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Emmanuel Diaz

Space Exploration  - 
 
Tony Antonelli spent 24 days in space as a shuttle pilot, working on building the International Space Station. Now, he’s the chief technologist for Lockheed Martin’s civil exploration division. And he’s working on building the next space station,
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G. Michael Williams's profile photo
 
No. Cosmic radiation hasn't been solved. 
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Zain Talib

Space Exploration  - 
 
The Boss Great Wall
... The largest Structure of the Universe Discovered Yet ..
This Super Structure Comprises At Least 830 Galaxies And Measures One Year Billion Light Year Accross..
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m.saiful Islam's profile photoG. Michael Williams's profile photo
15 comments
 
+m.saiful Islam self serving nonsense with no history of success. 
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Ciro Villa
owner

Space Exploration  - 
 
 
Former astronaut Scott Kelly held the record for most cumulative time in space by a NASA astronaut — 520 days — before Expedition 48 Commander Jeff Williams broke that today. Williams will have a record 534 cumulative days by the time he lands Sept. 6 in Kazakhstan. Kelly still holds the record ...
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J. C. Bueno

Space Exploration  - 
 
 
Say what you think or expect. #JourneyToMars
I was at a speech the other day spoken by an engineer from NASA itself, and he was saying we'll have boots on the ground by 2020 – I find this ridiculous! But it is nevertheless a very interesting topic ~~ all things considered, when will we send the first man (or woman to Mars)?
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James Evans's profile photoAdam Synergy's profile photo
6 comments
 
The biggest stumbling block right now is a lack of EDL (entry/descent/landing) technology that can deliver around 20-40 metric tonnes of astronauts, habitats,, food, supplies etc..
JPL did a fantastic job of landing the 1000 kg Curiosity Rover but landing much heavier payloads requires much more fuel and any return trip back to Earth will require making more fuel on Mars.
We have a long way to go but I'm very pleased that +NASA and +SpaceX have agreed to share data on projects that will eventually get boots on the Red Planet.
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Thorfinn Hrolfsson

Space Exploration  - 
 
by University College London.
Extensive systems of fossilised riverbeds have been discovered on an ancient region of the Martian surface, supporting the idea that the now cold and dry Red Planet had a warm and wet climate about 4 billion years ago, according to UCL-led research.

The study, published in Geology and funded by the Science & Technology Facilities Council and the UK Space Agency, identified over 17,000km of former river channels on a northern plain called Arabia Terra, providing further evidence of water once flowing on Mars.

"Climate models of early Mars predict rain in Arabia Terra and until now there was little geological evidence on the surface to support this theory. This led some to believe that Mars was never warm and wet but was a largely frozen planet, covered in ice-sheets and glaciers. We've now found evidence of extensive river systems in the area which supports the idea that Mars was warm and wet, providing a more favourable environment for life than a cold, dry planet," explained lead author, Joel Davis (UCL Earth Sciences).

Since the 1970s, scientists have identified valleys and channels on Mars which they think were carved out and eroded by rain and surface runoff, just like on Earth. Similar structures had not been seen on Arabia Terra until the team analysed high resolution imagery from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft.

Journal Reference:
J.M. Davis, M. Balme, P.M. Grindrod, R.M.E. Williams, and S. Gupta. Extensive Noachian fluvial systems in Arabia Terra: Implications for early Martian climate. Geology, 2016
http://dx.doi.org/10.1130/G38247.1
Extensive systems of fossilized riverbeds have been discovered on an ancient region of the Martian surface, supporting the idea that the now cold and dry Red Planet had a warm and wet climate about 4 billion years ago, according to UCL-led research.
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Martin Jankov

Space Exploration  - 
 
In 1977, Voyager 1 and 2 were launched. Their primary mission was to visit Jupiter and Saturn.Voyager 2 continued onto Uranus and Neptune; Voyager 1 has...
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Alexander Fretheim's profile photorich jay's profile photo
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Thorfinn Hrolfsson

Space Exploration  - 
 
by University of Sheffield.
The analysis of high-frequency surface air temperature, mean sea-level pressure, wind speed and direction and cloud-cover data from the solar eclipse of 20 March 2015 from the UK, Faroe Islands and Iceland, published today (Monday 22 August 2016), sheds new light on the phenomenon.
The research, led by Professor Edward Hanna, of the University of Sheffield’s Department of Geography, used data from 76 UK Met Office weather stations, 30 weather stations in the Faroe Islands and 148 stations in Iceland.
There was a statistically significant mean UK temperature drop of 0.83±0.63 degrees Celsius, which occurred over 39 minutes on average, and the minimum temperature lagged the peak of the eclipse by about ten minutes.
For a subset of 14 relatively clear (cloudy) stations, the mean temperature drop was 0.91± 0.78 (0.31±0.40)degC, but the mean temperature drops for relatively calm and windy stations were almost identical, indicating that cloud cover has a much greater effect than wind on the air temperature's response to an eclipse.
The average wind speed dropped significantly by 9 per cent on average during the first half of the eclipse, in line with previous studies.
There was no detectable effect of the eclipse on the wind-direction or barometric pressure time series, and therefore we can discount any localised change in air circulation over Britain (for example, the much-fabled 'eclipse cyclone') during this event.
Similar changes in air temperature and wind speed were observed for Iceland, where conditions were generally clearer, but there is no evidence of the eclipse cyclone.
In the Faroes, there was a much more muted meteorological signature.
Journal Reference:
Hanna, Edward; Penman, John; Jonsson, Trausti; Bigg, Grant; Bjornsson, Halldor; Sjuroarson, Solvi; Hansen, Mads; Cappelen, John; Bryant, Robert. Meteorological effects of the solar eclipse of 20 March 2015 - analysis of UK, Faroes and Iceland automatic weather station data. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A, 2016
http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsta.2015.0212
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Iftekharul Bashar

Space Exploration  - 
 
Yearlong Mars simulation nears end on Mauna Loa...
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Martin Jankov

Space Exploration  - 
The distant planet (exoplanet) GJ 1132b intrigued astronomers when it was discovered last year. Located just 39 light-years from Earth, it might have an...
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Thorfinn Hrolfsson

Space Exploration  - 
 
National Centre for Atmospheric Research
On Thanksgiving Day in 2013, solar scientists, astronomers, and amateur sky watchers alike pointed their instruments at the Sun and waited. 
Comet ISON, a bright ball of frozen matter from the earliest days of the universe, was inbound from the Oort Cloud at the edge of the solar system and expected to pierce the Sun's corona on Nov. 28. Scientists were expecting quite a show.  But instead of a brilliant cosmic display, there was … nothing.

"The first thing we did was make sure that we had definitely seen nothing," said Paul Bryans, a solar scientist at the National Centre for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), who was looking for the comet using NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory. "We did image processing just to make sure nothing was there, and it wasn't. But that's not necessarily a boring result. That can tell us something."

And it has. Bryans and colleague Dean Pesnell, of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Centre, recently published a study that sheds light on the mystery of Comet ISON.

Journal Reference:
Paul Bryans, W. Dean Pesnell. ON THE ABSENCE OF EUV EMISSION FROM COMET C/2012 S1 (ISON). The Astrophysical Journal, 2016; 822 (2): 77
http://dx.doi.org/10.3847/0004-637X/822/2/77
July 25, 2016 | On Thanksgiving Day in 2013, solar scientists, astronomers, and amateur skywatchers alike pointed their instruments at the Sun and waited. Comet ISON, a bright ball of frozen matter from the earliest days of the universe, was inbound from the Oort Cloud at the edge of the solar ...
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Thorfinn Hrolfsson

Space Exploration  - 
 
by Yale University.
For decades, it has been thought that the key factor in determining whether a planet can support life was its distance from its sun. In our solar system, for instance, Venus is too close to the sun and Mars is too far, but Earth is just right. That distance is what scientists refer to as the "habitable zone," or the "Goldilocks zone."

It also was thought that planets were able to self-regulate their internal temperature via mantle convection -- the underground shifting of rocks caused by internal heating and cooling. A planet might start out too cold or too hot, but it would eventually settle into the right temperature.
A new study, appearing in the journal Science Advances on Aug. 19, suggests that simply being in the habitable zone isn't sufficient to support life. A planet also must start with an internal temperature that is just right.

Journal Reference:
Jun Korenaga. Can mantle convection be self-regulated? Science Advances, August 2016
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.1601168
The search for habitable, alien worlds needs to make room for a second “Goldilocks,” according to a Yale University researcher.
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Adam Synergy
moderator

Space Exploration  - 
 
Dione
This image looking towards the trailing hemisphere of Saturn's moon Dione was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft's narrow-angle camera (NAC) on April 11th 2015.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute
 
A Moon's Contrast
Dione reveals its past via contrasts in this view from NASA's Cassini spacecraft. The features visible here are a mixture of tectonics -- the bright, linear features -- and impact cratering -- the round features, which are spread across the entire surface.

Tectonic features tell the story of how Dione (698 miles or 1,123 kilometers across) has been heated and cooled since its formation, and scientists use those clues to piece together the moon's past. Impact craters are evidence of external debris striking the surface, and thus they tell about the environment in which the moon has existed over its history.
full details https://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/resources/7482/
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Sounds from Titan, Venus (Soviet Probe Venera 14), Mars and Earth
 ·  Translate
Sounds from Titan, Venus (Soviet Probe Venera 14), Mars and Earth Звуки из Титан, Венеры (советский зонд Венера14), Марс и Земля - SOVIET SPACE PROGRAM (Космическая программа СССР) - Google+
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Brian Si

Space Exploration  - 
 
 
Too bad that it appears to be tidally locked.

Earth-like planet found orbiting the star next door
http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/earth-like-planet-proxima-centauri-1.3733882

After scanning the vast reaches of the cosmos for Earth-like planets where life might exist, astronomers have found one right next door.
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Gord Davison's profile photoBrian Si's profile photo
4 comments
 
+Gord Davison I agree it's not absolute. The science regarding exoplanets is pretty much guess work at this point.
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Adam Synergy
moderator

Space Exploration  - 
 
NIAC Symposium 2016
On the hottest day so far in my corner of England, I'm keeping cool watching some awesome presentations showing the different ways in which we're going to explore the solar system.
NIAC Symposium by National Institute of Aerospace on livestream.com
NASA's Innovative Advanced Concepts program seeks to examine technically credible advanced concepts that could help advance what is currently possible in our attempts to explore the solar system.
NIAC is a component of the Space Technology Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC. USA.
Watch National Institute of Aerospace's 2016 NIAC Symposium on Livestream.com. The NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) Program nurtures visionary ideas that could transform future NASA missions with the creation of breakthroughs — radically better or entirely new aerospace concepts — while engaging America's innovators and entrepreneurs as partners in the journey.
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Bryan M

Space Exploration  - 
 
 
We're discussing futuristic space exploration concepts & you can listen in on these talks: http://go.nasa.gov/2bkkHCq
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Baohua Tang's profile photoJonathan S.N.'s profile photo
3 comments
 
+Baohua Tang​ Yeah! It's Venus.
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It could be the first time we've found oxygen on an exoplanet.
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Alexander Fretheim's profile photoExtraterrestrial Biological Entity's profile photo
2 comments
 
+Alexander Fretheim life forms that are suitable for a hotter environment can exist on this planet.
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visarg Acharya

Space Exploration  - 
Hello and welcome all! "I come in peace from all mankind". You must be thinking that why am I telling this line but actually the plate of appolo 11 left on moon had these words written on it in case, if any alien finds it! Bu...
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REY TORRES

Space Exploration  - 
 
Spectacular Aurora Australis
ISS032-E-007896 (15 July 2012) -- The Expedition 32 crew onboard the International Space Station, flying an altitude of approximately 240 miles, recorded a series of images of Aurora Australis, also known as the Southern Lights, on July 15.
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NASA is preparing to launch its first mission to return a sample of an asteroid to Earth. The mission will help scientists investigate how planets formed and how life began, as well as improve our understanding of asteroids that could impact Earth.
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