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SpaceAim.com

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The Hubble Space Telescope has captured vivid Auroras in Jupiter’s atmosphere.
The Hubble Space Telescope has captured vivid Auroras in Jupiter's atmosphere.
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Gerard Mackey's profile photo
 
cool
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Xārm Nạksū̂

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United Launch Alliance (ULA) has devised a plan that could enable a robust space economy based on the refueling of spacecraft away from Earth.
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Kevin C

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#Technology image of the week: ESA's Asteroid Impact Mission next to its target, to mark Thursday's #AsteroidDay.

Read more about our Asteroid Day activities:
http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2016/06/AIM_at_Didymos
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Moez &

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Amazing Moon
Saturn's Hyperion: A Moon with Odd Craters

Credit: Cassini Imaging Team, SSI, JPL, ESA,NASA

What lies at the bottom ofHyperion's strange craters? Nobody knows. To help find out, the robot Cassini spacecraft now orbiting Saturn swooped past the sponge-textured moon again last week ( 2005 October 3 ) and took an image of unprecedented detail. That image, shown above in false color, shows a remarkable world strewn with strange craters and a generally odd surface. The slight differences in color likely show differences in surface composition. At the bottom of most craters lies some type of unknown dark material. Inspection of the image shows bright features indicating that the dark material might be only tens of meters thick in some places. Hyperion is about 250 kilometers across, rotates chaotically, and has a density so low that it might house a vast system of caverns inside.


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Xārm Nạksū̂

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Laboratory experiments suggest that a layer of "dark hydrogen" lies between the atmospheres and cores of Jupiter and other gas giants.
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Matthew O'Farrell's profile photoLuke Rustin's profile photo
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+Matthew O'Farrell Scientists aren't sure. We have not observed any layer of Jupiter except the the very outermost. All of the layers below what we have observed are just very educated guesses based on the density of Jupiter, what we believe Jupiter's composition is, ect.
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James Webb Space Telescope

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Sagittarius Sunflowers 

These three bright nebulae are often featured in telescopic tours of the constellation Sagittarius and the crowded starfields of the central Milky Way. In fact, 18th century cosmic tourist Charles Messiercataloged two of them; M8, the large nebula left of center, and colorful M20 near the bottom of the frame The third, NGC 6559, is right of M8, separated from the larger nebula by dark dust lanes. All three are stellar nurseries about five thousand light-years or so distant. The expansive M8, over a hundred light-years across, is also known as the Lagoon Nebula. M20's popular moniker is the Trifid. In the composite image, narrowband data records ionized hydrogen, oxygen, and sulfur atoms radiating at visible wavelengths. The mapping of colors and range of brightness used to compose this cosmic still life were inspired by Van Gogh's famous Sunflowers. Just right of the Trifid one of Messier's open star clusters, M21, is also included on the telescopic canvas.


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Suds P's profile photo
Suds P
 
Wow.
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Moez &

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M1: The Crab Nebula from NOT

This is the mess that is left when a star explodes. The Crab Nebula, the result of a supernova seen in 1054 AD, is filled with mysterious filaments. Thefilaments are not only tremendously complex, but appear to have less mass than expelled in the original supernova and ahigher speed than expected from a free explosion. The above image, taken by theNordic Optical Telescope (NOT), is in three colors chosen for scientific interest. TheCrab Nebula spans about 10 light-years. In the nebula's very center lies a pulsar: aneutron star as massive as the Sun but with only the size of a small town. The Crab Pulsar rotates about 30 times each second.


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Moez &

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Beautiful Nebula
Welcome to community
The Great Nebula in Orion

 Few astronomical sights excite the imagination like the nearby stellar nursery known as the Orion Nebula. The Nebula's glowing gas surrounds hot young stars at the edge of an immense interstellar molecular cloud only 1500 light-years away. The Great Nebula in Orion can be found with the unaided eye just below and to the left of the easily identifiable belt of three stars in the popular constellation Orion. The above image has been contrast balanced to bring out Orion's detail in spectacular fashion. Visible simultaneously are the bright stars of the Trapezium inOrion's heart, the sweeping lanes of dark dust that cross the center, the pervasive red glowing hydrogen gas, and the blue tinted dust that reflects the light of newborn stars. The whole Orion Nebula cloud complex, which includes the Horsehead Nebula, will slowly disperse over the next 100,000 years


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Mycll d.D's profile photoRichard “Rick” Vayda's profile photo
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Thank you! It's fantastic!
Find a negative force major rift for us. 
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Lee Petersen

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Aurora borealis in early March near Fairbanks, Alaska.
 
Starry Night - Aurora over the hills north of Chena Hot Springs Road. Taken From the Angel Rocks Trail near Chena Hot Springs, Alaska. March, 2016
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nisarg pandya's profile photoMel P's profile photo
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Mel P
 
Epic shot 👍
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Uditi Joshi

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Picture taken from Hubble of Black Eye Galaxy
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Shaiful Goni's profile photoSueli Pereira pereira's profile photo
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Muito lindo. 
 ·  Translate
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Aidin Ashoori

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Tiziana Gibellini

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A deep exposure of the Lagoon Nebula
Remus Chua from Singapore
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Daniel Dobbs

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via http://bit.ly/1dm23ZQ

Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have photographed a festive-looking nearby planetary nebula called NGC 5189. The intricate structure of this bright gaseous nebula resembles a glass-blown holiday ornament with a glowing ribbon entwined.

Planetary nebulae represent the final brief stage in the life of a medium-sized star like our Sun. While consuming the last of the fuel in its core, the dying star expels a large portion of its outer envelope. This material then becomes heated by the radiation from the stellar remnant and radiates, producing glowing clouds of gas that can show complex structures, as the ejection of mass from the star is uneven in both time and direction.

A spectacular example of this beautiful complexity is seen in the bluish lobes of NGC 5189. Most of the nebula is knotty and filamentary in its structure. As a result of the mass-loss process, the planetary nebula has been created with two nested structures, tilted with respect to each other, that expand away from the center in different directions.

This double bipolar or quadrupolar structure could be explained by the presence of a binary companion orbiting the central star and influencing the pattern of mass ejection during its nebula-producing death throes. The remnant of the central star, having lost much of its mass, now lives its final days as a white dwarf. However, there is no visual candidate for the possible companion.

The bright golden ring that twists and tilts through the image is made up of a large collection of radial filaments and cometary knots. These are usually formed by the combined action of photo-ionizing radiation and stellar winds.

This image was taken with Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3 on July 6, 2012, in filters tuned to the specific colors of fluorescing sulfur, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms. Broad filters in the visible and near-infrared were used to capture the star colors.

For additional information, please contact:

Ray Villard
Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Md.
410-338-4514
villard@stsci.edu

Object Name: NGC 5189

Image Type: Astronomical

Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)


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Arshia Kaul's profile photo
 
should be named The Dragon Nebula.. 
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Corey Geller

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Butterfly Nebula

The wings of the Butterfly Nebula are actually cauldrons of gas heated to more than 36,000 degrees Fahrenheit. The gas is tearing across space at more than 600,000 miles an hour - fast enough to travel from Earth to the Moon in 24 minutes. Like all nebulae, this fury was caused by the death of a star, and represents one of the main sources of carbon in the universe, which we - in the end - are all made of!

-image courtesy of NASA/Hubble
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Suds P's profile photo
Suds P
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"We are stardust, we are golden"
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Tiziana Gibellini

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The distorted spiral galaxy NGC 660 (Pisces)

Dietmar Hager and Immo Gerber from Linz, Austria
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Frederick Henry's profile photo
 
Interesting😌
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Daniel Dobbs

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via http://bit.ly/1dm23ZQ

This striking NASA Hubble Space Telescope image, which shows what looks like the profile of a celestial bird, belies the fact that close encounters between galaxies are a messy business.

This interacting galaxy duo is collectively called Arp 142. The pair contains the disturbed, star-forming spiral galaxy NGC 2936, along with its elliptical companion, NGC 2937 at lower left.

Once part of a flat, spiral disk, the orbits of the galaxy's stars have become scrambled due to gravitational tidal interactions with the other galaxy. This warps the galaxy's orderly spiral, and interstellar gas is strewn out into giant tails like stretched taffy.

Gas and dust drawn from the heart of NGC 2936 becomes compressed during the encounter, which in turn triggers star formation. These bluish knots are visible along the distorted arms that are closest to the companion elliptical. The reddish dust, once within the galaxy, has been thrown out of the galaxy's plane and into dark veins that are silhouetted against the bright starlight from what is left of the nucleus and disk.

The companion elliptical, NGC 2937, is a puffball of stars with little gas or dust present. The stars contained within the galaxy are mostly old, as evidenced by their reddish color. There are no blue stars that would be evidence of recent star formation. While the orbits of this elliptical's stars may be altered by the encounter, it's not apparent that the gravitational pull by its neighboring galaxy is having much of an effect.

Above the pair, an unrelated, lone, bluish galaxy, inconsistently cataloged as UGC 5130, appears to be an elongated irregular or an edge-on spiral. Located 230 million light-years away, this galaxy is much closer to us than the colliding pair, and therefore is not interacting with them. It happens to lie along the same line of sight to foreground Milky Way stars caught in the image.

Arp 142 lies 326 million light-years away in the southern constellation Hydra. It is a member of the Arp catalog of peculiar galaxies observed by astronomer Halton C. Arp in the 1960s.

This color image is a composite of Wide Field Camera 3 photos taken in blue-green, yellow-red, and near-infrared light.

For additional information, contact:

Ray Villard
Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Md.
410-338-4514
villard@stsci.edu

Zolt Levay
Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Md.
410-338-4907
levay@stsci.edu

Object Names: Arp 142, NGC 2396/2397

Image Type: Astronomical

Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)


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Abhinav Pandey's profile photo
 
Wow that's awesome and great 
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Xārm Nạksū̂

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Image of the galactic center. For the interferometric GRAVITY observations the star IRS 16C was used as a reference star, the actual target was the star S2. The position of the center, which harbors the black hole known as Sgr A*, with 4 million solar masses, is marked by the orange cross.
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Daniel Dobbs

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via http://bit.ly/1dm23ZQ

Several million young stars are vying for attention in this NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of a raucous stellar breeding ground in 30 Doradus, located in the heart of the Tarantula Nebula. Early astronomers nicknamed the nebula because its glowing filaments resemble spider legs.

30 Doradus is the brightest star-forming region visible in a neighboring galaxy and home to the most massive stars ever seen. The nebula resides 170,000 light-years away in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a small, satellite galaxy of our Milky Way. No known star-forming region in our galaxy is as large or as prolific as 30 Doradus.

The composite image comprises one of the largest mosaics ever assembled from Hubble photos and includes observations taken by Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3 and Advanced Camera for Surveys. The Hubble image is combined with ground-based data of the Tarantula Nebula, taken with the European Southern Observatory's 2.2-meter telescope in La Silla, Chile. NASA and the Space Telescope Science Institute are releasing the image to celebrate Hubble's 22nd anniversary.

Collectively, the stars in this image are millions of times more massive than our Sun. The image is roughly 650 light-years across and contains some rambunctious stars, from one of the fastest rotating stars to the speediest and most massive runaway star.

The nebula is close enough to Earth that Hubble can resolve individual stars, giving astronomers important information about the stars' birth and evolution. Many small galaxies have more spectacular starbursts, but the Large Magellanic Cloud's 30 Doradus is one of the only extragalactic star-forming regions that astronomers can study in so much detail. The star-birthing frenzy in 30 Doradus may be partly fueled by its close proximity to its companion galaxy, the Small Magellanic Cloud.

The image reveals the stages of star birth, from embryonic stars a few thousand years old still wrapped in cocoons of dark gas to behemoths that die young in supernova explosions. 30 Doradus is a star-forming factory, churning out stars at a furious pace over millions of years. Hubble shows star clusters of various ages, from about 2 million to about 25 million years old.

The region's sparkling centerpiece is a giant, young star cluster (left of center) named NGC 2070, only 2 million years old. Its stellar inhabitants number roughly 500,000. The cluster is a hotbed for young, massive stars. Its dense core, known as R136, is packed with some of the heftiest stars found in the nearby universe, weighing more than 100 times the mass of our Sun.

The massive stars are carving deep cavities in the surrounding material by unleashing a torrent of ultraviolet light, which is etching away the enveloping hydrogen gas cloud in which the stars were born. The image reveals a fantasy landscape of pillars, ridges, and valleys. Besides sculpting the gaseous terrain, the brilliant stars also may be triggering a successive generation of offspring. When the radiation hits dense walls of gas, it creates shocks, which may be generating a new wave of star birth.

The colors represent the hot gas that dominates regions of the image. Red signifies hydrogen gas and blue, oxygen.

Hubble imaged 30 separate fields, 15 with each camera. Both cameras were making observations at the same time. Hubble made the observations in October 2011.

For more information, contact:

Ray Villard
Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Md.
410-338-4514
villard@stsci.edu

 

Object Names: Tarantula Nebula, 30 Doradus, 30 Dor, NGC 2070

Image Type: Astronomical

Credit: NASA, ESA, D. Lennon and E. Sabbi (ESA/STScI), J. Anderson, S. E. de Mink, R. van der Marel, T. Sohn, and N. Walborn (STScI), N. Bastian (Excellence Cluster, Munich), L. Bedin (INAF, Padua), E. Bressert (ESO), P. Crowther (University of Sheffield), A. de Koter (University of Amsterdam), C. Evans (UKATC/STFC, Edinburgh), A. Herrero (IAC, Tenerife), N. Langer (AifA, Bonn), I. Platais (JHU), and H. Sana (University of Amsterdam)


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Daniel Dobbs's profile photoRajendrakumar Himatlal Pandya's profile photo
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Xārm Nạksū̂

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The Juno mission to Jupiter is the subject of a new, short documentary, "Destination: Jupiter."
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Enigma's profile photo
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Enigma
 
+starview1 It's all a coverup made by NASA. They don't need to do it. NASA biggest fear is the UFO subject. Here, I'll show you what NASA has been filmed for decades (courtesy of my channel, if you like mysterious subjects than follow me here on Google):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G2XfzV8_f_M
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