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Dyman review, Paralympic judo dream for young Blackburn fighter

A YOUNG judo fighter who dreams of competing in the Paralympics has been hailed an ‘inspiration’ by a leading blind charity.

Caitlin Leigh, who has glaucoma and is registered blind, competes against fully-sighted youngsters and recently scored her first victory.

The 10-year-old, of Leopold Way, Blackburn, took up the sport five years ago after struggling to take part in ball-based sports and her mum is delighted by the huge confidence boost it has given her.

Claire, 32, said: “In judo you are grabbing hold of people pretty much the whole time so it’s much better suited for her.

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Dyman review: Ex-judo star gets to grips with world of finance

Sean Oldfield is revolutionizing the mortgage industry with innovative equity loans company, Castle Trust.

Sean Oldfield is a glutton for punishment. In 2002, he gave up a lucrative career in banking to pursue a grueling judo career.

He travelled around Europe on his motorbike, training in different judo clubs, with the aim of competing in the 2004 Athens Olympics.

World Judo Day of Dyman Judo Club Association & Dyman Karate Associates International

Source: http://www.design21sdn.com/organizations/1268

October 28th is Jigoro Kano's Birthday

Preamble

Judo is a sport of tradition based on a moral code that is not just a concept. This moral code is even the spine of our activity. The notion of respect, which was the theme of the first edition of the World Judo Day, is perhaps the strongest one for any judoka. Without respect, nothing is possible! The peaceful confrontation that is judo cannot take place without mutual respect. One of the symbols and a perfect concrete application of that respect is the bow. It opens a judo session, it closes it and between the two, "mutual aid and prosperity" and the "optimal use of energy" become possible. And that's why we have chosen the bow as the logo of the World Judo Day.

Judo also helps to convey the values of the moral code outside the tatami and to implement them in everyday life.

The World Judo Day initiated by the International Judo Federation aims to promote the values of our sport as they have been designed from its inception. With this event, the IJF also wants to eventually come closer to the people who make judo alive on a daily basis in all the dojo around the world.
 
 
Objectives

To promote a global awareness on the values of judo and its education system to all judo clubs and all judoka, through the Member Federations and with the help of the modern communication tools (website of the IFJ, social networks...). This year's theme: "JUDO FOR ALL". Judo clubs will be asked to take action "in" and "outside" of their club.


Know more about our social media: http://dymanjudoclub.blogspot.com/

Know more about our social group: http://www.tabup.com/Dyman_Judo_Club/

Related Articles:
http://togetter.com/li/597707
http://new.pitchengine.com/pitches/3426ca08-b39c-4c7c-a212-7be96529791c

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Dyman Judo Club Association & Dyman Karate Associates International: How to Participate?

Source: http://imgfave.com/collection/289349/Dyman-Judo-Club-Association-Dyman-Karate-Associates-International
Feel Free and Communicate

The World Judo Day is a special day dedicated to Judo all over the world.  

Thus, if you represent a continental union, a federation, a club or if you are a coach, an educator or a judoka and a judo lover, if you are a judo fan or/and if somebody from your relatives practices judo, you can gather together and participate to the World Judo Day and emphasize the theme of this third edition: Perseverance.

We have chosen October 28th for many reasons, the main one being that it is the birthday of the founder of Judo: Jigoro Kano. Today, more than 20 million people practice judo around the world on a daily basis. The IJF counts 200 national federations and five continental Unions. There is not a single spot on earth where judo is not practiced. The IJF wanted to dedicate a day to our sport in order to promote our values and our spirit. Judo is more than a sport; it is an educational tool that can help people to live together and to respect one another. Our objective is the increase the number of judo players around the World. You are the actors and the makers of the objective!

Feel free, to organize an event related to the World Judo Day.
 
Communicate

The World Judo Day must help you to communicate, to share experiences, to attract to your federation, regional league or club, people who have no idea about judo. It must be a powerfull tool of communication towards the public, the local, regional and national authorities and the Media.
 

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Early life of the founder of Dyman Judo Club Association & Dyman Karate Associates International


The early history of judo is inseparable from its founder, Japanese polymath and educator Jigoro Kano (1860–1938), born Shinnosuke Kano Kano was born into a relatively affluent family. His father, Jirosaku, was the second son of the head priest of the Shinto Hiyoshi shrine in Shiga Prefecture. He married Sadako Kano, daughter of the owner of Kiku-Masamune sake brewing company and was adopted by the family, changing his name to Kano, and ultimately became an official in the Bakufu government.

Jigoro Kano had an academic upbringing and, from the age of seven, he studied English, Japanese calligraphy and the Four Confucian Texts under a number of tutors. When he was fourteen, Kano began boarding at an English-medium school, Ikuei-Gijuku in Shiba, Tokyo. The culture of bullying endemic at this school was the catalyst that caused Kano to seek out a Jujutsu dojo (training place) at which to train.

Early attempts to find a jujutsu teacher who was willing to take him on met with little success. With the fall of the Tokugawa shogunate in the Meiji Restoration of 1868, jujutsu had become unfashionable in an increasingly westernised Japan. Many of those who had once taught the art had been forced out of teaching or become so disillusioned with it that they had simply given up. Nakai Umenari, an acquaintance of Kanō's father and a former soldier, agreed to show him kata, but not to teach him. The caretaker of his father's second house, Katagiri Ryuji, also knew jujutsu, but would not teach it as he believed it was no longer of practical use. Another frequent visitor to Kanō's father's house, Imai Genshiro of Kyūshin-ryū school of jujutsu, also refused. Several years passed before he finally found a willing teacher.

In 1877, as a student at the Tokyo-Kaisei school (soon to become part of the newly founded Tokyo Imperial University), Kano learned that many jujutsu teachers had been forced to pursue alternative careers, frequently opening Seikotsu-in, traditional osteopathy practices). After inquiring at a number of these, Kano was referred to Fukuda Hachinosuke (c.1828–1880), a teacher of the Tenjin Shin'yō-ryū  of jujutsu, who had a small nine mat dojo where he taught five students. Fukuda is said to have emphasized technique over formal exercise, sowing the seeds of Kano's emphasis on randori (free practice) in judo.

On Fukuda's death in 1880, Kano, who had become his keenest and most able student in both randori and kata ( pre-arranged forms), was given the densho (scrolls) of the Fukuda dojo. Kano chose to continue his studies at another Tenjin Shin'yō-ryū school, that of Iso Masatomo (c.1820–1881). Iso placed more emphasis on the practice of kata, and entrustedrandori instruction to assistants, increasingly to Kano. Iso died in June 1881 and Kano went on to study at the dojo of Iikubo Tsunetoshi (1835–1889) of Kitō-ryū . Like Fukuda, Iikubo placed much emphasis on randori, with Kitō-ryū having a greater focus on nage-waza (throwing techniques). 


Related Sites:
http://www.dymanjudoclub.com/#!why/c1enr
http://www.dymanjudoclub.com/#!classes/cnnz
http://www.dymanjudoclub.com/#!instructors/c1yi7

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Dyman Judo Club Association & Dyman Karate Associates International: Class Schedule

Main Site: http://www.dymanjudoclub.com

Classes are held at:
75 1st Street Orangeville
(Downstairs next to Mac's Milk.
Watch for the Millenium Door)


Teenagers & adults:
Tuesday & Thursday – 8:00 – 9:30 pm

Kids 7 - 14:
Tuesday and Thursday 7:00 - 8:00 pm

Kids 4 - 6 years:
Tuesday 6:00 - 6:50 pm


Related Sites:
http://www.dymanjudoclub.com/#!why/c1enr
http://www.dymanjudoclub.com/#!instructors/c1yi7

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Fred Dyke of Dyman Judo Club Association & Dyman Karate Associates International


Fred Dyke - 5th Degree Blackbelt (Godan)

Fred began Judo in 1968 while attending university. While he had not excelled in any sport, judo became a major part of his life as he progressed through the various junior ranks until he achieved the coveted level of Black Belt in just two and half years.
 
While receiving instruction from top Canadian and Japanese instructors, he competed provincially and nationally for 15 years during which time he won over 40 titles including 10 provincial championships and 3 Eastern Canadian championships. He placed as high as second in National Competition.
 
He has been an instructor of judo for almost his entire judo career, helping other clubs and running his own club.
 
Fred’s judo success has been helpful in his successful business career. As a management consultant he helps companies and individuals by providing training in many areas of business across North America and other parts of the world.
 
He has entertained audiences of 1500 or more using his judo demonstrations to teach valuable life lessons to high school students and company employees.
 
Fred is a certified instructor and Fifth degree Black Belt (Go-dan) operating under Judo Ontario and Judo Canada.


Related Site: http://www.dymanjudoclub.com/#!why/c1enr
Main Site: http://www.dymanjudoclub.com

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Dyman Judo Club Association & Dyman Karate Associates International: What is Judo?

Main Site: http://www.dymanjudoclub.com/

What is Judo?
- A great opportunity to enjoy an activity that will improve all areas of your life.
- Produces strong work ethic and values in kids by teaching respect, self-discipline and cooperation while building confidence.
- A great family activity.
- It burns more calories than watching TV
- Teaches amazing skills and values


Which is better Judo, karate etc?

Everybody wants to compare them. They are all good and have advantages and disadvantages depending on use and rules. It is like comparing hockey to baseball-which is better?


Is it a good thing for kids?

Yes-the best. Come try it.
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