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WHAT IS A SPEECH SOUND DISORDER?
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Articulation and phonological disorders, also called speech sound disorders, are errors made by children (or adults) in which they have difficulty correctly pronouncing sounds, called phonemes. These errors often result in others having difficulty understanding the individual.

Speech disorders can be categorized into two primary types: articulation disorders and phonological disorders. A child with an articulation disorder will have difficulty producing a particular sound (e.g., difficulty saying “r” in words or lisping). Phonological disorders refer to the use of a pattern of errors. Often, a child is able to say the sound correctly but may not use it in the correct position in the word, or will modify sounds. This often results in a simplified production of the word.

Children with speech sound disorders can have difficulty with any of the following:
• Errors in speech sounds characterized by omissions, distortions, substitutions, additions, or incorrect sequencing of speech sounds
• Speech errors can be expected in typical development as a child’s speech system matures. However, an impairment exists when these errors are seen beyond an age where a child should have learned the correct productions.
• Some substitutions and omissions of sounds can be a feature of an accent or dialect, or may be the result of an influence of a second language. These differences in speech would not be considered a disorder.

Does your child have difficulty pronouncing certain speech sounds? Do you have difficulty understanding your child’s speech? Please contact us today at Bilinguistics Speech and Language Services, 512-480-9573. Let us make a plan to address your child’s unique needs.
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WHAT IS AN EXPRESSIVE LANGUAGE DISORDER?
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An expressive language disorder is a type of specific language disorder associated with difficulty speaking, writing, and/or using other symbol systems (i.e. sign language). Expressive language disorders may be developmental, appearing as the child is learning to talk, or acquired due to damage to the brain. Individuals with an expressive language disorder are able to understand language easier than they express it.

Children with an expressive language disorder can have difficulty with any of the following:
• Limited vocabulary use
• Use of non-specific vocabulary (i.e. thing, stuff)
• Difficulty defining or describing
• Unable to recall the appropriate word to use
• Poor grammar
• Short or incomplete sentences
• Difficulty telling stories
• Unable to clearly convey a concept or idea
• Problems putting sentences together coherently

Do your notice that your child has a limited vocabulary or difficulty creating sentences? Please contact us at Bilinguistics Speech and Language Services, 512-480-9573, and we will be happy to help.
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WHAT IS A RECEPTIVE LANGUAGE DISORDER?
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A receptive language disorder is an impairment in the comprehension of a spoken, written, gestural and/or other symbol system. These deficits affect how children function socially or academically. Often, children with a receptive language disorder also have an expressive language disorder.

Children with a receptive language disorder can have difficulty with any of the following:
•                Understanding meaning of gestures
•                Following directions
•                Understanding questions
•                Identifying objects and pictures
•                Taking turns when talking with others
•                Understanding the order of words in a sentence
•                Understanding plurals and verb tenses
•                Understanding age-appropriate vocabulary and knowledge about objects and sequence of events
•                Knowledge of the goals or functions of language (e.g. to obtain a desired object, tell a story, ask questions, comment)
•                Knowledge of how to use language to achieve goals (e.g. appropriately using language to get a desired object)
•                Carrying out cooperative conversations (e.g. perspective-taking and turn-taking)
 
Do you notice that your child has difficulty following directions or understanding vocabulary that other children understand? Are you concerned about your child’s comprehension skills? Please contact us today at Bilinguistics Speech and Language Services, 512-480-9573. We’re here to support you and your child.
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BATH TIME AND BUILDING SPEECH AND LANGUAGE
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These bath time activities will help your child to get CLEAN and also help him or her learn action words and body parts. All you need is a doll/toy, bubble bath (for some extra fun), and YOU!

· Have your child pretend to give his/her doll or toy a bath.  Have your child wash different parts of the doll/toy to target learning names of body parts (e.g., “wash hair,” “wash feet”).

· Ask your child what he/she will wash next to encourage labeling of body parts.

· Sing “Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes” while washing in the tub.

If you want to know more about how we help children, call us at Bilinguistics Speech and Language Services, 512-480-9573, and we’ll be glad to speak with you.
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GLAD TO GO GROCERY SHOPPING
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Get the grocery shopping done AND improve your child’s speech and language skills. Help your child to actively participant at the grocery store and while putting the food away at home. You can also pretend to shop at home and practice the same language you use at the grocery store. Try some of these ideas the next time you’re at the store!

· Practice using location words to describe where food items are in the store and when putting food away at home (e.g., “up high,” “down below,” “on the shelf”).

· Group food items into categories: dairy, meat, fruits, vegetables.

· Pretend to shop at home using real cans and packages of food or plastic toys and have your child put them in a basket while labeling them.

Please contact us to chat about your child’s speech and language needs at Bilinguistics Speech and Language Services, 512-480-9573. We’ll be happy to answer any questions that you have.
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CARS AND COMMUNICATION
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You can support your child’s speech and language development anywhere, even in the car! While you’re on the road to buy groceries or on a road trip, you can help your child describe what he or she sees and practice creating sentences. Read on to find out.

· Describe vehicles you see using descriptive words (e.g., big truck, red bike, fast car, loud horn).

· Model using complete sentences to help your child tell you what they see while riding in the car (e.g., “I see a big truck,” “I see a cow”).

· Sing the “Wheels on the Bus” song and encourage imitation of actions and words.

Do you have questions about your child’s speech and language skills? Contact us at Bilinguistics Speech and Language Services, 512-480-9573, and we will be happy to answer your questions.
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HAVE FUN WALKING AND TALKING
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As speech-language pathologists, our talent is to take any situation and use it to build speech and language skills. Take a walk in the city or countryside and help your children’s speech to GROW! Try these ideas and let us know how it works!

· Label things you see when you go for a walk (e.g., trees, leaves, flowers).  Talk about their colors (e.g., sky - blue, leaves - green)

· Imitate environmental noises that you hear:  “beep beep,” “woof woof,” etc.

· Play with different types of movements (e.g., walking, running, jumping) and talk about them using opposites: slow/fast, up/down, inside/outside, stop/go.

Are you concerned about your child’s speech and language skills? Call us today at Bilinguistics Speech and Language Services, 512-480-9573.
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PLAY WITH A PURPOSE!
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There are SO MANY opportunities we can create for speech and language development during play. Your child can play with his or her favorite toys AND you can support their speech and language development. Here are some ideas to get you started!

· Throw or roll a ball back and forth with your child.  Say/sign “I want the ball” or “My turn” to model taking turns for your child.

· Put toys out of reach and have your child request them by saying/signing the name of the toy or “I want _____.”

· Name each item as you clean up the toys and use the same phrase each time (e.g., “Put away block,” “Put away ball.”)

If you’re unsure whether your child’s speech and language is developing appropriately, feel free to contact us at Bilinguistics Speech and Language Services at 512-480-9573. We will answer any questions you have.
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GETTING DRESSED FOR COMMUNICATION SUCCESS
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Help your child learn clothing names and create short sentences while they’re getting dressed or while you’re throwing a load of laundry into the washer. We’ve even included one of our favorite books that can help children increase their clothing vocabulary. Try out some of these activities today!

· Gather a variety of clothing items (e.g., pants, shirts, socks, hats) and play dress-up with your child.  Take turns “putting on” the clothing and dress your child’s favorite stuffed animal.

· Have your child put clothes in the washer, dryer, or in drawers. Practice labeling each item AND get the laundry done.

· Read the book Froggy Gets Dressed by Jonathan London and talk about the clothes you need when you go outside on cold winter days.

Do you have questions about this strategy or how your child’s speech and language is developing? Please contact us at Bilinguistics Speech and Language Services, 512-480-9573, and we will be glad to help you!
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MORE THAN MUNCHING DURING MEALTIME
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Apples and bananas video
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mortLgRlPV4

Speech and language activities can happen ALL day! See how you can help your child’s speech and language GROW during breakfast, lunch, and dinner. All you need for these activities is food from your kitchen, a blanket, your child’s favorite toy, and ads from the supermarket. Did you know that helping your child’s communication improve could be this easy?

· Let your child help prepare a meal by gathering food items together.  Talk about what you need and where things are (e.g., “up high,” “inside the refrigerator”).
 
· Have a picnic! Have your child pretend to feed his/her favorite stuffed animal or doll.  Model requesting by signing/saying “more” and/or “I want ___.”

· Cut out pictures of food and put them in groups (e.g., “I eat” and “I drink,” or “sweet,” “salty,” “hot,” “cold”).

If you have questions about how your child’s speech and language is developing, please call us at Bilinguistics Speech and Language Services, 512-480-9573. We’ll be happy to help!
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