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"When I have loved books most in my life, it’s because I wanted to kind of bury myself in them and stay, and I’d love to create that experience for other people."

If you loved the Divergent series, you won't want to miss Veronica Roth's new book -- Carve the Mark -- or this exclusive interview about it:

https://parnassusmusing.net/2017/01/15/veronica-roth/

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Ann Patchett considers current events and the books that have made her happy recently:

"I’ve got a card on my desk from my friend Charles Strobel’s ordination as a priest in 1970. It’s the size of a holy card but it’s plain — no prayer, no saint — just a quote by Robert F. Kennedy. I used to pick it up once or twice a year and read it, but recently I’ve been reading it every day. It goes like this, 'Few will have the greatness to bend history itself, but each of us can work to change a small portion of events, and in the total of all those acts will be written the history of this generation. Each time a man stands up for an ideal, or acts to improve the lots of others or strikes out against injustice, he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope, and crossing each other from a million different centers of energy and daring, those ripples build a current that can sweep down the mightiest walls of oppression and resistance.'"

https://parnassusmusing.net/2017/01/10/notes-from-ann-thought-for-the-day/

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"If ever there was a year to turn off the television, throw the phone out the window, and pick up a book, this was it. Lucky for us, 2016 was a knockout year in publishing." - Ann Patchett reveals her favorite reads of the year!

(This is a fun one to share with your book club -- lots of good reading suggestions here.)

https://parnassusmusing.net/2016/12/14/ann-patchett-best-books-2016/

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No one, not even the most prolific artist, makes art constantly. Everyone needs a little time to rest and take things in, to balance producing with consuming. And that makes us wonder: What do great writers read, watch, do, eat, and daydream about — not when they’re working or researching, but in their downtime?

The first creators to take our "Authors In Real Life" quiz have written two of the most arresting books of 2016 — novels that you read, sit with, think about, then pass to a friend with instructions that they must read them, too, so you can discuss afterwards. Get to know Colson Whitehead (Underground Railroad) and Yaa Gyasi (Homegoing).

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"The best of me is always going to be in the book. I gave the book everything. I’m proud of it. I can sign it or read from it or tweet about it or gift wrap it but the book itself is still the same. If you’ve got that, you’ve got me." - Ann Patchett on her #1 New York Times bestselling new novel, Commonwealth

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Perhaps it makes perfect sense that in 2016 we’d be drawn to all these books about 1969, "the year America lost its mind and found its soul." (Our nation certainly seems to have achieved the “lost its mind” part — maybe finding our soul will come next.)

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Think small: Some of our favorite new releases this year have come from publishers you may not have heard of, but which are publishing books you absolutely need in your life if you love great literature!

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"Q: If you could go back and tell the Brit Bennett who was just starting to write this novel one thing, what would it be?

A: Be patient, kid, because you will spend your entire adult life with this book. It will be bad long before it is ever good, but stick with it, because in the end, it will be worth it."

An exclusive interview with Brit Bennett, author of the smashing debut novel, The Mothers.

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"When I dream of some tiny step to counteract the current madness, I think about how nice it would be to make a safe place for myself, my family, my friends, and total strangers, a place that is quiet and cheerful, a place that welcomes everyone exactly as they are, while at the same time encouraging them to be better, smarter, and more curious. A place that celebrates different points of view (and yes, in different I include the free and respectful exchange of political points of view that are not my own). I would like to build a place where people would feel cherished for their life experiences, where people could learn from history and be comforted by art. A place where babies are welcome, children can play, and teenagers feel respected. A place where people who are pulled in a hundred different directions can find a moment’s peace, and old people would be offered a comfortable chair to sit while they read a book." - Ann Patchett

Ann's blog is published on Musing, the magazine produced by Parnassus Books. (Mary Laura Philpott is the editor.)
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