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Corina Marinescu

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Nanoparticles Could Help Overcome Treatment-Resistant Breast Cancer
Researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine have been able to generate multifunctional RNA nanoparticles that could overcome treatment resistance in breast cancer, potentially making existing treatments more effective in these patients.

The study, published in the Dec. 14, 2016, online edition of American Chemical Society’s ACS Nano and led by Xiaoting Zhang, PhD, associate professor in the Department of Cancer Biology at the UC College of Medicine, shows that using a nanodelivery system to target HER2-positive breast cancer and stop production of the protein MED1 could slow tumor growth, stop cancer from spreading and sensitize the cancer cells to treatment with tamoxifen, a known therapy for estrogen-driven cancer.

MED1 is a protein often produced at abnormally high levels in breast cancer cells that when eliminated is found to stop cancer cell growth. HER2-positive breast cancer involves amplification of a gene encoding, or programming, the protein known as human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, which also promotes the growth of cancer cells. MED1 co-produces (co-expresses) and co-amplifies with HER2 in most cases, and Zhang’s previous studies have shown their interaction plays key roles in anti-estrogen treatment resistance.

PR:
https://www.healthnews.uc.edu/news/?/28440/

Journal article:
http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acsnano.6b05910

#research   #breastcancer   #nanoparticles   #science   #medicine  
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Heidi Henderson's profile photo
 
I think we'll find nanoparticles helping in many areas of cancer care.

Corina Marinescu

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Researchers create organic nanowire synaptic transistors that emulate the working principles of biological synapses
A team of researchers with the Pohang University of Science and Technology in Korea has created organic nanowire synaptic transistors that emulate the working principles of biological synapses. As they describe in their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the artificial synapses they have created use much smaller amounts of power than other devices developed thus far and rival that of their biological counterparts.  
       
Scientists are taking multiple paths towards building next generation computers—some are fixated on finding a material to replace silicon, others are working towards building a quantum machine, while still others are busy trying to build something much more like the human mind. A hybrid system of sorts that has organic artificial parts meant to mimic those found in the brain. In this new effort, the team in Korea has reached a new milestone in creating an artificial synapse—one that has very nearly the same power requirements as those inside our skulls.

Up till now, artificial synapses have consumed far more power than human synapses, which researchers have calculated is on the order of 10 femtojoules each time a single one fires. The new synapse created by the team requires just 1.23 femtojoules per event—far lower than anything achieved thus far, and on par with their natural rival. Though it might seem the artificial creations are using less power, they do not perform the same functions just yet, so natural biology is still ahead. Plus there is the issue of transferring information from one neuron to another. The “wires” used by the human body are still much thinner than the metal kind still being used by scientists—still, researchers are gaining.

Source and further reading:
http://techxplore.com/news/2016-06-nanowire-synaptic-transistors-emulate-principles.html

Paper:
http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/2/6/e1501326

Image: Schematic of biological neuronal network and an ONW ST that emulates a biological synapse.

Credit: Science Advances (2016)

#nanotechnology   #artificialEPSC   #research  
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John Bump's profile photo
 
+Nikki Biefel might be interested in this.

Corina Marinescu

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Microbots can clean up polluted water
Swarms of graphene-coated nanobots could be our best hope yet of cleaning up the murky oceans, with scientists demonstrating that new microscopic underwater warriors can remove up to 95 percent of lead in wastewater in just 1 hour. 

By 2050, it's estimated that there will be more plastic than fish in the world's oceans, and waste metals such as lead, arsenic, mercury, cadmium, and chromium are affecting the delicate ecological balance that will make things very difficult for any animal that relies on it for food - including humans - in the near future.

Developed by an international team of researchers, the newly developed nanobots have three key components: a graphene oxide exterior to absorb lead (or another heavy metal); a nickel core that enables researchers to control the nanobots' movement via a magnetic field; and an inner platinum coating that functions as an engine and propels the bots forward via a chemical reaction with hydrogen peroxide.

Once they've made one pass, the nanobots - which are smaller than the width of a human hair - can be deployed again for further sweeps.

Article:
http://phys.org/news/2016-04-microbots-polluted.html
http://www.sciencealert.com/graphene-based-nanobots-could-clean-up-the-metal-from-our-oceans

Paper:
 http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b00768

#nanotech   #microbots   #graphene   #wastewatertreatment  
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Antenna Wilde's profile photo
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+Sam Collett Indeed, most of it comes from industrial facilities in Asia, and there is no incentives for them to stop. Cleaning the oceans after the fact is much harder than stopping the dumping in the first place. These developing countries need recycling technologies and economic incentives.

Corina Marinescu

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Quadrapeutics combines lasers, X-rays, gold nanoparticles, and chemo drugs to kill aggressive cancers.
 Researchers at Rice University have developed an approach that combines all four technologies to effectively kill aggressive cancer cells by literally exploding them. They dubbed the technology quadrapeutics, which significantly amplifies the killing effect of anti-cancer drugs and chemo, but only in cancer cells.

The technique harnesses plasmonic nanobubbles, tiny droplets of vapor that form around plasmonic gold nanoparticles, which can then pop and try to destroy the cell from within. If it doesn’t, the explosion causes the delivered drug to be spread through the cells and the effect of the chemotherapy also becomes more pronounced. The three modes of action combine to be effective even against aggressive tumors.

Paper:
http://www.nature.com/nm/journal/v20/n7/full/nm.3484.html

Article:
http://www.medgadget.com/2014/06/quadrapeutics-combines-lasers-x-rays-gold-nanoparticles-and-chemo-drugs-to-kill-aggressive-cancers.html

#cancer   #nanotechnology   #quadrapeutics   #research  
 
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gordon hoselton's profile photoRay Cromwell's profile photo
4 comments
 
^^^ Straight outta the New England Journal of Michelle Bachmann.

Corina Marinescu

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Bacteria, Graphene and Nanotech Produce Usable Electricity From Wastewater
Check out the kitchen timer counting down in the gif. There’s nothing special about it except for how it is being powered. The instrument isn’t equipped with batteries. In fact, its electricity comes from the vial behind it, where bacteria are eating organic matter in wastewater and producing electricity as a result. 

It’s the first time that researchers have produced enough electricity for practical use from what are called microbial fuel cells. Scientists in China reported their breakthrough late last week in the journal Science Advances. Their work could one day help provide the huge amounts of power needed to treat wastewater, a process that currently consumes up to 5 percent of all the electricity produced in the U.S.

Article:
http://txchnologist.com/post/133351599065/bacteria-graphene-and-nanotech-produce-usable

Paper:
http://www.researchgate.net/publication/283789140_Three-dimensional_graphenePt_nanoparticle_composites_as_freestanding_anode_for_enhancing_performance_of_microbial_fuel_cells

#nanotechnology #science   #research   #microbiology  
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Paul yates's profile photoAmanda Elliott's profile photo
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Thanksgiving 

Corina Marinescu

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From semiconductors to superbug killers
What are IBMers doing in nanomedicine anyway?
While exploring new ways to etch silicon wafers used in semiconductors, IBM researchers identified a new kind of polymer that produces an electrostatic charge when chained together.

IBM researchers realized if they could manipulate materials at the atomic level to control their movement and the electrostatic charge in a silicon wafer, they could translate those results to nanomedicine.

Ninja Polymers were born when IBM scientists partnered with the Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology in Singapore to explore ways to use these charged polymer structures in the ongoing fight against MRSA.

Watch:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=GtUFhBmuj2E

Know more:
http://www.research.ibm.com/articles/nanomedicine.shtml#fbid=r3choZtl74w

#nanotechnology   #medicine   #research   #MRSA   #HIV  
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Sam Collett's profile photoDrstrange Lane's profile photo
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DrstrangeLane@gmail.com
.

Corina Marinescu

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NASA Eyes First Carbon Nanotube Mirrors for CubeSat Telescope
Carbon nanotechnology may soon be making its way to space aboard a CubeSat in the form of a mirror made of a carbon nanotube resin. Developed by researchers at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, the mirror is designed to be used in a lightweight telescope that that will include spectrometers in the UV, visible, and near-IR wavelengths. So far, the 3 inch diameter mirrors are just prototypes, but their light weight, stability, and not needing to be polished could make them a relatively cheap alternatives to traditional mirrors.

Reference:
http://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2016/nasa-eyes-first-ever-carbon-nanotube-mirrors-for-cubesat-telescope

Article:
http://spectrum.ieee.org/nanoclast/aerospace/satellites/nasa-eyes-first-carbon-nanotube-mirrors-for-cubesat-telescope

Photo:
This laboratory breadboard is being used to test a conceptual telescope for use on CubeSat missions.
Credits: NASA/W. Hrybyk

#nanotech   #space   #nasa   #research   #cubesat   #carbonNanotubeMirror   #science  
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charly avital's profile photo
 
Très intéressant madame Cortina bonne soirée 
 ·  Translate

Corina Marinescu

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LSU researchers develop ‘holy grail’ eye drop to prevent, treat cataracts without surgery
LSU AgCenter scientists have formulated a nanoparticle matrix that could be used in eye drops to both prevent and treat cataracts, a leading cause of vision loss in older adults.

Professor Cristina Sabliov and assistant professor Carlos Astete in the AgCenter Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering have found a way to use nanoparticles to efficiently deliver hydrophobic lutein and enhance its stability and antioxidant properties so it can be used effectively in eye drops.

Lutein is a naturally occurring yellow pigment known as a carotenoid. It can be found in numerous plants, including yellow flowers and corn, as well as egg yolks and animal fats.

Lutein can also be found in the human eye. Studies have shown that dietary supplements can help replenish ocular lutein. But treatments using lutein have been limited in the past by the substance’s poor water solubility, its susceptibility to degradation and low absorption efficiency.

“The nanoparticle matrix can deliver lutein to the eye efficiently as an eye drop formulation,” Sabliov said. “Direct application of lutein to the eye in this formulation improves its effect against cataracts.”

Source & further reading:
http://www.lsuagcenter.com/profiles/rbogren/articles/page1461866942993

#research   #cataract   #nanoparticle  
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John Bump's profile photoIvan Kelly's profile photo
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Very interesting sweetie love your posts I enjoy them and always learn from them thank you my lovely friend

Corina Marinescu

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Teslaphoresis
Scientists from Rice University have developed a way to make carbon nanotubes self-assemble in a dish using a powerful Tesla coil transformer circuit.

Similar to graphene, carbon nanotubes are considered “supermaterials” with many potential applications but they have yet to be implemented on a wide scale. This new development will allow scientists to build circuits without actually touching them, marking a major step forward for potential uses of the material.

Watch:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w1d0Lg6wuvc

Paper:
http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acsnano.6b02313

Article:
http://techcrunch.com/2016/04/14/teslaphoresis-activated-self-assembling-carbon-nanotubes-look-even-cooler-than-they-sound/
http://motherboard.vice.com/read/watch-these-carbon-nanotubes-assemble-themselves?utm_source=mbfb

#nanotechnology   #research   #innovation  
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Keith Phillips's profile photoTarlac ShadowBlade's profile photo
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Excellent 

Corina Marinescu

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The Body Electric
The beating of our hearts, the rush of our blood and the myriad chemical reactions that keep us alive are all potential energy sources. Experts are working to develop technologies that take advantage of the powerful biological ecosystems we already carry around with us.

Engineers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Northwestern University teamed up with cardiologists at the University of Arizona to develop what they call piezoelectric nanoribbons, which attach to the outside of the heart muscle, much like a Band-Aid. These tiny strips contain crystals that create an electric current when flexed — each time the heart expands and contracts. In animal tests, electrical output reached 0.2 microwatts per square centimeter, potentially strong enough to power self-contained pacemakers and make battery-replacement surgeries a thing of the past.

Article:
https://www.newscientist.com/article/dn24906-bendy-implant-harnesses-the-power-of-your-beating-heart#.Ut8d-2Qo62w
http://www.medicaldaily.com/rechargeable-nanoribbon-harvests-electricity-organs-power-implanted-devices-video-267600

Image:
A thin strip with piezoelectric power generators can convert this cow heart's movements into electrical power to run pacemakers or other medical devices.

#nanotech   #nanoribbon   #heartstitch  
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Viorel Racoviteanu's profile photoJared Ribic's profile photo
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Not necessarily, +Viorel Racoviteanu .  Nothing's free, is true; as in there's no such thing as a perpetual motion machine.  But the energy that causes the heart muscles to contract comes from the food we eat.  The electrical impulses that trigger the heartbeat are very minute, so this system is entirely possible.