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It's hard to capture how wonderful the Palau de la Musica Catalana just is, with a camera or even 360-camera. The light, the intricate filigree work of the columns, the statuary; it's all overwhelming.
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We arrived in Barcelona on Saturday early evening and we kept close to the hotel and made it a short night, but we explored the city on Sunday.
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The Cathédrale Saint-Sauveur in Aix-en-Provence is just wonderful. As is the whole city. Outside of Marseilles, it's the largest city in the area and has so much character and charm we would recommend it to all who travel to the area. It has some tourist sites, like the cathedral, but overall its big attraction is its relaxed personality, shopping and dining.
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We drove up to Gordes today to check out the fabled lavender fields of the region. L'Eglise Saint Firmin, Gordes, Provence, June 27, 2016
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There was a flea market in town today, Sunday. Despite my best efforts, Bob said, "non," we would not be bringing this kid home.
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The garden at the house is just beautiful. We have no idea what these flowers are called, but they are lovely.
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So, our relaxing stay in Provence was interrupted by the UK's vote to leave the European Union. I have been posting to Facebook interesting stories and comments and my own opinions, but I will go a little deeper here.

As an EU national who remembers when it was called the EEC, I'm disappointed in the vote. It was close, 51.9% to 48.1%, but the breakdown of the voting demographics speaks volumes: A majority who voted to "Leave" did not have a college education, many did not have passports and rarely travelled abroad, a majority were white, and over 55.

Sound familiar? This is what happens when the Fox News audience votes. Stupid things happen.

The European Union is a flawed, but incredibly valuable proposition. Yet the whole idea of stamping one's foot, turning on one's heel and storming out of the room—which is pretty much what the "Leave" voters did—is not how to solve the EU's problems.

The sheer cowardice and rancor of Britain's isolationists, led by what appears to be the UK's farcical Trump wannabe, Boris Johnson, says more about the Conservative movement— in the UK, and in France and in the US—and its opposition to change: Social and political evolution (and in the knuckle-dragging Bible Belt of the US, the actual science of evolution).

But let's be honest: The UK never truly engaged in the EU. (They never adopted the Euro.) Still high on the fading vapors of its long dead empire, they begrudgingly joined the EU, happy to send their oiks to football matches on the continent and to retire to the beaches of the Algarve, or to enjoy cheap hen parties in Dublin or Barcelona or Ibiza.

Unlike the French, the Brits never understood—or could swallow—the fact that their empire is dead. It died at the Suez Canal in 1956, when the new kids on the block (the US) let France and the UK empty their last salvoes of imperial impotence across the Middle East.

This is what happens when bitter old people, longing for a past that most likely didn't exist—but helped perpetuate codified sexism, racism and homophobia—are allowed to act out. Or worse, are fed nonsense by manipulators who only wish to gin up the worst fears and anxieties of the electorate for short-term gain.

Now, Johnson and his ilk have thrown up literal roadblocks to opportunities for almost 40 percent of the British population. The United States didn't become a global powerhouse just because Eisenhower ushered in the greatest infrastructure public project of the 20th century; it was the resulting mobility created by that project which afforded people the ability to relocate and pursue opportunities across the US.

Like the Tea Party in the US, the Ukip, are afraid of the future, because it's a future where white, English-speaking males are not top dogs. And that bugs the shit out of them.

Welcome to Earth, crack open a history book and stay awhile.
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When we picked my brother Alan up from the train station in Avignon.
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It's the weekly farmers market and we stumbled upon a stand selling prune preserves and juice. It's both a condiment AND a laxative!
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Eygalières is a small town of about 1000 people located in Provence in Alpilles National Park. It's beautiful, with sandstone and stucco buildings dating back to the 1700s.
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