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Mawa-wala: Every day in the sweetshops of Mumbai, there are little elves behind the scene who make mawa. What's mawa, you ask? It's condensed milk. Milk is poured into a big iron kadai (wok), heated and stirred and stirred and stirred, until it becomes this rich brown colour. It takes hours! Mawa is also called khoya. It is the base for many Indian desserts.
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Rakhi-wala
Only to be found during the festival of Raksha Bandhan... little stalls selling rakhis spring up all over the city!
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Limbu-wali. On Mondays the market at Matunga is closed. But there she was, ready to work extra! In Mumbai people are willing to go that extra mile to fulfil their dreams.
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Bhuttawala
Among Mumbai's many monsoon delights is white corn. It has small, dense, white kernels, which are satisfactorily grainy and chewy. It is leagues bettter than the sweet yellow variety that has flooded the market these days.
http://mumbai-magic.blogspot.in/2015/08/bazaar-treasures-monsoon-special-3.html
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Courier-wala
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Chaiwala - because the city runs on tea!
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Paan-beedi wala

All over the city, there are little corner shops which sell cigarettes and beedis (traditional smokes, tobacco rolled in leaves). Many also sell paan, an after-meal mouth freshener and digestive.
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Kangiwali
 - comb seller
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Palmist (hastrekhawala? jyotish?)
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Kandmoolwala - he sells slices of a forest tuber, which is said to be the one that Rama and Lakshmana ate during their years of exile in the forest.
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