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Selwyn Quan

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Blewit (Clitocybe nuda)

This series on mushrooms of Cuesta park in Mountain View, California continues...

According to the Mykoweb site, the Blewit (Clitocybe nuda) is the Bay Area's most common choice edible mushroom since it is abundant in many of the public parks. It has a saprobic lifestyle meaning that it feeds on dead or decaying organic matter and wood mulch is a good food source.

Young specimens have a distinctive lilac colored cap which fade to brown as they age.
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Christa Engels's profile photoMARY L. MARTIN's profile photo
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Now this is the kinda shit that makes me hmmmm. U know wata mean.... At the same time makes me miss home more....
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Selwyn Quan

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Pine Spike (Chroogomphus vinicolor)

My survey of different mushroom species found at Cuesta park in Mountain View, my local neighborhood park, continues with this photograph taken after our recent rains.

Pine spikes belongs to the small but interesting genus Chroomogomphus which are more closely related to the boletes than the gilled mushrooms but have developed gills independently according to genetic data.

Chroogomphus are generally associated with pines and Chroogomphus vinicolor with Monterey pine (Pinus radiata) in particular in the Bay Area.

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שילת מרציאנו's profile photoAtima Jeffery's profile photo
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Is it edible plants
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Selwyn Quan

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Psathyrella longipes

You could probably guess that this solitary but attractive mushroom photographed at Rancho San Antonio preserve near Cupertino belonged to the ink cap family of mushrooms - and you would not be too far off.

It belongs to the Psathyrellaceae family of mushrooms of which the classical ink caps (Coprinus sp.) are related. Psathyrella however differs in that its fruiting body does not undergo autodigestion once spores mature like the typical ink caps.
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deirdre Devlin's profile photo
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Love it..think mushrooms are cool..allergic to most of them;( except crimini:)
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Selwyn Quan

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Turkey Tail (Trametes versicolor)

Mushrooms are now quite abundant in the Bay Area with all the rain.

The Turkey tail (Trametes versicolor) is one of the most common and easily recognizable polypore mushrooms found in the Bay area so called because its appearance is like the feathers of a turkey tail.

It is commonly found on dead hardwood logs or stumps often in association with other similar looking fungi. Turkey tails can however be distinguished by looking underneath the fruiting body. Turkey tails have small pores whereas the False Turkey tail (Stereum ostreata) has a smooth surface. The Gilled polypore (Lenzites betulina) has true gills.

The polypores generally and Turkey tail in particular have long been used medicinally in China and Japan. Intriguingly, the FDA also approved the use of polysaccharide-K (krestin, PSK) as an adjuvant in cancer chemotherapy.
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Carrie Campbell (Carebear)'s profile photo
 
Absolutely amazing capture!
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Selwyn Quan

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Most plus-one post of 2016

A belated happy new year to all!

The past year has been my first full year with my Google Plus collection on Bay Area nature photography. While relatively new to both the Bay Area and macro photography, Google Plus has provided me with a great resource to share as I explore the Bay Area and learn the craft of macro photography.

I am grateful to all those following this journey and with whom I have had the chance to interact with on Google+. Hopefully the journey continues in 2017...

 
Acmon Blue (Plebejus acmon)

Was at Rancho San Antonio park near Cupertino recently in search of male tarantulas (Aphonopelma sp.), out and about at this time of year in search of females. With the tarantulas come the gigantic tarantula hawks, wasps that specialize on tarantulas as Found a tarantula hawk wasp but was nowhere close enough to photograph it. Instead came across a surprising number of butterflies for the tail end of the butterfly season including this Acmon Blue (Plebejus acmon). I always come across them at the same spot at Rancho probably because of the presence of Birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus), their larval host plant, growing in the area.
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bilquesmehboob shah's profile photoΚατερίνα Κορκοτσελου's profile photo
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Τι ομορφη!!!!
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Selwyn Quan

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Candy Cap (Lactarius sp.)

This is a continuation of the series on mushrooms identified at my Cuesta park, Mountain View, California.

This Lactarius mushroom from my discussion on the website iNaturalist may either be the Candy cap ( L. rubidus) or the rufous candy cap (L. rufulus). The Candy Caps are prized edible mushrooms well known for the highly aromatic maple syrup or butterscotch smell they develop when dried.

There is an interesting back story on how researchers were able to discover that the smell. The question was already asked back in 1985 but only with improvements in gas chromatography were the researchers able to isolate and identify the volatile compound. They identified quabalactone III which is converted to sotolon upon contact with water [1]. Sotolon is present in fenugreek and lovage and also used as the flavoring compound in artificial maple syrup.

Meanwhile, I am drying my Candy caps to see if the maple syrup smell develops!

[1] Wood et al. (2012) The maple syrup odour of the “candy cap” mushroom, Lactarius fragilis var. rubidus. Biosystematics and Ecology 43: 51-53.
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MIRZA MUHAMMAD JAHANGIR's profile photobaby Corn's profile photo
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Ahan 
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Selwyn Quan

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Slippery Jack (Suillus pungens)

This is a continuation of my series on mushrooms found at Cuesta park, my local neighborhood park in Mountain View, California.

The Slippery Jack (Suillus pungens) was photographed with the Pine Spike (Chroogomphus vinicolor) described in my previous post. Recent research suggests that many of the mushrooms like the Pine Spike belonging to the Gomphidiaceae family have an intimate parasitic relationship with ectomycorrhizal boletes such as Suillus.

Boletes are recognized by their pored instead of gilled fruiting bodies. Suillus are a genus within the boletes that characteristically have slimy caps hence the name Slippery Jack.

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Sharon Block's profile photo
 
With all the rain in the Bay area this year you are bound to find many of natures deights.Enjoy the adventure: ) TY for your continued posts! 
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Selwyn Quan

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Redlead Roundhead (Leratiomyces ceres)

It is a now a great time to go looking for mushrooms in the Bay Area. With a series of winter storms behind us and another predicted for next week, perfect weather for mushrooms!

A short walk around Cuesta park, my local neighborhood park, I was able to spot at least 10 different species, most too difficult for a novice like me to identify. This Redlead roundhead (Leratiomyces ceres) is quite distinctive and noticeable.

According to www.mushroomexpert.com one of the better mushroom identification websites I have come across on the internet, it is found on lawns or woodchips and likely a landscaping import also found in Europe and Australia.
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Arisha Halwa's profile photo
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kereeeeenn, COOL
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Selwyn Quan

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Scarlet Waxy Cap (Hygrocybe coccinea)

This small but striking Scarlet waxy cap (Hygrocybe coccinea) was photographed at Rancho San Antonio park near Cupertino.

Hygrocybe as its name "water head" implies have a waxy to slimy cap, white spores and a smooth ringless stem.

Recent research seems to suggest that they are not mycorrhizzal or saprotrophic like many other fungi but may form a symbiotic association with mosses.
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Narendrasinh Narendrasinh's profile photoWillie Tamb's profile photo
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Never seen like it before@@#
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Yellow Fieldcap (Bolbitius titubans)

So much for La Niña but thankful for the abundance of rain in the Bay Area the last few days.

Managed to get out to Rancho San Antonio in Cupertino in between rain spells. Weather was a tad frigid today with a rare sighting of frost on this yellow fieldcap (Bolbitius titubans).

This is common and widespread inedible mushroom found in America and Europe on dung or fertilized soil.
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Νίκη Κουζελη's profile photoch afzal chaudhary's profile photo
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Nice
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