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Teachers and parents of teens and young adults with ADHD: Alone? Educate the whole child.

The student is infinitely more important than the subject matter. SEL (Social Emotional Learning) promotes proven practices that address the needs of the person. Educating forms the foundation, but supporting learners is paramount.

*Hip, hip, hooray! Engage in a fun, interactive way.
*Learn to think outside the box. Provide a wide variety of tools, then let them go.
*Incorporate better academics. Integrate high-level thinking.
*Look at the future. Increases likelihood of getting a college degree.
*Discover a peaceful environment. Celebrate less bullying.

"Our kids" can be a handful. Support teachers in their good work.

#ADHD
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Teachers and parents of teens and young adults with ADHD: An untaught subject? Spelling with technology.

People sometimes fault schools as a result of the use of technology/spell check. Luckily, technology can be used to help people with spelling difficulties to edit their writing. Look for specific tools that increase understanding.

*Go beyond the single word. Use context to choose words in spell check.
*Try text-to-speech apps. Further comprehension through listening.
*Invest in contextual spell check. Look beyond the letters, considering the entire sentence.
*Understand the word as a whole. Gain confidence as the overall quality to work improves.
*Provide for a significant learning curve. Let students gain confidence.

"Our kids" like to be independent. Champion their work with support. Be specific.

#ADHD
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Teachers and parents of teens and young adults with ADHD: Things in disarray? Improve executive functioning.

Awareness and directive capabilities of the mind are critical to academic success. Through these abilities, students can independently decide where to focus attention. When there are difficulties completing tasks on their own, executive functioning may be the root of the problem.

*Create a warm introduction. Refer to tools explicitly and often.
*Cue, direct, coordinate. Provide moment-to-moment guidance to improve self-regulation.
*Establish explicit goals. Break assignments into smaller tasks leading to long-term plans.
*Make connections. Emphasize that students are in charge of their learning.
*Be a cheerleader. Honor their skills by pointing out improved performances.

"Our kids" see themselves as being different. Maintain a self-image of being empowered.

+Edutopia​​​​ #ADHD 
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Teachers and parents of teens and young adults with ADHD: Isolation? Peer mentoring

Having someone the same age to talk to benefits both people. Support can be emotional, social, and academic. Discovery through support is key.

*Look for problems to repair. Support working together to discover solutions.
*Implement reflection time. Use rituals for introspection.
*Teach empathy and concern. Give to others; receive as well.
*Establish safe zones. Let non-judgemental honesty be your guide.
*Make it happen together. Encourage students seeking peers for support.

"Our kids" often isolate themselves. Help bridge the gap with others.

#ADHD
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Teachers and parents of teens and young adults with ADHD: Want new ideas? Use the magic of innovation.

Teaching strategies help students learn desired core contents and be able to develop achievable goals in the future. The trick is to develop the right techniques to bring success to targeted audiences. Rely on best practices for improving your craft.

*Deliver instruction creatively. Talk, but use images and tactile activities too.
*Engage students throughout the lesson. Reach out to struggling students too.
*Provide feedback for thinking. Make them work for the answer.
*Laugh until you drop. Use humor to boost retention.
*Count the 8 minutes that matter most. Start with excitement to keep the audience absorbed.

"Our kids" need action to keep things moving. Integrate cross disciplines to open their senses to deeper learning.

+Edutopia​​​​ #ADHD
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"All the world is a laboratory to the inquiring mind." Martin Fisher
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"Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn." Benjamin Franklin
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Teachers and parents of teens and young adults with ADHD: Bad grades? Maybe it's bullying.

Bullying is often known for its psychological impact. New research shows that students who are bullied have lower academic achievement. They also have a greater dislike of school and less confidence in their studies.

*Know what it is. Watch out for students being seen as weak prey.
*Set the ground rules early. Send a copy of your policy home the first week.
*Take a stand. Commit to protecting every student, no matter what.
*Be responsible for outcomes. Don't wait for someone else to step in.
*Make a promise. Let your kids know that you will keep them safe...always.

"Our kids" want to avoid the fray. Provide a safe haven for private conversations that won't be shared.

+Education World​​​​ #ADHD +mindshift
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Teachers and parents of teens and young adults with ADHD: Get involved? Try these tips.

Myths about education relate to the role of parents. While parent-teacher interaction benefits students, the methods of getting there can be confusing. The team is not homogeneous, and should address specific needs and abilities.

*Use home learning activities. Support without PTA's.
*Acknowledge the different roles. Base conversations on mutual respect and trust.
*Avoid verbal attacks. Become effectively involved in solutions.
*Consider expertise for curriculum input. Include parents with the knowledge base.
*Encourage low-income and limited-employment parents to be more involved. Show the value in education.

"Our kids" need help finding a way to make connections with teachers. Create a home environment to easily discuss what's going on.

#ADHD +Edutopia
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Teachers and parents of teens and young adults with ADHD: Grades got you down? Think self-image.

Imagine school populations with multi-ethnic students who enter two or three years below grade level. It's happening everywhere. It's critical to move beyond labels to discover success.

*Engage toward common academic goals. Make objectives universal.
*Show what hard work looks like. Take the lead and demonstrate actively.
*Improve through genuine effort. Work hard against adversity.
*Foster student agency. Develop an authentic voice.
*Put students in the driver's seat. See selves as powerful agents.

"Our kids" see challenges as opportunities for failure. Use low-stakes activities to build confidence.

+Edutopia​​​​​ #ADHD
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