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Profit and Loss question - https://dhruvsir.wordpress.com
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pizam yoyi's profile photoJorge Barata's profile photo
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C
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Em Simony

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Math is beautiful
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Simina Stefania MARIS's profile photoKarthick Srivatsan's profile photo
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Find the next number of the series
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Cons Bulaquena's profile photo
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John Cook

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"A good stack of examples, as large as possible, is indispensable for a thorough understanding of any concept, and when I want to learn something new, I make it my first job to build one." -- Paul Halmos
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Mathematics is the language with which God wrote the universe. — Galileo
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Budsaraphorn L's profile photoDaniela Decembrino's profile photoyashwant panwar's profile photoMohammad Adel's profile photo
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chirs lim go home son of bitch .  your face is  looks like   owl .  at real you arenot human . you are an animal .
admit you are pwned you cannot handle the truth
your brain is cro magnon....  hey monkey  chris lim go  back to your cave  please 
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Math

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Linear transformations Matrices and matrix multiplication reveal their essential features when related to linear transformations, also known as linear maps. A real m-by-n matrix A gives rise to a...
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Albert the Great's profile photoNicholas Cantrell's profile photo
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Jim Slater

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Did we discover numbers, or did we invent them?

Some would argue that numbers are approximations of relationships, such as in quantum physics, where a subatomic particle can be in two places at the same time. Or when a wave behaves as a particle, switching from a probability to an "entity" when we try to measure its momentum or position.

What about, say, two apples? What happens when we cut one of the apples in half? We still have two apples, strictly speaking, but now we have three objects.

Some have even conjectured that the discovery of the Higgs Boson particle was a self-fulfilling prophecy based on calculations that predicted its existence, while others say that it is a confirmed feature of reality.

The Mandelbrot Set shows that there are properties of mathematical abstractions which have always existed, and when expressed by a relatively simple formula, exhibit patterns that have the same level of detail at all scales. But when we zoom into or out of a Mandelbrot Set, we are not seeing something that has any physical properties - just relationships between these abstractions. And yet we see these patterns everywhere in nature as fractals such as ferns, shorelines, mountain ranges, even galaxies.

So which is it - are numbers a fundamental property of reality, or are they a creation of the human mind?
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Christina Phillips's profile photoKaelyn Willingham's profile photoUnderguard Jaegeru's profile photoHilaal Alam's profile photo
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+Christina Phillips While I disagree with some of his stances on math, he does have a good channel.
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LThMathematics

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A little about Euler ^_^ Enjoy! 
This week we celebrated Euler's birthday on 15th and I thought I need to write something about him. In my (almost) 4 years of university I have heard his name a lot of time. And this is a thing esp...
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oliver marks

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I am looking for a way to join points together from two sets of parallel lines.

basically I am after the middle image the angle will vary so the below is an example.

my thinking is to work out the angle between the two lines and divide  by two to get the center i can then move along this line by half the distance between the parallel lines to get the new point location.

but i wonder is this a good approach ? it feels like there may be an easier way ?

any advice ?
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oliver marks's profile photoNick Clarke's profile photo
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Nice. Good work! 
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Please don't fail me! :P
 
Round 2!

Numbers and/or mathematical objects exhibit supernatural properties.
199 votes  -  votes visible to Public
Strongly Disagree
56%
Somewhat Disagree
8%
Neutral / Not Sure
12%
Somewhat Agree
11%
Strongly Agree
14%
15 comments on original post
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pizam yoyi's profile photoHarrison Totty's profile photo
7 comments
 
+pizam yoyi what does that have to do with my post?
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(Edited)
A (simple) definition:
Let f:A -> B be a function. Let a and b be distinct elements belonging to both the sets A and B such that at least one of them is non-zero.

We define f to be elastic iff there exists at least one pair of elements, a and b, such that f(a)=b and f(b)=a.

If such a function exists, what are its possible uses? Would it help in studying recurring patterns?

Another definition:
Consider a function f: A -> B. We define f to be cyclic iff the following statements hold true. 
1) For every element a(k) in the sequence of elements {a(i)}, f(a(k))=a(k+1) and f(a(k+1))=a(k), 
2) If the sequence is finite (ending with the element a(n)), f(a(1))=a(n) and f(a(n))=a(1). 
Note: Here, the sequence {a(i)} belongs to both the domain and the codomain, and, i={1,2,3.......} for an infinite sequence or i={1,2,3.....n}, for a finite sequence. Here, n is a positive natural number and k belongs to {1,2,3.....} (for an infinite sequence) or {1,2,3.....n} (for a finite sequence).

Can we find such a function which is both continuous and differentiable? 
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Paul Hartzer's profile photoVedanth Bhatnagar's profile photo
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+Paul Hartzer​ Sorry, edited the comment. The latter function is elastic.
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Infinity of different sizes

I was discussing with a friend if infinity can have different sizes? We couldn't agree so we decided to look it up and so we have come across something called cantor's diagonalization argument.

We followed it and we kind of a agree with it.

BUT..... why can't we use it for integers? Why can't we use it to prove integers are uncountable?

We tried to look it but got lost pretty quickly. Can someone please explain it in simple terms? 
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Michal Canecky's profile photoElhusain Elsharif's profile photo
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Okay I haven't studied this I just followed it on a video. But they didn't say we had to change the numbers to binary
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In recent years, at the interface of game theory, control theory and statistical mechanics, a new baby of applied mathematics was given birth. Now named mean-field game theory, this new model represents a new active field of research with a huge range of applications! This is mathematics in the making!
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Recent Articles. The Secretary/Toilet Problem and Online Optimization · Lê Nguyên Hoang The Secretary/Toilet Problem and Online Optimization By Lê Nguyên Hoang | Updated:2015-04 | Views: 856. A large chunk of applied mathematics has focused on optimizing something with respect to all relevant ...
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Chau Tu's profile photosathish kumar's profile photoWilliam Urrego's profile photoBarry Poston's profile photo
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Cool
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Can anyone suggest a website or an app that I can use to solve the travelling salesman problem?
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Rajatadri Venkatasubban's profile photo
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Thank you.
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Visit the post for more.
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Michael Mitchell's profile photoGiovanni Russo's profile photoyashwant panwar's profile photoMohammad Adel's profile photo
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May be Science :-)
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John Cook

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Leave factions unreduced and leave roots in a denominator if this makes it easier to follow what you're doing. And if order of operations is puzzling, stick in some parentheses. It's more important to communicate clearly than to follow pedantic conventions.
Clear communication is more important than following pedantic conventions.
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John Hunsberger's profile photoRafael Miranda-Esquivel's profile photoJuan Pablo Carbajal's profile photoMike Aben's profile photo
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Parenthetical disambiguation!!! Clear communication!!! Wow!  You are my hero!
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A few thoughts on the philosophical foundations of geometry:
All of geometry stems from the one basic constituent, that is, the notion of a point. Point has no measure, in measure theoretic and topological terms.
How is it so easy to grasp this notion? When I think deeply about this, I find the notion of a point to be the most incomprehensible, because, an immeasurable object can be measured, if it constitutes some geometrical object. Otherwise, it is immeasurable.
If a point is in fact immeasurable, from whence does the concept of a point being adjacent to another point arise?
These primitive notions are precisely those which make the formalism of mathematics impossible.
Let me know what you think in the comments section.
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shivam jhariya's profile photoVedanth Bhatnagar's profile photo
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+shivam jhariya Thank you for your enlightening response.
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Hello to all! A new lesson is here! This time we decided to put few things about Triangle inequalities - http://www.mathemania.com/triangle-inequalities.php. Hope that you'll like it. :) We wish you a great weekend.
The triangle inequality says that one side in a triangle must be lesser than the sum of other two.
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A question:
Consider an axiomatic system. In this system, we propose two statements, p and q, both of which we find to be true.
My question is, can there be two such statements p and q such that accepting either one implies the other to be a contradiction (to the other or to any one of the axioms of this system)?
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Vedanth Bhatnagar's profile photoIan Malloy's profile photo
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I could have phrased that better...

But no, not entirely unrelated as far as I recall, my work in formal logic was almost a decade ago!

+Vedanth Bhatnagar
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