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Professors and parents of teens and young adults with ADHD: Want more learning? Work beyond your knowledge.

It's important to remember what moves you into education. In higher ed, there are opportunities to teach, learn, and research. Shaping the future of your field weighs heavy too. What about the kids?

*Become an expert in teaching and learning. Develop effective instructional strategies.
*Accept everyone. Meet the needs of all.
*Consider impact of instructional management. Include visual outlines, attendance procedures, making time for questions.
*Vary things often. Try learner-centered activities., group work, active discussion.
*Keep the passion. Focus on understanding, not just GPA.

"Our kids" are constantly checking their grades. Explain how they work.

#ADHD
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"Zeal without knowledge is fire without light." (Thomas Henry Huxley)
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"The difference between ordinary and extraordinary is that little extra."
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Teachers and parents of teens and young adults with ADHD: What's a growing problem? Cheating

*Explain and model character and moral behavior. Give a clear picture of expectations.
*Report infractions immediately. Implement a no-holds-barred policy.
*Establish examples of plagiarism. Teach how to avoid it.
*Encourage to seek loftier goals. Preach, it's not just about the grades.
*Grab up the goodies. Collect cell phones and bags before assessments.

"Our kids" seek grades, often more than anything else. Consider other ways to stem the problem.

#ADHD +Edutopia
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Teachers and parents of teens and young adults with ADHD: Stuck with bad behavior? Ask Edie, the Dog Whisperer (in training).

What made me think of getting a Power Breed dog? Rottweilers are smart, playful, and loyal...beautiful too.

70-pounds of Rottie puppy walks through my front door. "Casper sit!" He does. Amazing! "Casper down." Nothing. "Casper down." Nothing. "Casper down." He walks away.

5 minutes later...

"Casper down." He does.

Moral? Give instructions one at a time and repeat as necessary.

#ADHD
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Teachers and parents of teens and young adults with ADHD: Unmotivated? Give examples of like-minded strugglers.

Put things in perspective by discovering strengths. Look at Albert Einstein, Steven Spielberg, and Leonardo DaVinci. Even they had terrible times with some tasks too.

*Help them identify gifts. Seek and find.
*Use strengths to support weaknesses. Think about what you can do.
*Make encouraging comments. Be specific, not general.
*Guide in ways to develop abilities. Collaborate as an expert.
*Show academics as a strategy. Compare as a path, not a destination.


"Our kids" focus what they cannot do. Encourage lessons that let them show off.

#ADHD +TeachThought​​
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Teachers and parents of teens and young adults with ADHD: Bad stuff happening? Band together.

The stress of students' lives isn't going away. Nearly half of American children experience at least one adversity. The impact varies, so should starting points.

*Acknowledge natural disasters. Establish newly adapted routines.
*Point out that bereavement can be common. Use conversation to discuss the dramatic loss of a loved one.
*Prepare for controversial breaking news. Take advantage of teachable moments.
*Look out for trauma. Include sleepiness, acting out.
*Calm the body and mind. Regulate behavior through relaxation.

"Our kids" might let emotions ride, sometimes out of control. Encourage quiet time when things get chaotic.

#ADHD +MindShift​
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"Setting goals is the first step in turning the invisible into the visible." (Tony Robbins)
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"I believe that every person is born with talent." (Maya Angelou)
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Teachers and parents of teens and young adults with ADHD: Troubles? Assume the best.

Thinking the best about students is great for you and them. You might think otherwise, but building self-esteem increases learning. It makes your job more fun too.

*Look low and high. Give yourself a reason.
*Do a refresh. Assume they're not aware of mistakes.
*Make sure the rules are clear. Repeat so they're not forgotten.
*Transform your tone. Watch how you speak.
*Remember that childhood is a sensitive time. Develop identity and mindset.

"Our kids" can be uncertain, academically and emotionally. Use the best investment in the future - hope.

+TeachThought​​ #ADHD
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