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The museum at 108-Mile-House also has an outdoor section, where they proudly display this trapper cabin.
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"But Emily, why don't you want to go to school?"
"Because our teacher looks creepy."

Old schoolhouse in 108-Mile-House in British Columbia, Canada.
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We drove. A lot. This is somewhere between Clinton and Quesnel, Britsh Columbia. There isn't a lot of traffic, and the view doesn't change much either. But somehow the landscape pulled me in.
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I feel like I have seriously neglected photography in the past months. So I thought, what better way to distract myself from the current sad state of affairs and dive into my archive to continue to work on my series about our summer road trip through British Columbia. And the next picture - in chronological order - was this:

Clinton is a sleepy town in British Columbia, Canada. One of its highlights is a tractor, parked there probably for years. With cars for sale behind it, probably for years. Clinton is old and boring. Same as all small, old, boring towns. Nothing new, nothing exciting. When you live in a town like that, you feel like you're stuck. No future. No choice. But I felt all in all Clinton is pretty nice, though. I think if people would give Clinton a chance, they would come to love it.

I couldn't make it up if I tried.
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At 105 Mile House (yes, that's the name of the "town") we found a lovely museum, caringly maintained by two lovely ladies. An old farm house and grounds filled to the brim with items from the turn of the last 18th century.
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Along the country road we were making our way up north...
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Hole in the Wall
On our way to Lillooet (BC), we came down from the mountains and spotted a railway tunnel above the highway.
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What impressed me the most with Whistler was how much nature they brought into the village. So quaint and beautiful (but not as quaint as some of the ski village in Switzerland or Austria... this is a much more modern "quaint" - not sure if that even exists.)
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Of course, Whistler was the host of the 2010 Winter Olympics, and there are remnants of this event still everywhere. But even without the Olympic Rings, Whistler is worth a visit - even if it's only a short stop like the one we did to eat some kangaroo pie.
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Our first stop: Whistler.
What do you do, when you have a successful winter sport village that's quite empty in summer? You let people use the hill for mountain biking!

The ski lift gets transformed to bring riders up the hill, and then they ride down. All day long. Every day in summer. It's big business. I wouldn't do it if you paid me to, but if nature is already wrecked by the ski hill business, why not use it for more stuff?
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