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Kentu KemPtah

Meta Discussion  - 
 
How the same Exact Function can yield different Graphs
 
How the same Exact functions can yield different Graphs

The graph we are looking at is a Ascending Cubit Perpendicular Graph which is design to show different graphs of different Y and Y axis that have different base systems. It is design to show you plots and graphs of the same function but x and y values being of different base systems. The Cubit Graph does this by placing its units out according to place(space) value. Thus a single digit is a unit or basic length while numbers with 2 place values are double that of the unit. 3 place value numbers are triple that of the unit length.

Below

Are three graphs with the same function but the values of x and y varies and sometimes x and y can be the same base system. All three graphs is a plot of f(x) = 1+2. Big Smiles
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Kentu KemPtah's profile photo
 
It suppose to be f(x) = 1 + x instead of 1+ 2. My bad.
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Tyler Jackson's profile photoDarrick Allen's profile photo
2 comments
 
And if the small numerator and large denominator ever decide to switch places, it would not be proper.....
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Gokul Krishnan

Puzzles/Riddles  - 
 
Can you solve this??
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Rob Mellor's profile photoSnail Erato's profile photo
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Assuming that the probability to catch a fish in an interval dt is the same whenever the interval starts, I found the following formula giving the time t to catch a fich with probablity p:
t(p)=T*ln(1-p)/ln(1-P)
where P is the known probability to catch a fish in known time T.
For T=30 and P=0.95 that gives for t(0.5) the same as +Onise Sharia

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rare avis

Discussion  - 
 
 

The Code Within The Cancer: Can Math Lead Us To The Cure?


Disappointed with the slow pace of discovery and inclined to look for elegant, universal explanations for nature’s conundrums, many cancer researchers have increasingly been asking: Is there some sort of “Da Vinci Code” for cancer? And can we crack it using mathematics?

Quantitative modeling has been extremely successful in disciplines as diverse as astronomy, physics, economics and computer science. Can “cancer quants”—scientists applying quantitative analyses to the landscape of cancer biology—find the answers we seek? And, if so, what would the new paradigm look like?

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There is mounting evidence that virtual, computation-based methods are particularly effective in detecting aberrant proteins in this hidden layer of cancer control. In our own labs, we rely on computational methods to pinpoint the “dark” proteins that constitute the command center of the cancer cell. Abnormal activity in these “master regulators” can result in rapid tumor growth and devastating propagation of cancer cells.

Perhaps most important, these proteins form tightly-knit modules—or “tumor checkpoints”—that represent the ultimate on-off switches in the cancer cell’s engine room, providing a new class of targets for anticancer therapy. There is already compelling evidence, widely published in scientific journals, to support the existence of such universal on-off switches for cancer.

Indeed, the more we use quantitative models, the more we understand that cancer isn’t the result of a single gene going rogue—the premise of the mutation-based therapy approach. Rather, cancer develops when an entire gang of rogue proteins work in concert to thwart the defense mechanisms that cells use to keep cancer at bay.

This is no mere hypothesis. Clinical trials at Columbia, in patients with metastatic and drug-resistant breast cancer, have already started to evaluate how well novel, multi-drug regimens can target the aberrantly activated proteins in a tumor checkpoint.

And in “N of 1” studies, also at Columbia—that is, studies in which a single patient is the entire trial—tumor checkpoints are being used to select the best therapy for 260 patients across 14 different kinds of previously untreatable tumors.

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Like astronomers and physicists discovering “dark” planets indirectly, from deviations in the trajectory of the stars around which they gravitate, we are able to use VIPER to begin to decode the hidden “oncotecture” of cancer—that is, the universal regulatory architecture of cancer cells.

It might seem counterintuitive to employ a virtual world to decode something as real as cancer, but predictions made by these methods are already undergoing rigorous clinical evaluation. These studies are geared to finding the specific drugs and drug combinations that, by short-circuiting the regulatory logic of the cancer cell, can help turn these tumor switches to the off position—permanently.

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Cancer researchers are only now beginning to appreciate how much they can learn by applying these new tools to one of medicine’s most elusive challenges: disabling, reversing or subverting the aberrant regulatory programs that ignite perfectly normal cells and morph them into monsters that explode with destructive fury.

Over the centuries, and across countless areas of human need, we have seen the power of numbers to improve our lives. Increasingly, it looks as if this will hold for cancer, too. It may just be a matter of getting the math right.



text omitted


{There is an absolutely fascinating documentary, older, '6 degrees of separation', which touches on this subject: finding the code within cancer and using it to heal. I was genuinely stunned, and it was so beautiful, it brought me nearly to tears.}
New quantitative models focus on the hidden architecture of tumor cells
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enlong chiou

Discussion  - 
 
Admissible (0,m) for twin prime, (0,m,n) for weak goldbach, Zhang's 70000000 gap need 70000000*4/(2*5*4*2) = 3500000 tuple from quadratic equation, Chen's theorem proved weak goldbach's conjecture(0,m,n) at 2+1, after apply (0.n) proved (0.m) goldbach and twin prime conjecture at m=2 from quadratic equation which is answer for Polignac's conjecture and Maynard Tao theorem.
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George Mpantes

Select a category (spam trap)-->  - 
 
the Erlangen program of Felix Klein
https://www.academia.edu/28522848
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Gaurav Haldar (Mauna)

Math Questions  - 
 
Complex numbers :

z + z' = 0 if and only if ?
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Rohit Soni's profile photoDyna Desir's profile photo
5 comments
 
" z' " is opposed of z 
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Tim Brzezinski

Freq Posts/Tricks  - 
 
Points of Intersection of consecutive angle bisectors of a quadrilateral are concyclic! "Proof" without words: https://www.geogebra.org/m/prspvPVS
Interesting, yet not-often-seen property of quadrilaterals
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Rene Grothmann's profile photoTim Brzezinski's profile photo
2 comments
 
+Rene Grothmann: T/Y. You're absolutely correct. Proof is not difficult. The word "proof" is in quotation marks (" ") to imply that it does not constitute a formal proof. It's simply a dynamic illustration. (Analogously, not everybody who's a "friend" on Facebook is truly a friend.)

+Adrian Reef: This illustration was created to simply engage the participant to informally discover a relationship of which he/she was simply not aware beforehand. If I had known who first discovered this relationship, I'd gladly put his/her name in the title of the applet. 
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enlong chiou

Discussion  - 
 
sieve of Eratosthenes for quadratic equation, for a possible gap have solution at any n by Maynard-Tao theorem on admissible prime k tuples, can reduce to 1/20 time smaller by restriction of quadratic equation, for example, m=70000000, for admissible k-tuple have 3500000 member, have at least one solution for any n, minus m become another prime number for (0,m) tuple, when m=2 for proof of twin prime conjecture, m=2*s for proof of goldbach conjecture, also prove Polignac's conjecture for any positive even number, there have infinitely consecutive prime number with difference m=2*s.
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Chad Moore

Challenges  - 
 
What is the best number?

Provider your justification.

Kudos to those that know the reference.

Have a fun Friday.
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Tyler Jackson's profile photoChad Moore's profile photo
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+Tyler Jackson the answer is in the comment before you....

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Syed Shakaib Ali

Videos/Pictures  - 
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Chirs Lim's profile photo
 
delet this
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Jean DAVID

Challenges  - 
 
Multiple reflections with backwards route - Solution
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Aydin Akcasu's profile photofizixx's profile photo
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fizixx
 
THANK YOU JEAN
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Gokul Krishnan

Freq Posts/Tricks  - 
 
Happy Perfect Square day....
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zachary vogel's profile photoMark Cooper's profile photo
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Game theory and the Presidential debates, deriving optimal strategies: https://relativitydigest.com/2016/09/25/optimal-strategies-for-the-clintontrump-debate/
Consider modelling the Clinton/Trump debate via a static game in which each candidate can choose between two strategies: $latex \{A,P\}$, where $latex A$ denotes predominantly “attacking̶…
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Radek Pieniazek's profile photo
 
The results are quite obvious, while assuming the same conditions at start. However, I believe Trump is at an advantage from a sociological stand point. The bar is set low for him, and he said outrageous things in the past and he got away with it. Something unlikely for other candidates in the history of US presidential elections.
In the equation language, the payoff from Trump attacking Clinton > payoff from Clinton attacking Trump
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Bec Sanderson

Discussion  - 
 
IQ improvement through laughter!
[The meeting place for intelligent people age 9 to 99+] Founded on the first of July, 2016 by Gazmend Ceno
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Philosophy and Science's profile photoPaul O'Malley's profile photo
4 comments
 
A very eloquently put question. Not one jot, an iota has more value.

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Jean DAVID

Challenges  - 
 
 
Backwards light ray
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fizixx's profile photoIlan Amity's profile photo
5 comments
 
+fizixx​ For the light ray to go back, it has to be perpendicular to one of the mirrors (after several finite bouncing). So you get a right triangle with an angle alpha. From there you go backward and find the requested relation. Try with one or two bounces.
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We see them all the times, some companies are still using them to hire people - a bad idea in my opinion. Anyway I've found this one posted on Facebook by one of my friends, and supposedly it went viral and was seen more than a million times. I've solved it in 10 seconds. 
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bijaybhaskar singh's profile photoHendrik Boom's profile photo
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I solved it while reading the first equation, confirmed it on the second, and wasted time checking all the others.
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Matt McIrvin's profile photonytom4info's profile photo
3 comments
 
Mathematics is a tool like a hammer or a saw ... don't complicate it...
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Kevin Clift

Discussion  - 
 
 
Zeno's Paradoxes

Melvyn Bragg, Mathematician +Marcus du Sautoy, and Philosophers Barbara Sattler and James Warren, explore Zeno's Paradoxes and how they may still inform and interact with the modern world, including Quantum Physics.  These discussions reveal interesting differences between the Mathematical and Philosophical understanding of the limits of certain infinite series and infinity itself.

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss Zeno of Elea, a pre-Socratic philosopher from c490-430 BC whose paradoxes were described by Bertrand Russell as "immeasurably subtle and profound." The best known argue against motion, such as that of an arrow in flight which is at a series of different points but moving at none of them, or that of Achilles who, despite being the faster runner, will never catch up with a tortoise with a head start. Aristotle and Aquinas engaged with these, as did Russell, yet it is still debatable whether Zeno's Paradoxes have been resolved.

Listen, and more (links and further reading) here: https://goo.gl/B5fJSt
(Stream, podcast, download MP3)

A related series of five fifteen minutes episodes is being presented from a largely Philosophical perspective with, at least to me, a mildly annoying didactic style, by Adrian Moore of Oxford University.

Adrian Moore starts his journey through philosophical thought on infinity over the last two and a half thousand years. In the first episode, he finds out why the idea made the Greeks so uncomfortable and introduces us to some of the first great thinkers on infinity.

We meet Pythagoras and his followers who divided the world into two fundamental cosmic principles. On one side was everything they thought of as limited or finite, and therefore good, and on the other everything they considered unlimited or infinite, and therefore bad.

The Pythagoreans thought they could explain the world around them in terms of the numbers - 1, 2, 3, 4, etc. - which we use to count finite collections of things, and they were utterly dismayed when they discovered that not every calculation produced the neat answer they expected. According to legend, one of their number was shipwrecked at sea for revealing this discovery to their enemies!

And we meet Zeno of Elea who, after wrestling with the notion of infinity, came to the conclusion that movement itself was impossible.

Horror of the Infinite (episode 1): https://goo.gl/UQkQHj
(Stream, podcast, download MP3)

Use next/previous episode function to navigate.
A History of the Infinite: (episode guide may be muddled) https://goo.gl/fNMtIL

Image: Martin Grandjean https://goo.gl/cNRGN0
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