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Thorfinn Hrolfsson

Space Exploration  - 
 
Geologists who analyzed 40 meteorites that fell to Earth from Mars unlocked secrets of the Martian atmosphere hidden in the chemical signatures of these ancient rocks. Their study, published April 17 in the journal Nature, shows that the atmospheres of Mars and Earth diverged in important ways very early in the 4.6 billion year evolution of our solar system.

The results will help guide researchers’ next steps in understanding whether life exists, or has ever existed, on Mars and how water—now absent from the Martian surface—flowed there in the past.
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Jason Higley

Space Exploration  - 
 
"...the first U.S. mission to collect samples from an asteroid has been given the go-ahead to begin building the spacecraft, flight instruments, ground system, and launch support facilities."
 
NASA's team, which includes SETI Institute senior scientist John Marshall, that will conduct the first U.S. mission to collect samples from an asteroid has been given the go-ahead to begin building the spacecraft, flight instruments, ground system, and launch support facilities. OSIRIS-REx is scheduled to launch in the fall of 2016, rendezvous with the asteroid Bennu in 2018 and return a sample of it to Earth in 2023.

More here: http://buff.ly/P1mjng
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Nacim Boukhedimi's profile photo
 
Je souhaiterais voir que l'espèce humaine se tourne vers l'exploration pas à faire des guerres entre eux 
 ·  Translate
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Miguel Valentin

Space Exploration  - 
 
 
What Earth Objects are Visible from Space?

It has long been said that the Great Wall of China can be seen from the moon. No untruer words have ever been spoken, but can you see it from the International Space Station?

And if so, what else can be seen (plus, see a slideshow of incredible images of Earth from space)? http://goo.gl/N4eRXs

Image: The Grand Canyon From Space (Credit: NASA)
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Mike Mosher's profile photoWK Chan's profile photoMiguel Valentin's profile photoDale Howson's profile photo
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This looks....
A) Shopped
B) Artist Rendition
C) Both A and B
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Don't miss out. Watch it live on +NASA It already started turning orange. #orangemoon   #lunareclipse   http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html#.U0zT21WSzDw
 
Stay up all night with us to watch the total lunar #eclipse! You can view and learn more about the eclipse on NASA television. Coverage begins at 2 a.m. EDT and will last about three hours. The eclipse’s peak, when the moon will enter the Earth's full shadow or umbra, will occur at 3:45 a.m. Live NASA TV coverage and commentary will begin at 1 a.m. To view the coverage and access eclipse streaming video, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv
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Dwight Aceves's profile photoUDDIPTA BHUYAN's profile photoSamuel Sloan's profile photo
3 comments
 
Just finished watching it from our dining room sliding glass window for the last 2hrs.  Absolutely a thing a beauty.
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Thomas Grounds

Space Exploration  - 
 
SpaceX Rocket Launch Scrubbed Due To Helium Leak
As reported by CBS News: Launch of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying a Dragon cargo capsule bound for the International Space Station was scrubbed Monday afternoon because of an apparent first stage helium leak. A new launch ...
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Thomas Grounds's profile photoMark Ruhland's profile photo
3 comments
 
+Thomas Grounds I just had to put a jacket on after reading your post...(-452 F)... Brrr!!!
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Follow the SpaceX CRS-3 launch LIVE on line, 4:58 p.m. EDT (2058 GMT) today, April 14

http://www.spaceflightinsider.com/live-mission-monitor/
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Glenn Walsh

Space Exploration  - 
 
NASA Explains "Flash" on Mars Surface

A leader of NASA's Mars Curiosity rover team has offered a couple of explanations for an anomalous bright spot that showed up on pictures from the Red Planet — but they're not the conventional explanations.

http://spacewatchtower.blogspot.com/2014/04/nasa-explains-flash-on-mars-surface.html

2014: 75th Year of Pittsburgh's Buhl Planetarium
A bright spot shows up in Curiosity's right-hand navigation camera image from April 2. (Image Source: NASA) By Alan Boyle A leader of NASA's Mars Curiosity rover team has offered a couple of explanations for an anomalous brig...
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Paulo Antunes's profile photoJoseph Hurlburt's profile photo
 
Now if they just drive the rover over there and be truthful as to what they find !.   You know I saw something like this in the hills of Utah, and after a real long hike, I found a large piece of Mica, along with hundreds of smaller fragments, Just a nice mineral find in the end. But I think there is allot more to this Mars than we are being told.
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dipti n

Space Exploration  - 
 
 
The Rosette Nebula, Up Close
This is a close up view of an interesting area inside the Rosette Nebula. NGC 2237 is a large, circular hydrogen region located near one end of a giant molecular cloud in the Monoceros region of the Milky Way Galaxy. The open cluster, NGC 2244, is closely associated with the nebulosity, the stars having been formed from the nebula's matter. The Nebula is about 100 light-years across and is about 5000 light-years away. North is to the left.
 
The image was created using the Hubble palette, with SII, Ha and OIII filters mapped to red, green and blue respectively. The colors were then adjusted to create the blue and gold motif, made popular by the Hubble Imaging Team.
 
Taken from 2/10/2011 to 3/28/2011 in Chino Valley, AZ
RCOS 12.5" Ritchey-Chrétien w/ an SBIG STL-11000 camera using Astrodon filters.
Exposure Details:
SII 690 min. (23 x 30 min.)
Ha 570 min. (19 x 30 min.)
OIII 630 min. (21 x 30 min.)
Original size = 3840 x 2560

Credit & Copyright: Astrophotographer Bob Franke

#Space #Astronomy #Nebula #Rosette #NGC2237 #NGC2244 #Monoceros #Stars #Galaxy #MilkyWay #Astrophotography #Astronomer #Cosmos  #Universe
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"What Universe Is This, Anyway? by Marcelo Gleiser
(article excerpt) "Let's take a walk on the wild side and assume, for the sake of argument, that our universe is not the only one; let's say there are many others, possibly infinitely many, "out there." The totality of this bizarre ensemble is what cosmologists call the "multiverse," a hypothesis that sounds more mythic than scientific, a conceptual troublemaker that inspires some and outrages others." - Marcelo Gleiser

Full story via link in box
Evidence of ultra-fast cosmic expansion forces us to confront the possibility that the multiverse exists. But how will we ever know? It's a problem that could leave us tangled up in knots.
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NASA-funded researchers have spotted the first signs of an "exomoon," and though they say it's impossible to confirm its presence, the finding is a tantalizing first step toward locating others. The discovery was made by watching a chance encounter of objects in our galaxy, which can be witnessed only once.
"We won't have a chance to observe the exomoon candidate again," said David Bennett of the University of Notre Dame, Ind., lead author of a new paper on the findings appearing in the Astrophysical Journal. "But we can expect more unexpected finds like this."
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Jaime Silva

Space Exploration  - 
 
Going to Mars

The total journey time from Earth to Mars takes between 150-300 days depending on the speed of the launch, the alignment of Earth and Mars, and the length of the journey the spacecraft takes to reach its target. It really just depends on how much fuel you’re willing to burn to get there. More fuel, shorter travel time.

more on:
http://www.universetoday.com/14841/how-long-does-it-take-to-get-to-mars/
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Mark Ruhland's profile photo
 
I wanna go back home... Great photo!!!
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Miguel Valentin

Space Exploration  - 
 
 
Animation of Lunar Eclipse

Last night we had an amazing live-broadcast of the #LunarEclipse  over at +Space Fan News!

Joining me was +Katie Mack, +David Dickinson, and +Thad Szabo as we streamed live views of the #Eclipse  from Florida, Los Angeles and Melbourne, Australia! Plus Thad even brought in Mars and Saturn into the broadcast!

On top of the live stream, many Space Fans from across the globe were sharing their views with us, including +Jeff Tropeano from the +Denver Astronomical Society. He gave me a time-lapse of his observation of the eclipse and I've turned it into this awesome animation of the event. 

If you didn't get to watch it live, the recorded version can be found here: Lunar Eclipse Live! 

Thank you all for joining us and, as always, Keep Looking Up!

#ScienceEveryday   #Space   #Astronomy   #BloodMoon   #Moon  
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Randall Bateman's profile photoLaura Hoot's profile photo
 
End of days. hahhaa just kidding. very cool. the Blood Moon is beautiful not scary and apocalypse-bringing.
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Mett Met

Space Exploration  - 
 
Italian female Astronaut, Samantha Christoforetti's, preparations continue..
 
L-223: Logbook

Today I took a ride on the impressive 18-meter-arm Star City centrifuge.

As a preparation for the upcoming manual reentry exam, I had a dry-run today in which we went through a typical exam session: three reentry scenarios with the running centrifuge with two static scenarios to rest in between.

I've talked a little bit here about how manual reentry works:
https://plus.google.com/+SamanthaCristoforetti/posts/QKopRJB2MJu

The goal is to land within 10 km from the nominal touchdown point - the one that the computer-controlled reentry would fly us to, if it worked. But it's also important to keep the Gs under control. Especially if we're trying to compensate an overshoot in the time we made contact with the atmosphere (i.e. we made contact later than planned), the temptation is to give inputs that will lead to huge G-loads in an attempt to correct back. In an exam setting that will affect the score, but in real life, as well as in the centrifuge, it also affects one's level of discomfort and pain. Let's say it's a self-punishing mistake! 

Under heavy G-loads it is quite difficult to move at all. Luckily, to fly the reentry we only need to press two buttons, the ones under my thumbs in the picture. Those inputs change the roll angle of the descent module in discrete increments of 15°, roll being the rotation around the axis of symmetry. It's not very intuitive, but the roll affects the lift, so that we can control how steep or shallow we want to fly. (For those we want to try to figure it out, here's a hint: the center of mass of the vehicle is displaced with respect to the axis of symmetry).

If you want to know more about riding the centrifuge, here's an older blog post about it:
http://blogs.esa.int/astronauts/2013/07/22/a-ride-in-the-worlds-biggest-centrifuge/


#SamLogbook  #Futura

(Trad IT)  Traduzione in italiano a cura di  +AstronautiNEWS  qui:
http://www.astronautinews.it/tag/logbook/

(Trad ES) Tradducción en español aquí:
http://www.intervidia.com/category/bitacora/

(Trad FR) Traduction en français par  +Anne Cpamoa  ici:
 https://spacetux.org/cpamoa/category/traductions/logbook-samantha/ 
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While astronomers look at the lunar eclipse (already started) : A whole new drama is ongoing. NASA's  LADEE may well crash into the moon soon, or may get affected by the lunar eclipse and it's propulsion system could freeze and burst. Though current predictions are that it will survive. Scientists know that LADEE's days are numbered. But it has already achieved it's mission profile. (See more on the eclipse here from +NASA : http://goo.gl/pXBsyL )

Article Extract: Scientists have no delusions about the fate of NASA's LADEE robotic probe, which has been exploring the shroud of dust and the trace gases that surround the Moon. On April 21, if not sooner, the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer will crash into the surface of the Moon and vaporise. But before its demise, scientists hope to break new ground by flying LADEE literally just above the ground. "There is a chance that we could clip a mountain accidentally, but the risk is pretty low for that. And really, the value of the science that we can do with this attempt is worth this risk," says project manager Butler Hine, with NASA's Ames Research Center in Moffett Field.

Beginning this weekend, LADEE will begin dropping its altitude until it ends up less than 3 kilometres above the lunar surface. Ramming into a lunar mountain isn't the only danger ahead. LADEE faces a prolonged period of potentially deadly cold during an eclipse on 15 April. Engineers warn the spacecraft's propulsion system could freeze and burst, though current predictions indicate LADEE will survive.

Article Link: http://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2014/04/07/3979758.htm

NASA FAQs : http://www.nasa.gov/content/frequently-asked-questions-ladee-planned-impact/#.U0zoOFfQ6bg

Earlier post on the Laser communications test with LADEE: http://goo.gl/weMYRK

LADEE's communication record: http://www.nbcnews.com/science/space/zap-ladees-laser-breaks-space-communication-record-f8C11453570

+Wikipedia link on LADEE: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lunar_Atmosphere_and_Dust_Environment_Explorer

Pics courtesy: Main pic from Wikipedia link, Pic top right from nbcnews link, Pic middle right from LADEE Mission Overview, Pic bottom right from http://goo.gl/OHyG3F

#space #moon #LADEE #lunareclipse
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Miguel Valentin

Space Exploration  - 
 
 
Nuclear Bombs and Shuttles: The Plausibility of propelling a Craft by Nuclear Explosions

As I'm sure you're all aware, we have a lot of nuclear weapons on our little world. Nuclear weapons are also a pretty scary thing, especially as countries who, shall we say, "don't like eachother" gain the formidable weapon. Fortunately, disarmament has made a little progress, but instead of just dismantling these weapons, could we put them to better use? For science and the exploration of the galaxy?

To learn more about propelling spaceships with nukes, see: http://www.fromquarkstoquasars.com/nuclear-bombs-and-shuttles-the-plausibility-of-propelling-a-craft-by-nuclear-explosions/
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Kyle Danner's profile photoMark Ruhland's profile photo
2 comments
 
Dilithium crystals... We need them, now.
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NASA: SpaceX launch scrubbed today due to #Falcon 9 first stage helium leak. Next opportunity is Friday at 3:25pm ET.
Credit: NASA
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Miguel Valentin

Space Exploration  - 
 
 
Failed Space Station Computer Spurs Contingency Spacewalk Plans

NASA is preparing a contingency spacewalk to deal with a broken backup computer component on the International Space Station, the agency said in an update Saturday (April 12). While there’s no timeline yet for the spacewalk, the agency must consider carefully when to do it given a cargo ship is supposed to arrive at station on Wednesday.

Read more: http://www.universetoday.com/111172/failed-space-station-computer-spurs-contingency-spacewalk-plans/#ixzz2yhSdBWmd
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(Click to enlarge picture...) Astronomers, for the first time, discover a moon orbiting around an exoplanet, in the MOA-2011-BLG-262 system, using telescopes in New Zealand and the Australian state...
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Karin Lisa Atkinson

Space Exploration  - 
 
"Is Time Real?", "Time Reborn" by Lee Smolin 
"We live in a universe that is always changing, full of matter that is always moving." - Lee Smolin

(article extract) We physicists are all romantics. Don't laugh; it's true. In our youth we all fall deeply in love. We fall in love with a beautiful idea: beyond this world of constant change lies another world that is perfect and timeless.

This eternal domain is made not of matter or energy. It's made from perfect, timeless mathematical laws. Finding those exquisite eternal laws — or better yet, a single timeless formula for everything — is the Holy Grail we dedicate our lives to.

Unless we lose faith in that Grail. That's what's happened to physicist Lee Smolin, author of the new book "Time Reborn". As he puts it:

"I used to think my job as a theoretical physicist was to find that formula. Now I see my faith in its existence as a kind of mysticism."

For Smolin there is no timeless world and there are no timeless laws. Time, he says, is real and nothing can escape it."

Time, of course, seems real to us. We live in and through time. But to physicists, time's fundamental reality is an illusion.

Full article and Audio of article
http://www.npr.org/blogs/13.7/2013/05/02/180037757/is-time-real

Lee Smolin website: eesmolin.com
http://timereborn.com/wp/about-lee-smolin/biography

Lee Smolin is a theoretical physicist who has been since 2001 a founding and senior faculty member at Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics. His main contributions have been so far to the quantum theory of gravity, to which he has been a co-inventor and major contributor to two major directions, loop quantum gravity and deformed special relativity.

He also contributes to cosmology, through his proposal of cosmological natural selection: a falsifiable mechanism to explain the choice of the laws of physics.

He has also contributed to quantum field theory, the foundations of quantum mechanics, theoretical biology, the philosophy of science and economics.

He is the author of more than 150 scientific papers and numerous essays and writings for the public on science.

He also has written four books which explore philosophical issues raised by contemporary physics and cosmology. These are "Life of the Cosmos" (1997), "Three Roads to Quantum Gravity" (2001), "The Trouble with Physics" (2006) and "Time Reborn" (2013).

Born in New York City, Smolin attended Hampshire College and Harvard University. After postdocs at IAS Princeton, ITP Santa Barbara, and the University of Chicago he held faculty positions at Yale, Syracuse and Penn State University.

A Fellow of the American Physical Society and of the Royal Society of Canada, Smolin was awarded the 2009 Klopsteg Memorial Award from the American Association of Physics Teachers and in 2008 was voted 21st on a list of the 100 most influential public intellectuals by Prospect and Foreign Policy Magazines.

He is also adjunct professor of physics at the University of Waterloo and a member of the graduate faculty of the philosophy department at the University of Toronto.
Time is special. How we see it helps determine how we see the rest of the Universe. Physicist Lee Smolin has a new book out that says we've been looking at time the wrong way. Adam Frank digs in and offers his own perspective on Smolin's argument.
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Miguel Valentin

Space Exploration  - 
 
 
Rogue Planets - Free floating planets in the Milky Way outnumber stars by the  thousands, and among them life-bearing planets may exist in large numbers. According to a recent report, for every star in our galaxy a few thousand dimly-lit icy planets could exist in interstellar space and harbor life.  

A few hundred thousand billion free-floating life-bearing Earth-sized planets may exist in the space between stars in the Milky Way. So argues an international team of scientists led by Professor Chandra Wickramasinghe, Director of the Buckingham Centre for Astrobiology at the University of Buckingham, UK. 
[…]
The scientists have proposed that these life-bearing planets originated in the early Universe within a few million years of the Big Bang, and that they make up most of the so-called “missing mass” of galaxies.  
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Sam Flowers's profile photoNorbert Sprenger's profile photoGermaine VANGUARD's profile photo
3 comments
 
Always found the idea of a rouge planet fascinating! 
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