir plz watch, like n do subscribe....

N he is one of my fav. sir
😍😘😘😍😘
11
2
André Roelofs's profile photoRuslan Skira's profile photoHans-Christian Francke's profile photoSebastian Linn's profile photo
6 comments
 
With one it not works
Add a comment...

1001 Ebook

Discussion  - 
 
The main intention of this book is to describe and develop the conceptual, structural and abstract thinking of mathematics. Specific mathematical structures are used to illustrate the conceptual approach; providing a deeper insight into mutual relationships and abstract common features. These ideas are carefully motivated, explained and illustrated by examples so that many of the more technical proofs can be omitted.

Get Free Ebook on www.1001ebook.net
8
1
harshavardhan rajopadhye's profile photo1001 Ebook's profile photoCarlos Alberto Gutiérrez-Manuel's profile photo
10 comments
 
Please try download from dekstop.
email: www.1001ebook.net@gmail.com
Add a comment...