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First eggnog of the season!
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3 1/2 oz. bourbon
4 dashes Peychaud's bitters
1 1/2 oz. Amaro
1/2 oz. Strega

Combine in a flask.

Note: This recipe makes enough for a standard 6 oz. flask. If using a larger flask, adjust ratios accordingly.
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Chicago boasts one of the nation's most corrupt police forces: Chicago PD ran an off-the-books secret torture site; stole millions from innocents and used the funds to buy illegal surveillance gear; has more than 125,000 outstanding abuse complaints; conducted an illegal extortion racket and a coverup that went to the highest levels; is systemically racist and corrupt; a force that tolerates cops who cover up and celebrate murder (no surprise that the force trained the ex-Gitmo torturer who beat Dr David Dao unconscious for refusing to give up his seat on a United flight).

Such a system does not spring up of its own accord: it requires that corruption be shot through at every level and in every process. One egregious example of this corruption is the secret appeals process by which police officers who are convicted of wrongdoing can have those convictions silently overturned, their records expunged, and their punishments waived.
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It’s an unusual blend, combining their signature Kentucky rye with Canadian rye from Alberta Distillers and California port wine. A deeply fruity aroma of dark berries matches its slight ruby hue, but the spiciness of the rye dominates on first sip. Flavors of caramel and dried fruits round out the finish, and at 80 proof, it’s smooth and easy-drinking.
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½ oz. rye whiskey
¼ oz. Cherry Heering
1 tsp. yellow Chartreuse
1 dash Angostura bitters
2 dashes Bittermens Mole bitters
2 oz. chilled sparkling wine
Tools: barspoon, strainer
Glass: coupe
Garnish: lemon peel

Add all the ingredients, except the wine, to a mixing glass and stir with ice until chilled. Pour the sparkling wine into a chilled coupe, then strain the cocktail into the glass and stir gently with a spoon. Garnish.
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William Elliott of Brooklyn's Sauvage serves his version of the Stinger in a slightly oversized coupe, poured over a cube of angular, hand-cut “diamond” ice.

That seems a bit much, even for me.
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On the whole this is more expressive than your typical bottle of Jameson, differing in quite a few ways. Let’s start with the nose: Here we find a lot going on. Oily wood, a mix of fresh fruits, some floral hints, and a heavily-toasted grain note running through all of it. It’s engaging but surprising — a bolder approach to Irish than most will be used to.

The palate is effusive with fruit, right from the start. Bursting with citrus (lots of lime), banana, and bubble gum, it starts off sweet and builds on that with notes of orange and persimmon. As the palate develops, the whiskey runs to honey, then red raspberry, before leading to a surprising chocolate note that seemingly comes out of nowhere. The finish has more of a bite than I’d expected, slightly vegetal at times but decidedly Irish.
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The higher the sugar content, the longer the shelf life. However, all syrups are prone to fermentation under certain conditions, so make sure you keep them in the fridge and use within few days (1:1 syrups) to a week (2:1 syrups). You can prolong shelf life by adding acid and/or alcohol; if the mix sits above 12 percent ABV, it should last at least a few months.
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1½ oz. rye whiskey (Tecosky uses Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Rye)
½ oz. fresh lemon juice
½ oz. of simple syrup (1:1)
2 dashes Peychaud’s bitters
Soda water
Tools: shaker, strainer
Glass: lowball
Garnish: lemon wheel

Combine to the first 4 ingredients with ice in a shaker and shake to chill. Strain into an ice-filled glass, top with soda water, then garnish.
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This is a surprisingly fully-formed rye, with a very racy nose full of baking spices, brown sugar, and flecks of bitter roots giving it a curious and pungent aroma. The palate brings all of the above to a mostly cohesive whole, eventually. At first blush, some toasty grain notes and barrel char give it a too-youthful presentation, but with a little air things settle down and the whiskey reveals a strong line of butterscotch at the core, ample vanilla, and plenty of that cinnamon/nutmeg-driven baking spice. The finish sees a reprise of that lightly bitter edge, which gives it some unexpected character. The whiskey doesn’t come together 100% completely, as the balance richochets a bit between sweet and bitter without ever finding an equilibrium, but on the whole I find it quite engaging and definitely worth a look, particularly as a cocktail mixer.
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