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karthik subramanian

Space Exploration  - 
 
Longing to go beyond the horizon #Curiosity rover
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Fidem Turbāre

Space Exploration  - 
 
 
"What NASA's (+NASA) New Mars Video Means for the Future of Virtual Reality:  Virtual reality experiences on Mars--and other planets--may be the first small step toward interplanetary life" by Graham Winfrey (+Graham Winfrey).

[Caption with featured image:  "NASA's Curiosity Rover on the surface of Mars.  IMAGE: NASA."]

Direct link to 3D video referenced in the attached article:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ME_T4B1rxCg

From the attached article...

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Finally: You now can explore the surface of Mars without ever leaving Earth. 

NASA released a 360-degree video from the surface of Mars Monday that lets viewers poke around the Martian surface. It's an eye-opening experience that makes it hard not to think about the possibilities of touring the planet in virtual reality someday soon. (It may not be as entertaining as the recent Matt Damon film The Martian, but at least you'd be seeing the real planet.)

NASA first published the video on Facebook on January 30, but the way the Curiosity Rover's still images were stitched together gave the video a fish-eye appearance that made the planet unrecognizable, TechCrunch reports. The revised version released Monday lets you take in the view of Mars's Namib Dune and Mount Sharp in a way that makes it feel like you're standing on the planet. 

Check out the click-and-drag video below for a mini virtual tour of Curiosity Rover's surroundings.

[See attached article for 3D video footage, and the remaining paragraphs...]
Virtual reality experiences on Mars--and other planets--may be the first small step toward interplanetary life.
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Isaias Echevarria

Space Exploration  - 
 
 
The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has captured this vivid image of the startlingly symmetrical nebula Hen 2-437.
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Omar Hussein

Space Exploration  - 
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Mike Raven

Space Exploration  - 
 
NEW Mission Profile Category added.

First mission posted is Mariner 2, the first spacecraft to successfully reach another planet.

You can see it here:

http://ravenskullherald.com/mission-mariner2.php
SUMMARY: Mariner 2 was one of a pair of spacecraft who, authorized by NASA in August 1961, were to flyby Venus and take scientific measurements. Mariner 1 and 2 were not equipped with a camera but instead with sensors like the Solar Plasma Spectrometer, Three-axis Fluxgate Magnetometer, ...
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Mehwish Moiz

Space Exploration  - 
 
 
"Rose of Heaven" by Will Vrbasso (www.stellaraustralis.com)

This is my image of the Rosette Nebula taken a couple of nights ago. This nebula is around 5000ly from earth, and is a haven for new born stars. Whilst the cluster of stars is easily visible with binoculars, the nebula itself can only be viewed with long exposure photography.

This image is stacked using 12 subs, 21 dark frames, and 21 bias frames. Dew was a major issue being a hot humid night so I had to be quick. I managed to get some other targets in this night but they were all a bit "foggy". Time to by some dew heaters me thinks...

Enjoy, Will.

PS: all my images are available to download on my website at www.stellaraustralis.com.

For those interested in the image detail, read as follows:

DATE / TIME: 2016-01-05
LOCATION: Near Gingin, Western Australia
SCOPE: Skywatcher 120ED Esprit
OPTICAL ATTACHMENTS: field flattner at prime focus
MOUNT: Skywatcher NEQ6 with Synguider on a 80mm Refractor 
CAMERA: Canon EOS6D unmodded
EXPOSURE: 12 x ISO1600 @ 297 sec each, 21 x dark frames, 21 x bias frames
PROCESSING: DeepSkyStacker
POST-PROCESSING: Photoshop

#rosette   #nebula   #stars   #space   #astrophotography   #nightphotography   #longexposure   #vrbasso   #stellaraustralis  
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Rahul kumar jaiswal

Space Exploration  - 
 
what it should be ? comment me fast

The Moon or Mars? NASA Must Pick 1 Goal for Astronauts, Experts Tell Congress
http://www.space.com/31835-nasa-needs-single-mission-goal-congress.html?cmpid=514630_20160205_57981056&adbid=10153292297621466&adbpl=fb&adbpr=17610706465
NASA can't afford to put humans on Mars while also pursuing missions to put astronauts back on the moon, a panel of experts told Congress.
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Nick Dundee's profile photocolin johnson's profile photoMAN OF STEEL's profile photoPeter Zsurka's profile photo
38 comments
 
+Robena Pjetrani So that's why we need to visit them 
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Mehwish Moiz

Space Exploration  - 
 
 
Adding a new dimension to the early chemistry of the Solar System

Using sophisticated computer simulations, an international research team has discovered new insights into the chemical composition of the dust grains that formed in the solar system 4.5 billion years ago. Researchers from Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne and the University of Lyon, France, calculated a two-dimensional map of the dust chemistry in the solar nebula, the thin dusty disk that surrounded the young sun and out of which the planets formed. They analyzed the distribution of refractories (high temperature materials) and volatile materials (such as ices and sulphur compounds) in this solar nebula.

Full story here:
http://www.swinburne.edu.au/news/latest-news/2016/02/adding-a-new-dimension-to-the-early-chemistry-of-the-solar-system.php

More on the formation and evolution of the Solar System:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Formation_and_evolution_of_the_Solar_System

Image credit: This artist's concept illustrates a solar system that is a much younger version of our own. Dusty disks, like the one shown here circling the star, are thought to be the breeding grounds of planets, including rocky ones like Earth. NASA/JPL-Caltech http://goo.gl/uaNK8l

#science   #astrophysics   #solarsystem   #solarnebula   #planetformation   #space   #planetarysystem  
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2 comments
 
the desert on a whispery night
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Karin Lisa Atkinson

Space Exploration  - 
 
Cool Cosmos is a NASA education and outreach website for infrared astronomy and related topics, with information on all NASA-involved infrared missions, including the Spitzer Space Telescope, the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), Herschel, Planck, the 2-Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS), the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST/AFTA), and Euclid. This site is hosted at IPAC (Infrared Processing and Analysis Center), and funded by NASA's Spitzer Science Center, at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

IPAC was founded in 1985 to support the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) mission, which provided the first space-based survey of the infrared sky. Subsequently IPAC's role expanded to include science operations, data archives, and community support for ten astronomy and planetary science missions, with a special emphasis on infrared-submillimeter astronomy and exoplanet science.  IPAC also operates several data archives, including those enabling research in infrared astronomy (IRSA), exoplanets (NASA Exoplanet Archive), and extragalactic astronomy (NED).

Cool Cosmos was established as a public portal to explore the many facets of the world and universe as seen through the marvels of infrared light. In light of the many advancements in infrared astronomy, infrared technology, and web technology the site was rebuilt and relaunched in 2013 to provide the best outreach and educational experiences for both desktop and mobile browsers.

While much of the content from the original Cool Cosmos site has migrated to this new version, many smaller sections and older images were dropped in favor of a more easily navigated site with a clearer focus. Infrared images have been reshot using better infrared cameras and released at higher resolutions than possible before. However, the legacy Cool Cosmos site has been preserved for access to older content.

Why "Cool Cosmos"?
The name of the site reflects some of the core science ideas incorporated into the content. Everything in the universe radiates light. But where that light falls in the spectrum depends on the temperature.

Very hot objects like our Sun, or the filament in a light bulb, glow most brightly in the visible part of the spectrum. However, for objects at cooler temperatures, ranging from normal human body temperatures down to dust clouds ten or twenty degrees above absolute zero, the corresponding light is emitted only in the infrared and submillimeter part of the spectrum.

Thus in a very real sense, the "cool cosmos" is something best studied in infrared light.
Cool Cosmos is NASA's infrared education and outreach website, with information for all NASA-involved infrared missions, including the Spitzer Space Telescope, WISE, the Herschel Space Observatory, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), SOFIA, 2MASS, WFIRST, Euclid and SPICA. This site is hosted at the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC), and funded by NASA's Spitzer Science Center, based on the campus of the California Institute of Te...
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Paolo Marini

Space Exploration  - 
 
Leading the way for finding Earth 2.0 is Sara Seager, a researcher / professor at MIT studying the atmosphere of exoplanets. Get to know her better in this personal interview (where the person asking the questions sounds just a little weird - I'm only joking...). We are counting on you to travel far, Sara!
http://youtu.be/lnToq84Q8qQ
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Akshay Dixit

Space Exploration  - 
 
(Representative image) Scientists have discovered hundreds of galaxies just 250 million light years away from Earth which had been hidden from view until now by our Milky Way galaxy. MELBOURNE: Scientists have discovered hun...
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Jan Holmgård @ edugalaxen

Space Exploration  - 
 
While the Mobile Asteroid Surface Scout-1, MASCOT-,1, which was launched December 3rd, on board Japan's Hayabusa 2 mission and about to reach its target asteroid in 2018, the MASCOT-2 is already under study!
Read about ESA's AIM and NASA's DART missions - together named AIDA.

ESAs projekt AIM siktar in farkost nummer två! Den första sonden, MASCOT-1 är beräknad att nå "sin" asteroid 2018. Mascotarna ska kartlägga asteroiderna inför NASAs projekt, Dart.
Dessa två projekt går under samarbetsnamnet AIDA.

#ESA   #NASA   #AIM   #DART   #AIDA   #Mascot2   #Hayabusa   #asteroid   #landing  
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This is the micro-lander that ESA’s proposed Asteroid Impact Mission would put down on its target asteroid.The asteroid body in question is just 170 m in diameter – the smaller body of the binary Didymos system – so roughly the same size as the Great Pyramid of Giza. It orbits just 1.2 km…
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F-1 Rocket engine. Five of these powered the Saturn V first stage and developed a total lift-off thrust of 7.6 million pounds during the first four and a half minutes of flight.
We saw this on display at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Mississippi, now closed for public tours. I believe most of the displays were moved over to the INFINITY Science Center - just across from Stennis on the south side of I-10.
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Adam Synergy
moderator

Space Exploration  - 
 
 
Curiosity Rover At Namib Dune 360
Check out this stunning 360 degree panorama of NASA's robotic Martian geologist at Namib Dune, Gale Crater.
Curiosity's MAHLI hand lens camera acquired around forty individual images which have been stitched together to create this stunning vista.
Using my I-pad I'm able to pan around the rover's surroundings and zoom-in on features like Mount Sharp in the background.
Image Credit : NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS.
http://youtu.be/ME_T4B1rxCg
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zinnia Molin's profile photoSyam akhil Repalle's profile photoJames Scott's profile photo
 
amazing
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Ravi Kannaujiya

Space Exploration  - 
 
 
Gravitational Lensing: The idea of gravitational lensing came into light after the General Theory of Relativity which describes the effect of gravity on the space time continuum. According to the theory, space time curvature sets the path of motion for the every object even for Light. However, if a gravitational field is so high that it can bend light, the phenomenon is called gravitational lensing. Here, in the image, you may observe a galaxy(a very massive object) in the foreground seemingly bends the light coming from a distant galaxy in background, but you may argue that it is not the light which bends but it is the space.
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Eddie J's profile photoAndré R (rixas)'s profile photoJordan Nicolas's profile photoAlan Ehling's profile photo
2 comments
Eddie J
 
Maybe space is another quantum field that interacts with gravity particles?!
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Jeff Evans

Space Exploration  - 
 
Some interesting ideas here
In a mere 60 years, we of Earth have gone from launching our first spacecraft, to exploring every planet and major moon in our solar…
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Amande Bee's profile photoViconas Tarmbac's profile photoRachelle Mcphail's profile photoRaya Raiq's profile photo
15 comments
 
uncertainty
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Jean Bernstein

Space Exploration  - 
 
Sin duda, desconocemos si Kardashev pensó en estas posibilidades que pudieran desarrollarse en una civilización avanzada del tipo III sin embargo son muy posibles considerando que errare humanum est  no sería sorprendente que pudiera pasar cualquiera de los siguientes escenarios.
http://mx.globedia.com/maneras-arruinar-sistema-solar
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I started a joke which started the whole world crying//But I didn t see that the joke was on me oh no// (...)//I looked at the skies running my hands over my eyes // Till I finally died which started the whole world living- Bee Gees (I Started A Joke)
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Mike Raven

Space Exploration  - 
 
With heavy heart, we learn that Apollo 14 Astronaut Edgar Mitchell has passed away.
http://ravenskullherald.com/wire-013-feb-16.php
Edgar Mitchell, Apollo 14 Lunar Module Pilot has passed away at 85 years old
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David Lee's profile photoMark Black's profile photoJon Belanger's profile photo
 
He believed that nasa has contacted aliens. Like to read his memoirs 
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Mike Raven

Space Exploration  - 
 
Milestone reached for the construction of the James Webb Space Telescope.
http://ravenskullherald.com/wire-012-feb-16.php
MILESTONE REACHED FOR THE JAMES WEBB TELESCOPE. Inside a massive clean room at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland the James Webb Space Telescope team used a robotic am to install the last of the telescope's 18 mirrors onto the telescope structure.
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Vignesh Karthick

Space Exploration  - 
 
 
Appearances can be deceiving - Saturn’s rings continue to surprise scientists
It seems intuitive that an opaque material should contain more stuff than a more translucent substance. For example, muddier water has more suspended particles of dirt in it than clearer water. Likewise, you might think that, in the rings of Saturn, more opaque areas contain a greater concentration of material than places where the rings seem more transparent.

But this intuition does not always apply, according to a recent study of the rings using data from NASA's Cassini mission. In their analysis, scientists found surprisingly little correlation between how dense a ring might appear to be -- in terms of its opacity and reflectiveness -- and the amount of material it contains.

The new results concern Saturn's B ring, the brightest and most opaque of Saturn's rings, and are consistent with previous studies that found similar results for Saturn's other main rings.

The scientists found that, while the opacity of the B ring varied by a large amount across its width, the mass – or amount of material – did not vary much from place to place. They "weighed" the nearly opaque center of the B ring for the first time -- technically, they determined its mass density in several places -- by analyzing spiral density waves. These are fine-scale ring features created by gravity tugging on ring particles from Saturn's moons, and the planet's own gravity. The structure of each wave depends directly on the amount of mass in the part of the rings where the wave is located.

Research on the mass of Saturn's rings has important implications for their age. A less massive ring would evolve faster than a ring containing more material, becoming darkened by dust from meteorites and other cosmic sources more quickly. Thus, the less massive the B ring is, the younger it might be -- perhaps a few hundred million years instead of a few billion.

Source & further reading:
http://www.nasa.gov/feature/jpl/saturns-rings-less-than-meets-the-eye

Photo: Saturn's B ring is the most opaque of the main rings, appearing almost black in this Cassini image taken from the unlit side of the ringplane.
Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

#space   #cassini   #saturn   #nasa  
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