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Zions Kirke

At the time of its construction, this was the largest mand-made structure in Greenland. Now, it just seems like an average arctic-sized chruch, close to the coastline. Being a small town of less than 5,000, it's pretty easy to find the church as the whole town is technically walkable.

I say technically because, well, being if you're not used to cold weather you might not appreciate walking around in freezing temperatures for 20-30 minutes at a time. It's surprisingly doable though if you prepare proper clothing, and, the cold doesn't feel as cold when you're in the arctic compared to non-polar latitudes.

Blogged: http://www.aisleseatplease.com/blog/2016/10/19/zions-kirke

#ZionsKirke #ZionsChurch #church #zions #ilulisat #greenland #arctic #polar #christianity #travel #photography #explore #structure #travelphotography #그린란드
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Flying Over The Ilulissat Icefjord

As the name of my travel photoblog suggests, I do typically prefer the aisle seat in airplanes. But there are exceptions to every rule. Is the flight under 2 hours and am I super super sleepy? Or is there something incredibly cool I want to see out the window? Well, a window seat might just be in the cards then! I'd have to say flying over a ginormous UNESCO World Heritage Site such as the Ilulissat Icefjord definitely qualifies for window seat photos.

Seeing icebergs, be it from the air, land or sea, is truly a...moving experience. You can look out the window of your hotel room, see some icebergs, and then the next day, those same icebergs will have moved further through the fjord. It's always hard to judge the size of these things without something to put them in perspective, but, let's just say they tend to be much larger than you would expect at times.

Blogged: http://www.aisleseatplease.com/blog/2016/9/14/flying-over-the-ilulissat-icefjord

#IlulissatIcefjord #Ilulissat #Icefjord #UNESCOWorldHeritageSite #Landscape #BlackAndWhite #DiskoBay #Greenland #monochrome #artic #polar #travel #photography #iceberg #unesco #blackandwhitephotography #landscapephotography #travelphotography #그린란드
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From The Waters Of Ilulissat

The tiny town of Ilulissat, with a population of 4,500 is probably larger than you would expect given its location 350km (220mi) north of the Arctic Circle. This makes it the third largest city in all of Greenland. It's amazing the conditions people will endure and survive in at times. So extreme yet, there is some normality of life here, just like everywhere else.

The Zion Church (Zions Kirke) on the left was built in the late 18th century. At the time, it was the largest man-made structure in all of Greenland. For such an otherwise desolate place, the buildings are brightly colored. Perhaps to aid in keeping spirits up, or just so they stand out from the white snow.

With the neighboring Ilulissat Icefjord, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, the town is the most popular tourist destination in Greenland. It's not a bad place to spend a few days, and even though it can be bitterly cold, the town is quite walkable.

Blogged: http://www.aisleseatplease.com/blog/2016/6/20/from-the-waters-of-ilulissat

#ilulissat #greenland #cityscape #landscape #travel #photography #canon #zionchurch #church #outdoors #adventure #explore #travelphotography #그린난드
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Ice Collision

One of several, nearly unbelievable examples of what happens when two streams of ice push up against each other. You get these incredible formations of ice that change near-daily as the ice slowly pushes on. If you stop and listen for a moment, you can even hear the eerie sound of of ice on ice forces.

Greenland isn't one of those countries with a whole lot to do during the day when it's winter, but it does have some beautiful ice covered snowscapes to take in. What you see when you go to sleep can be quite different from what you see when you wake up. It's truly amazing how quickly the landscape can change at times.

Blogged: http://www.aisleseatplease.com/blog/2016/3/28/ice-collision

#greenland #qeqqata   #HDR   #landscape   #ice   #winter   #snow   #polar   #arctic   #nature   #travel   #photography   #canon   #teamcanon   #travelphotography   #landscapephotography   #그린란드  
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The Tiny Town Of Ilulissat

At approximately 220mi (350km) north of the Arctic Circle, Ilulissat is, pretty far north! Which makes it all the more amazing that there are over 4,500 people that actually call this town home. I was impressed there was even 4G service there too.

Walking about the town in the middle of winter, you can really feel you're trapped in a small enclave of society. I remember walking outside of my hotel and seeing a few kids just bouncing a big ball against the wall and catching it. I guess options for entertainment are limited when you're a kid in Greenland.

The roads don't really go anywhere outside of town. While that makes sense considering the harsh climate and vast distances to neighboring villages, it still feels a bit like a luxury to even own a car in that context. Living in such a remote corner of the world, in such an unforgiving environment, it must take emotional fortitude to survive.
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Kællingekløften

Kællingekløften, or the Witches Gorge as its known has a somewhat dark story behind it. Around 900 years ago, in times when food supplies were scarce, old women would commit suicide here by jumping into the gorge. One less mouth to feed meant more food to prevent the young from going hungry.

The actual gorge is the indent in the lower center, which, from this angle is probably not the best to see it as it's obscured, but trust me, it's there! The gorge is 35m (115') deep. Best to watch your step on the rocks and snow, unless you want to unwittingly contribute to reducing global hunger.
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In The Face Of Snow

The Greenland sledge dog is a work animal, able to traverse difficult terrain with ease at a quick pace. Greenland being the least densely populated country in the world, transport by dog sledge is far more practical than by snowmobile over long distances. It's not really convenient to bring tons of extra fuel (or dog food) along, so on longer expeditions the expectation is to hunt along the way in order to feed the dogs.

My expedition was relatively short at just two full days. I traveled with a local Greenlander and his pack of 13 sledge dogs. Accompanying us were two more local drivers leading two Italian tourists. When we came upon a fishing site sans fisherman, we found a number of scrap skate fish and parts left behind. The drivers went through some of the scraps, carving off the meaty parts to later feed the dogs with.

Greenland dogs have been used in some famous polar expeditions, as they were prized for being the best sled dogs, and more reliable than other means of transportation in the harsh climate. Famed Norwegian explorer, Roald Amundsen chose 97 Greenland dogs to accompany him and his team on his expedition to the South Pole. That many dogs weren't really needed, but the intent was to feed the weaker dogs to the stronger ones during the voyage. 

Amundsen's expedition became the first to reach the South Pole on December 14th, 1911. He beat Robert Falcon Scott's Terra Nova Expedition by five weeks. The race to the South Pole is an intriguing story that captivates the spirit of exploration as well as its dangers (Scott would die on his return journey).
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Spreading Out The Clouds

While I had seen various photos and videos of Greenland prior to arriving, I still wasn't quite sure what to expect when going on a dog sled expedition for a couple days. It's pretty amazing how much a landscape predominantly made up of snow and ice can change.

Every now and then I would come across these ice structures that would break up the flat, frozen ice highway. When you're sitting for an hour at a time, with the foul stench of dog farts flying at your face, it's nice to have some pretty scenery to look at.
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Behind Kangerlussuaq Airport

I took a long walk from one side of Kangerlussuaq to the other. Basically, this means I walked around the airport as there are sort of two parts of town on either side of the runway. This road runs "behind" the airport if you will, as it's on the opposite side as the terminal.

In general, getting on/off flights is a pretty casual affair, with only international flights seeming to resemble a normal boarding process. Flying domestic? No need for going through security - just hand your ticket to the gate agent and walk out onto the tarmac and up the steps to the plane. Easy peasy!
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Reflections Of An Iceberg

As I sit down and write about this iceberg, I'm immediately transported back to the awe and wonder I felt on the day of my iceberg cruise. What a concept! A mighty iceberg sunk the Titanic so many years ago, and now we flirt with danger by cruising between these 'bergs.

Well, it's not really scary at all, but it is still amazing to see icebergs of all shapes and sizes. Some are so massive you would think some apartment buildings fell over, managed to float, and were covered in snow and ice. It's truly just an incredible thing to see. Growing up in the Midwest, I never saw anything remotely resembling mother nature's arctic handiwork.
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