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Saying Goodbye is not easy...

Words are never adequate in circumstances like these, but I would like to say say how greatly appreciate the many friendships I have been able to build here, how much I appreciate all the good times we had, and look forward to having more if we land in similar places.

I would like to do the best I can to stay connected. That will of course be determined in part by where I see the people going to and investing time and effort in. Right now it looks like

https://www.minds.com/TheCommunityPrinciple is the most promising place to build relationships around shared interests. It also has groups. There is also a G+ Refugee group there for anyone to say hello and possible find people. https://www.minds.com/groups/profile/896384555164274688?referrer=TheCommunityPrinciple

These are some other places where I have a profille, please leave a comment where you can be found once G+ shuts down:
https://www.youtube.com/TheWayToLife

https://www.pluspora.com profile joecarter@pluspora.com

https://gab.ai/JoeCarter

https://mewe.com/profile/5aea37bffca6030a7ea820a4

http://www.thewisdomoflife.com/

https://twitter.com/4HumanitysSake (Rarely used)


I will be here for a while, still sharing, but winding down as this birthing process goes on, mostly to see where people are winding up so we can remain connected and perhaps even build something better.
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An example of early defense mechanisms against antagonists? Perhaps. Stay tuned.

Scientists Are Excited Over These 'Weird' Feathers Preserved in 100-Million-Year-Old Amber

"...Feathers found in Burmese amber dating back 100 million years are so exquisitely preserved that palaeontologists have been able to make a detailed study of their structure... they may have served as a type of decoy, falling away in a predator's grasp, much like a lizard drops its tail to make its escape."

https://www.sciencealert.com/ancient-birds-from-100-million-years-ago-had-really-really-weird-feathers
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An excellent list of references to papers on the molecular dance process that contributes to what we experience as being.

Viral RNA structure-based strategies to manipulate translation

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41579-018-0117-x
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This Week in Virology
On the latest episode of the science podcast This Week in Virology, our guest is Michelle Flenniken from Montana State University in Bozeman, MT. Michelle's laboratory works on honey bee viruses. We start with an overview of honeybees and their importance to the global economy, and the impact of colony collapse disorder. Then on to a discussion of the various viruses of honeybees and their impact, viruses with cool names like 'sacbrood virus' and 'deformed wing virus'. The name tells you what they do to bees. Finally we go over the latest paper from Michelle's lab, showing that not only virus-specific dsRNA, but a non-specific dsRNA can induce antiviral responses in honeybees. Along the way you'll hear how Michelles raises bees and inoculates them with viruses.
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The Day the Mesozoic Died: The Asteroid That Killed the Dinosaurs

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tRPu5u_Pizk
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It's about time:

Viruses use bacteria’s chemical language to time their destruction

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/spy-virus-eavesdrops-on-bacteria-then-obliterates-them/
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Fastest-Ever Cell Contractions Observed in Primitive Invertebrate

"...The microscopic marine animal Trichoplax adhaerens may use rapid changes in cell shape to avoid being ripped apart by forces in the ocean."

https://www.the-scientist.com/news-opinion/fastest-ever-cell-contractions-observed-in-primitive-invertebrate-65207
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