Post is pinned.Post has attachment
Google+ sends everyone to this collection. If you interested in these topics:
* Nature Through the Eyes of a Biologist
* Building Ponds Lakes and Streams
* Wildflowers and Natural Landscapes
* Waterfront Property and Real Estate Investing
* Waterfront Living and Lifestyle
then click https://plus.google.com/u/0/109081559165699794062/palette
to find our best collections.
Or you can simply follow our profile to get posts on all these topics. Thank you !

image: wildflowers at sunset at Crater Lake Oregon
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Finding fish in lakes and ponds during summer

OK yes you can just buy a fish finder and wander randomly until you bump into fish.... or , you can use your brain to be much more strategic and quick!

In a broad sense of most fishing waters, oxygen concentrations at the surface are most always at or near saturation. This would be a good place to find fish except that most of the activity is in deeper water where prey can find cover and forage. Colder water fish like trout and salmon also need cooler water than the surface during a hot summer. So how do you tell where this magical depth is that provides 1) cool water 2) enough oxygen to support the target fish species and 3) enough forage to attract good size fish? welllllllll we will tell you....

Unless a lake or pond is really sterile with clear water right to the bottom, the oxygen levels will begin to decline at depths that light cannot penetrate. Yes this happens very often right around the thermocline, but dragging a thermometer to find this layer is slow. The easy way to find the fish the old fashion way is to attach what is called a secchi disk to your line. Secchi disks are simply 8 inch diameter discs made of anything that does not float with the upper left and lower right quarters painted ( or "sharpied") black. Just lower the disk down to where it disappears. This usually marks the coolest water with the best oxygen concentration. Be aware if the temperature at the secchi depth is 80 F, you still will not find trout, but you will find many other cool to warm water sport fish.

Now there is one more step.... mark that depth and now follow it over to where the bottom of the lake / pond matches this depth... BANG! Fish! We suggest fishing just a few feet above and below this zone until you lose the bite.

Where this does NOT work: really murky / muddy lakes or those with heavy algae blooms will lose their light before the water sufficiently cools. You still need to run a thermometer down to your measured secchi depth to ensure the water is within the comfort range of the target fish species.

Please do comment / follow etc and let us know how our fishing tips are helping you! www.trouthooker.net
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Temperature and Trout Fishing Streams Ponds & Lakes

The problem with trying to set "fences" for biological limits is the massive diversity within the target set of species. Northern brook trout and redband trout are vastly different beasts. Sure, a person needs to start somewhere, but choosing a single temperature limit for all populations and subspecies in the group is a bit blunt.

We have made much of our living stretching the thermal possibilities for most all salmonids in the habitats we build. We see different limits and reactions down to at least an area code level of geography. In our experience it is much better to observe the activity of the fish instead of relying on rules of thumb for temperature limits. If the fish appear even a bit sluggish, one does not need to take a temperature to decide not to fish for that species in that location. A stressed fish is not going to appear mid-channel in an active feeding lane. They will be more likely hugging the bottom where there actually is a bit cooler water with a potentially higher O2 concentration. They will be holding tight as well unless they are absolutely starving.

Temperature stress in a lake or pond is a bit more mysterious since cooler water is usually available down deep. The stress comes from deeper cooler waters becoming oxygen depleted which forces cold water fish like trout and salmon to become squeezed into a middle temperature zone that is suboptimal for both temperature and oxygen concentrations. This can be seen on a fish finder, but is more difficult to observe with the naked eye in murky waters. This is also the reason clear water lakes are better for trout since light penetration to the bottom of the lake allows vegetation to maintain oxygen levels via photosynthesis. The one glaring sign of thermal and oxygen stress in ponds and lakes is one or a few fish gulping at the surface. This is a sign of the final throes of death for that fish and a very telling sign of stress for the rest of the fish. Obviously this is a better time to enjoy the beach or paddling instead of fishing on that lake.


Use your ability to observe and let that be your real guide. It is not that difficult.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Summer is time for fishing beautiful mountain lakes & ponds
Today's tip for fishing a high lake / pond is to watch for amphibians, particularly newts & salamanders. Any pond that has a preponderance of newts especially will have few if any fish. The reason is fish like trout are faster swimmers and out compete the amphibians for prey. This is even true for many newt species like rough skinned newts that are immune to fish due to their poison skin. Frogs are less of an indicator since they can utilize shallower habitat. If you see frogs in deeper water, keep hiking since any trout would have eaten that frog in a heartbeat. ( Keep an eye on our Fishing tips by Biologists blog/collection as we will post several articles on fishing mountain lakes this summer)

#fly #fishing #hiking #backpacking #trout #camping #wilderness
www.trouthooker.net
Photo
Photo
7/21/17
2 Photos - View album
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
How to find the best trophy fishing lakes ponds & streams
When searching for quality fishing we can often feel lost in the wilderness. Vast expanses of seemingly non-descript waters hide subtle clues of where those trophy trout, salmon, pike and bass concentrate. Before you charge on to the obvious structure, you have to look at the much larger picture. Each lake pond and stream is unique and few are worthy of your time That expensive fish finder is useless if the big fish are a mile away. You have to find the right neighborhood before you can find which door to knock on.

We use these same techniques whether we are fly fishing in Scotland or consulting a client seeking to purchase / create a trophy fishing property

The first thing to sort out when presented with a map that can often be more water than land is the sun. Few trophy size fish live where the days are short. Even in geologies where nutrient levels are low, large fish grow where the summer sun reaches the water at least 9-10 hours each day. While that east-west laying lake is visually gorgeous, it is not worth our time if there is a high ridge casting a shadow over the water thus limiting the water's exposure to the sun. In the northern hemisphere, that ridge would be to the south of the lake with the opposite true in the southern hemisphere. Readers might think this is bad because it will warm the water. Warmer waters are actually good to a point. Just like oxygen, some is good, too much is deadly. Trophy coldwater trout and salmon fisheries still need sun. They also need a higher quality water source to compensate the solar exposure. We will discuss Hydrology in the future.

These lessons can be learned face to face for those who come to fish Scotland with us in late May where we will share the details of our knowledge to find the best waters of lakes ponds and streams for trophy fishing
See trip details at http://www.nomadhill.com/scotland-fishing-2017
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Today's fishing tip... Spend 10 days with a world class trophy fishing habitat designer and the best ghillies and guides in Scotland this May!

If you have even dreamed of fly fishing, this is a trip for the ages as we chase Scottish Atlantic salmon and very rare arctic char from the wilderness of the Highlands to the lap of luxury at Leys Castle. We will also divulge fishing and biology secrets we never share publicly. Join us this May! http://www.nomadhill.com/scotland-fishing-2017 You need not be an expert fly fisher for this trip.

#fishing #travel #lochs #lakes #rivers #ponds #scotland
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Our biggest fishing tip? Find a local fishing pond lake, river or stream within cell range then set aside work time to answer calls from the shoreline. What? You say you won't get any fishing done? Perhaps that will be true, but something else will happen.... you will actually relax due to the natural surroundings far from the harsh lighting of the office. When we do this our thoughts become clearer and our logic sharper.

None of us are getting any younger. Most of us complain we don't spend enough time fishing or relaxing in nature. Why wait for retirement to become a great fisherman? You can still live life while you build a future. Come see how we are dealing with all of this by reading our personal story in the comments in this article... think and enjoy! 4 Fly Fishing Retirement Myths.

#ponds #lakes #rivers #waterfront #living #flyfishing #retirement #fishing #travel
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
Would you buy fishing flies from a homeless lady? This would make a terrific last minute Hanukkah or Christmas gift / stocking stuffer for the fishing addict - even if you have to give a card and deliver the flies later. If you purchase, let us know how they fish on your local pond or lake.


This may not be a fishing tip, but we really liked what Anglers Addiction from Pueblo CO is doing here.
Debbie is a homeless woman who comes into the shop to tie flies so she can earn some money. We give Debbie a hand up and now she is tying down to size 30 parachute dry fly. Please support Debbie and order some flies tied by her. Anglers Addiction donates the material for Debbie and she can pay her direct if you wish. Anglers Addiction shop number is 719-296-5886, Debbie comes in everyday to tie flies and she is now getting really good with foam flies and emergers.
Homeless Flies
Homeless Flies
anglers-addiction.myshopify.com
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
When searching for the perfect trout fishing river , pond or lake there are just a handful of elements to look for: temperature, oxygen levels, sunshine, water chemistry and stable flow regime. Yes these are elements that spring creeks possess, but there are larger rivers that also blend these attributes into stellar fisheries. The Bow River in Alberta Canada and the Deschutes River in Oregon are such rivers that provide for trophy size rainbow trout as well as brown trout. In this case there may one more magic element at work: the genetics of the rainbow trout are likely a long lived fish that allows the rainbows of the Bow to compete with the browns instead of being displaced by them as we see in too many rivers. This is not the genetics of a hatchery "kamloops" that had its qualities diluted for decades. Don't be fooled by that label if you buy trout fingerlings.

Looking at this image, one might guess this shape of trout fattened up in fertile lakes or ponds. That would be a good guess, but the Bow doesn't have a reservoir. The river itself holds the magic habitat. So how does one find such rivers or even decide where to fish on local rivers? Yes you can collect piles of travel brochures or links, but researching maps, government water quality, climate and hydrology reports will tell you the real story. One can learn an amazing amount simply by reading a topographical map. One day we may public an ebook about searching waters for trout if there is enough interest. In the mean time we suggest you spend part of your off-season researching to see if you can find hidden springs in lakes or magic fishing rivers like the Bow. You could also just give Paula Shearer a call. She looks like she knows a few things....

#trophy   #trout   #fly   #fishing  
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
How to think like a fish: Answer: live with what you are fishing for
We've gained incredible insights from living with game fish in aquariums or in a pond with trout, bass and bluegill / bream / sunfish. There is no substitute for observation.... especially during a retrieve when you are trying to figure out just what sort of wiggle will entice a strike. If you wish to catch trophy fish, you need to think like one.

One of the saddest moments of keeping fish in an aquarium is when a fish dies. There is a silver lining here however. The motions of a wounded fish are more erratic than most people think. Seeing young fingerlings die is exactly what those trophy trout and bass are looking for. Emulate those jerky movements and it's Fish On! The motion is difficult to describe which is why you need to see it for yourself. The best way we can portray it is a 3D random motion which is why a muddler minnow has been so deadly in fly fishing for so many years. Before the streamer is water logged, it will rise and fall more naturally.

Go out and put together a simple aquarium and stock it with fingerlings. It's gruesome when they pick each other off until there are just a couple fish left, but the lesson will be learned. Then go out and think like a "trophy fish" !

In our next update we will show you why the most popular "attractor" fly pattern is actually a deadly life-like streamer. Tight Lines!
Keep following Fishing Tips By Biologists
https://plus.google.com/u/0/collection/gl9sb
We will update you with ways to think about fishing right before you need the info!

#aquarium   #fish   #flyfishing  
Photo
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded