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Seeing Past the Hype - Comparing Model 3 to Gasmobiles

This may not be a popular post, but I think it's still worth sharing. I've been thinking a lot about the Model 3 for the past few days, and especially about Elon Musk's repeated claims that it is the best car you can buy for $35,000, or there is not a better car at that price point. (I should note that I'm a huge fan of Tesla in general, and I loved test driving the Model S. I like their goals, their approach to things, and the direction they are taking the industry.)

So, I decided to do an unscientific comparison of a large number of mid-sized and compact cars, highlighting the aspects that are the most important to me in a car. I also added a few stats that are not at all important to me, like 0-60 time and top speed. I created custom builds on each manufacturer's web site, adding as many useful features and packages as possible without going above a benchmark of $36,000 MSRP. I also had to source some of the stats from several different web sites, so I can't vouch 100% for every stat, but it should be fairly accurate. When possible, I selected hybrid versions of vehicles for extra range and efficiency.

I'm not considering tax credits in my comparison, nor was Musk in his claims (the credits will expire at some point anyway), but of course, in a practical sense, they should be considered if you can get them. However, I'm also listing MSRP for all of the other vehicles, which most buyers will get a discount on. I am also not considering the inherent benefits of EVs (charging at home, cheaper fuel).

I believe if you're out to buy an EV, you should consider the Model 3, Bolt, and upcoming long-range Leaf. If you're out to buy a great car and have a bottomless wallet, I still think the Model 3 is an excellent pick, possibly the best mid-sized sedan because of the available autopilot features. Just be prepared to pay.

But is the Model 3 the best car that you can buy for $35,000? After creating this comparison, I really don't see how, at least not on paper. There are too many important features left off that other manufacturers are making standard or optional at lower price points. Let me know if you have ideas of other important stats to consider.

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1IiT_AQ_LJykZmwcesSAYME5tbYtk_V7ZxpY_4ZeBI3Y/edit#gid=0
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All else aside, the rumors were true: the Model 3, claimed to be the best car for the price bar none, will not come standard with heated seats. Those are all extra $5,000 with the luxury package. My base model Leaf that cost well under $30,000 before incentives came with heated seats and steering wheel standard. Is that a small thing? Maybe. Is it a deal breaker? Maybe not. Is it stupid? I think so.

I've still got my deposit down, but not decided yet. Everything else looks great so far.
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Things are not looking good for Faraday Future.
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As stated in the video, medium and long range fully electric planes are just not possible with current technology. But short range flights with few passengers are right around the corner and promise significant fuel cost savings and legitimate use cases (chartered tours, flight training).
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Seems like the Supercharging policy at Tesla is getting rather complicated. Not that the program from Nissan is much clearer (I've posted before about how confusing the "no charge to charge" program is)... I'm not sure what the situation from GM looks like. Any Volt or Bolt owners aware of what free charging options are offered?
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This is pretty despicable behavior from the Connecticut dealerships. Apparently, the moral compass of these folks consists of "If it benefits me, it's ok to do. If I don't like what another company is doing, I am justified in going to any lengths to stop them."

It's rather unfortunate, to say the least. Not the least because state governments are just eating it up.
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I've heard vague references to cooled fast-charging technology like this, but this explanation is really clear and easy to understand. This may be the standard for EV charging in a few years.
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This rate of expansion is impressive, regardless of what you drive. It also benefits other EV drivers as Tesla's competitors are pushed to match the expansion.
Doubling the supercharger network worldwide in 2017, 150% growth in US
To think in just ~8 months, there will be double the number of supercharger stations and destination chargers worldwide. Even more than double across the US. More than 1,000 being added in California alone.

Check out their updated supercharger map: https://www.tesla.com/findus/supercharger
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Well, we can dream, right? Someday these may be mass produced and reasonably priced. Electrically powered Vertical Take Off & Landing vehicles would get rid of grid lock and potentially make personal transportation much more efficient. It's a long ways out still though.
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I discovered this channel a few weeks ago. She really does great news updates, and uploads videos regularly.

In this episode, news on Tesla, Lucid, and more.
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