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When it comes to porn magazines, most people think of Hugh Hefner and Playboy. Meet Larry Flynt, the anti-Hefner. Flynt transformed The Hustler Newsletter , a regular promotional piece for his nightclubs, into Hustler Magazine in 1974. Hustler wasn't a "classy" piece like Hefner's Playboy Magazine. It was a raunchy, extremely graphic publication that, in addition to nude women, offered tasteless cartoons, nasty editorials, and ads for everything from sex toys to bestiality films. Where Hefner cultivated a rather cultured, worldly image, Flynt reveled in being the exact opposite - brash, cheesy and classless. Partially paralyzed in a 1978 assassination attempt, Flynt continues to operate his magazine business, and has diversified into clubs, stores, gambling and of course, online porn.
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Amazing... The only known photo still in existence of Abraham Lincoln lying in state.
The only preserved photograph of Lincoln in death. Taken 24 April 1865, by Jeremiah Gurney, Jr., City Hall, Manhattan, NY.
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NASCAR legend Dale Earnhardt shortly before the start of the Daytona 500 on February 18, 2001 - the race that claimed his life when he hit the wall in turn 4 on the last lap. Had he lived, Earnhardt would have turned 66 on April 29, 2017.
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Members of the Baldwin-Felts Detective Agency. headquartered in Bluefield, WV. The Agency provided investigative services to railroads for train robberies and other crimes. They also provided security for mine payroll offices and on board coal trains.

The agency later morphed into little more than a band of thugs employed by coal operators to suppress strikes, to collect intelligence on unions, to prevent labor organizers from entering company grounds and even to evict workers living in company-owned housing who had joined a union, gone on strike or failed to pay rent.

The Agency's most infamous moment was on August 1, 1921, when several Baldwin-Felts gunmen assassinated Matewan, WV police chief Sid Hatfield, who supported union miners, on the steps on the county courthouse in Welch. The gunmen pleaded self defense and were never punished.
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Flanked by members of his family, President Richard Nixon bids farewell to the White House staff after his resignation on August 9, 1974, Nixon had announced his intention to step down live on television to a stunned nation the night before. His presidency was in shambles due to the burgeoning Watergate scandal, thanks in large part to Nixon's own in-house recording system, which captured various seamy goings-on including Nixon personally ordering aides to obstruct the FBI's investigation of the break-in and attempted bugging at Democratic National Headquarters inside the Watergate Hotel.

Volumes have been written about how Nixon's paranoid personality ended up being his downfall. The Watergate affair was actually just the most publicly visible moment in a presidency rife with unsavory episodes and characters, such as the "Dirty Tricks Squad" whose task was to dig up negative personal info about Nixon's perceived enemies, and IRS audits of organizations opposed to Nixon's policies.
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Rescue personnel working to extricate NASCAR great Dale Earnhardt from his car after he hit the wall on the last lap of the 2001 Daytona 500. Earnhardt, however, was already dead from a basal skull fracture.
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Kamikaze pilots receiving their orders in 1944. In a desperate measure to turn the tide of the war in the Pacific, the Japanese resorted to loading planes down with bombs or torpedos, manning them with pilots who had received minimal training, and directing the pilots to crash their planes into US Navy warships.

Although these suicide attacks caused catastrophic damage when successful, it's estimated that only about 14 percent of planes actually reached their targets, with the bulk of them shot out of the sky before impact. Still, it's estimated that kamikazes sank 34 Navy ships, damaged 368 others, killed 4,900 sailors, and wounded over 4,800.
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President Franklin Roosevelt giving a speech in 1938, using one of many specially constructed podiums built for his needs. His legs withered and paralyzed by polio, Roosevelt needed a strong platform upon which he could lean and support the bulk of his weight with his arms while speaking. He adamantly refused to speak while sitting, even though the mere act of standing erect for any length of time was physically exhausting for him.
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President Franklin Delano Roosevelt in 1933, preparing to broadcast. From March 1933 to June 1944, Roosevelt addressed the American people in some 30 speeches via radio, speaking on a variety of topics from banking to unemployment, and with the advent of WWII, to defeating the enemy in Europe and the Far East.

Millions of people found comfort and renewed confidence in these speeches, given in an informal, conversational tone, which became known as the “fireside chats". Keep in mind there were no recording machines back then, so all these "chats" were aired live.

Roosevelt had been quick to understand the inherent power of a medium that was still in its infancy. He also took care to use the simplest possible language, with concrete examples and analogies, so as to be clearly understood by the largest number of Americans. He began many of these nighttime broadcasts with the greeting “My friends,” and referred to himself as “I” and the American people as “you” as if addressing his listeners directly and personally.
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The story behind the famous photo of Johnny Cash giving the finger during his 1969 San Quentin State Prison gig has been revealed.

Photographer Jim Marshall asked the country legend to express what he thought of the prison authorities. Cash replied, "This is for the warden," and flipped off the camera.
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