Post has attachment
A Little Happiness

The Critique:

The expression says it all and makes an immediate impact with its story – technology does indeed connect us is some wonderful ways. Perspective adds drama as it joins spectacular light that reveals superb details. There is nice vertical pull in this portrait framing choice. Spatial relationships are strong as is the balance within the frame. It could have gone B&W but I chose to keep color – an added component of the happiness of a sunny day.

What I had learned:

Try different perspectives.

www.roxanneoverton.com – where you will find more photography and information on my photography books.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Painterly Walkers

The Critique:

Wisps of color and whimsical lines portray the people through the motion filter of ICM (intentional camera movement). The pattern of arcs makes a powerful impact. Rich and bold colors compliment the photograph. The bold vertical column on the right anchors the shot. It’s all about impressionism – hints of reality seen through an artist’s eye. Done in camera, this is what the sensor captured in 1/6th of a second with the camera moving in an upward arc.

What I had learned:

Ordinary scenes can become magical with a little imagination and a dance with the camera.

www.roxanneoverton.com – where you will find more photography and information on my photography books.




Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Perspective at SFMOMA

The Critique:

Bold, dramatic shapes join a diagonal dotted line to grab my attention and make an immediate impact. A big intended V forms an inverted triangle in the center of the shot. One side is balance mainly in dark negative space which plays off the various intricate patterns in the lighter circular area. Opposing lines create interest and energy. A kiss of color adds even more life to the shot. Spatial relationships are hidden in this abstract view. If you don’t know the subject, you might be hard pressed to understand. But it’s spunky and fun and interesting and it successfully holds my eye to inspect over and over again.

What I have learned:

I like to go back to familiar places that I have shot before. It’s fun to challenge my eye to find a new perspective.

www.roxanneoverton.com – where you will find more photography and information on my photography books.

Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Legions Walking

The Critique:

Electrifying fun in multiple exposures as a brilliant sun backlights the walkers. Once was not enough for this shot – it took two times to capture the fun. Dazzling colors wash the scene bathed in warmth. Lines and angles catch my eye and patterns emerge everywhere. A long exposure for each shot insured that motion and energy would dominate the overall impressions. Nice spatial relationships – good details – it may be mayhem but it’s crystal clear.

What I had learned:

When the scene is ordinary – explore ways to add interest – in the camera.

www.roxanneoverton.com – where you will find more photography and information on my photography books.

Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Through the Glass

The Critique:

Light plays with visual senses as it bounces off glass and splashes across the floor. Diagonal lines form where there is no structure – how fun is that? Bold vertical lines anchor the shot and compliment the portrait choice for framing. Grids of lines create geometric patterns that add substance and interest. The outside is invited in through reflections as pots of flowers seemingly float in the air. The lady is rimmed in backlight and adds a focal point that enhances spatial relationships. Nice mix of nature and manmade structure joins vibrant color to add energy and warmth.

What I have learned:

It’s fall again. It’s the time of year that the light plays with abandon in this particular building. I like to show up for it.

Shooting with Doug and Scott.

www.roxanneoverton.com – where you will find more photography and information on my photography books.




Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Cathedral of Light

The Critique:

Patterns of light splashing across the wall and floor create high drama. It complements the soaring ceiling with its brilliantly lit beams. Complexity is added by window grids and buildings offering geometric gifts of their own outside the confines of this lobby. All of it frames the backlit figure crossing through in the company of his shadow. Spatial relationships are bold and clear. The tall vertical columns on the left anchor the shot nicely. Colors are rich and add vibrance to the photograph.

What I have learned:

I can never visit this building too often. The light is always changing and telling different visual stories.

www.roxanneoverton.com – where you will find more photography and information on my photography books.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Pass By

The Critique:

It’s the light playing hide and seek that draws my eye to this spot. (That and Doug Kaye fixated on it as well.) Bold lines, formed by concrete anchor the shot. Whimsical patterns of intricacy adorn the floor and side wall adding both color and interest. The lady is captured by a triangular shape fixing her in place. Light reflects up from the floor to tease just enough detail to pull my eye and hold it. Spatial relationships are strong. But it comes back to the light – bouncing here and there – it steals the show.

What I had learned:

Follow the experts when I’m lucky enough to shoot with them. And learn, learn.

www.roxanneoverton.com – where you will find more photography and information on my photography books.


Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Contemplation

The Critique:

Beautiful tones of gray drape the fog shrouded sea in quiet beauty. A lone man contemplates at the edge of our continent. The darkly reflecting pool of water anchors the shot and sets the stage for the mysteries beyond. Nice triangular shapes of rocks add harmony and nice balance. They also contribute to spatial relationships that are muted in the mists. Horizontal lines serve as powerful guides across the photography – horizontal planes of texture define the story.

What I had learned:

Go back. See places again. There is always something different.

www.roxanneoverton.com – where you will find more photography and information on my photography books.



Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
It’s All about Light

The Critique:

Light fixes elements in time – a moment captured so that one can look back and enjoy the intricacies of the gifts of illumination. These people are caught in arcs of wondrous proportions. A triangle of lights subtly holds them in space. The elements of this rich environment are plentiful. Patterns and grids provide avenues of travel for my eye. But it’s the light – hiding and revealing this city wonderland that is the star of the show.

What I had learned:

Shoot with people better than me and soak up knowledge! Many thanks to Doug and Scott for sharing their shoot with me.

www.roxanneoverton.com – where you will find more photography and information on my photography books.


Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Blue and White

The Critique:

A crisp blue and white color theme brings a touch of brightness and energy to this striking shot. Architectural elements weave throughout the scene splashing lines and intricate patterns everywhere. The strong vertical pull compliments the choice of a portrait frame. Intersecting lines lead my eye one way, and then another, as I investigate the photograph. Everything is nicely anchored by the curved lines of railing a building facade. I love the tones of blue – how they delineate shapes and add overall interest. Spatial relationships are a bit mysterious, which is fine. In abstracts it’s all about lines and shapes and tones.

What I had learned:

Get closer to my subject.

www.roxanneoverton.com – where you will find more photography and information on my photography books.

Photo
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded