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NGC 7023 ~ Iris Nebula
Distance to Earth: 1,300 light years
Constellation: Cepheus
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View of Earth from the Apollo 8 mission to the Moon 50 years ago
#apollo8 #earth
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Chaotic Clouds of Jupiter

This image captures swirling cloud belts and tumultuous vortices within Jupiter’s northern hemisphere.

NASA’s Juno spacecraft took this color-enhanced image at 10:23 p.m. PDT on May 23, 2018 (1:23 a.m. EDT on May 24), as the spacecraft performed its 13th close flyby of Jupiter. At the time, Juno was about 9,600 miles (15,500 kilometers) from the planet's cloud tops, above a northern latitude of 56 degrees.

The region seen here is somewhat chaotic and turbulent, given the various swirling cloud formations. In general, the darker cloud material is deeper in Jupiter’s atmosphere, while bright cloud material is high. The bright clouds are most likely ammonia or ammonia and water, mixed with a sprinkling of unknown chemical ingredients.

A bright oval at bottom center stands out in the scene. This feature appears uniformly white in ground-based telescope observations. However, with JunoCam we can observe the fine-scale structure within this weather system, including additional structures within it. There is not significant motion apparent in the interior of this feature; like the Great Red Spot, its winds probably slows down greatly toward the center.

Citizen scientists Gerald Eichstädt and Seán Doran created this image using data from the spacecraft’s JunoCam imager.

JunoCam's raw images are available for the public to peruse and process into image products at www.missionjuno.swri.edu/junocam      

More information about Juno is at:

https://www.nasa.gov/juno and http://missionjuno.swri.edu 

Image Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstädt /Seán Doran



Juno


http://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/jpl/chaotic-clouds-of-jupiter
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Messier 106 (NGC 4258)

This magnificent view of the spiral galaxy M106 was assembled from Hubble exposures and ground-based images taken by the amateur astronomer Robert Gendler. Gendler’s ground-based images were used to fill in pieces of the galaxy that Hubble did not observe. The center of the galaxy is composed almost entirely of Hubble observations. The outer spiral arms are also predominantly Hubble data, but were colorized with ground-based images taken by Gendler and fellow amateur astronomer Jay GaBany.

The image reveals one of the most striking features of M106: its extra pair of arms. Most spiral galaxies only have one pair of arms, but M106 has an extra set, seen here as red wisps of gas. Unlike the other arms, these two extra arms are made up of hot gas rather than stars. Astronomers attribute these ghostly arms to the supermassive black hole at the galaxy’s center. The extra arms appear to be an indirect result of the violent churning of matter around the black hole.

M106 was discovered by Charles Messier’s observing assistant, Pierre Méchain, in 1781. It is located 24 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Canes Venatici. Although a larger telescope is needed to resolve detail, M106 has a relatively bright apparent magnitude of 9.1 and can be spotted with a small telescope. It is best observed during May.

Image & Text Credit: NASA, ESA, the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) and R. Gendler (for the Hubble Heritage Team); Acknowledgment: J. GaBany.
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LOOK | THE MOST STUNNING VIEW OF THE MILKY WAY GALAXY
The photograph below shows the Milky way in the sky and Stonehenge monument.
Image credit : Kevin Ferrioli
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NGC 3718 AKA Arp 214 ~ galaxy.
Distance to Earth: 52 million light years.
Constellation: Ursa Major.
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Pillars of the Eagle Nebula | Hubble
Newborn stars are forming in the Eagle Nebula. Gravitationally contracting in pillars of dense gas and dust, the intense radiation of these newly-formed bright stars is causing surrounding material to boil away. This image, taken with the Hubble Space Telescope in near infrared light, allows the viewer to see through much of the thick dust that makes the pillars opaque in visible light. The giant structures are light years in length and dubbed informally the Pillars of Creation. Associated with the open star cluster M16, the Eagle Nebula lies about 6,500 light years away. The Eagle Nebula is an easy target for small telescopes in a nebula-rich part of the sky toward the split constellation Serpens Cauda (the tail of the snake).

Image Credit: NASA, ESA, Hubble, HLA
Processing: Lluís Romero
Release Date: June 20, 2018

+Hubble Space Telescope
+European Space Agency, ESA
+NASA Goddard
+Space Telescope Science Institute

#NASA #Hubble #Astronomy #Space #Nebula #Eagle #SerpensCauda #Infrared #Telescope #Cosmos #Universe #ESA #GSFC #Goddard #STScI #STEM #Education #APoD
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Sunspots of the day. 20-6-2018 Sony Dcr sr 68 , 200 frames staking in Registax . best greting /saludos a todos . more info here https://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/sunspots/
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