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We were halfway to the mountains for our weekend camping trip before I realized we'd forgotten something so we pulled off at a Walmart. This beauty was on a clearance shelf right by the front door. Of course I bought her!!

#queenhippolyta #wonderwoman #toys #imanadult #idontcare

https://instagram.com/p/BXrPEZXg_3l/
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Way to go Kavya!

via +Mike Reeves-McMillan
Nice work. "When 16-year-old Kavya Kopparapu wasn’t attending conferences, giving speeches, presiding over her school’s bioinformatics society, organizing a research symposium, playing piano, and running a non-profit, she worried about what to do with all her free time.
[...]
Of 415 million diabetics worldwide, one-third will develop retinopathy. Fifty percent will be undiagnosed. Of patients with severe forms, half will go blind in five years. Most will be poor.

“The lack of diagnosis is the biggest challenge,” Kopparapu says. “In India, there are programs that send doctors into villages and slums, but there are a lot of patients and only so many ophthalmologists.” What if there were a cheap, easy way for local clinicians to find new cases and refer them to a hospital?

That was the genesis of Eyeagnosis, a smartphone app plus 3D-printed lens that seeks to change the diagnostic procedure from a 2-hour exam requiring a multi-thousand-dollar retinal imager to a quick photo snap with a phone.

Kopparapu and her team—including her 15-year-old brother, Neeyanth, and her high school classmate Justin Zhang—trained an artificial intelligence system to recognize signs of diabetic retinopathy in photos of eyes and offer a preliminary diagnosis. She presented the system at the O’Reilly Artificial Intelligence conference, in New York City, last month.

“The device is ideal for making screening much more efficient and available to a broader population,” says J. Fielding Hejtmancik, an expert in visual diseases at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Other research groups, including Google and Peek Vision, have recently announced similar systems, but Hejtmancik is impressed with the students’ ingenuity. “These kids have put things together in a very nice way that’s a bit cheaper and simpler than most [systems designed by researchers]—who, by the way, all have advanced degrees!”
[...]
Hejtmancik, the NIH expert, notes that there’s a long road to clinical adoption. “What she’s going to need is a lot of clinical data showing that [Eyeagnosis] is reliable under a variety of situations: in eye hospitals, in the countryside, in clinics out in the boonies of India,” he says.

Still, Hejtmancik thinks the system has real commercial potential. The only problem, he says, is that it’s so cheap that big companies might not see the potential for a profit margin. But that affordability “is exactly what you want in medical care, in my opinion,” he says."

+Harish Pillay +Jyoti Q Dahiya
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Hello princesses!

I just got this message and thought I'd check in with you all for recommendations:

Hi. Does anyone do Coding for a living or have young girls into coding? I am looking for a book and/or game for 8 year girl who is interested in coding. She has taken a class. I was looking at the book Girl Code: Gaming, Going Viral and Getting it Done but not sure if that's too advanced or too old for her. I appreciate some guidance.
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Today's the 24th birthday of kickass adventurer Jessica Watson.

Seven years (and three days) ago, on May 15, 2010, 16-year-old Jessica Watson became the youngest person to complete a solo trip around the world. It was the completion a dream she had when she was 12, inspired by a a book her mother had read to her and her siblings.

What kind of bravery is needed to head out onto the ocean alone at the age of 16, knowing if you're successful you'll be spending eight months completely alone? Whatever it is, it's clear Jessica Watson had plenty of it.

During her adventurous voyage, she was responsible for repairing damage to her boat, navigating around or through storms, and keeping herself motivated to continue. She blogged about her experiences: http://www.jessicawatson.com.au/_blog/Official_Jessica_Watson_Blog/

These days, she still sails quite a bit, when she can find time in her busy schedule. More often, though, she travels around the world by airplane, serving as a Youth Ambassador for The United Nations World Food Programme.

+ + +

She's written about her experience in her book True Spirit: http://amzn.to/2qxSi5k

You can read more about her historic voyage as well as what she's working on now: http://jessicawatson.com.au

You can read about her work with the UN's World Food Programme: http://www.wfp.org/jessica

You can read about other brave girls: https://selfrescuingprincesssociety.blogspot.com/search/label/young%20women

+ + +

If you like these posts, please consider supporting my Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/SRPS

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What a badass. Clearly she has her priorities sorted already.
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This is the coolest thing I've seen in a while, and the smart young women who invented it just rock my socks!
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"Thanks to Vilhunen’s care and respect, Hobbyhorse Revolution is something far more precious, rare, and unexpected than just a 90-minute feature on an intense sport that revolves around a children’s toy. It’s a film that actually takes teen girls and their interests, struggles, and triumphs seriously. It’s also a celebration of the joy that these girls get from pursuing their interests and coming together as a community."

I'm really looking forward to this film. It's so important to show girls' interests as something more than fodder for ridicule.
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An interesting read about the often forgotten sister: Elizabeth.

"Patrick Brontë said that his second daughter had ‘sound common sense’, and perhaps the best tribute came from Charlotte Brontë, who would have looked up to the sister closest to her in age. Elizabeth Gaskell, friend and biographer of Charlotte, remembered that she spoke often of both Maria and Elizabeth, and from Charlotte’s pronouncements she ‘used to believe them to have been wonders of talent and kindness.’"
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