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This week Reactions makes first contact with the kerbalnauts! Through the fun of Kerbal Space Program, we examine the chemistry of rockets. Featuring Doane College Postdoctoral Fellow Raychelle Burks, Ph.D., we look at solid and liquid propellants and the “ride-able explosion” that is a rocket launch.

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The 2014 World Cup final is almost here, and no matter which two teams meet for the title match, there's one thing they'll both need to win: the ball. The "brazuca" is different from most other soccer balls out there, and our pals over at the Compound Interest blog dug in to find out why.

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Football is back, and with all the hard hits and tough tackles come renewed concerns about safety. Every NFL player is required to wear a helmet, but the helmets of today are a far cry from the leather creations from decades ago. To kick off this football season, Reactions looks at everything that goes into a football helmet and how chemistry helps keep players safe.

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Star Wars VII: The Force Awakens hits movie screens this week with its intense plot, edge-of-your-seat action scenes and, of course, lots of lightsabers. But is it actually possible to create a real-life lightsaber or build a functioning Death Star laser? To answer these questions and more, Reactions explores the science behind the Star Wars franchise.

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The Thing, Human Torch, Invisible Woman and Mister Fantastic are back this summer! In the new reboot, the team gets its powers while in an alternate dimension. Here at Reactions, though, we stick to comic book canon. In this week’s video, we explain the original way the Fantastic Four got their power – radiation – with help from SciPop Talks.

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It’s a big week for gamers now that the long-anticipated Fallout 4 video game is out. The series takes place in a world decades after nuclear war has destroyed most of civilization. Only those who hid in fallout shelters survived. While this idea works in a fictional game universe, could humans really survive for years or even decades in such a shelter? This week, Reactions looks at the basics of survival in a world riddled with radiation.

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Everybody knows that zombies love the smell of live humans. But if you smelled like a rotting corpse, they would probably pass on you for, shall we say, a "fresher" meal. With that mind, chemist and zombie film buff Raychelle Burks has come up with what could be a life-saving solution. Behold, the future of zombie apocalypse survival: Death Cologne!

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Check out this video of Raychelle talking poisons, medicine and communication science.

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Game of Thrones gave us a shock with the Purple Wedding and now everyone is asking: "Who poisoned King Joffrey?" While the search for the killer continues, the American Chemical Society's latest Reactions video focuses on what killed the hated king.

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If there’s one man in Hollywood that knows the value of chemistry, it’s Michael Bay. He’s taught society that in the face of a half-baked plot and thin script, big budget explosions can save your box office bacon. In our latest episode, we're going Hollywood and explaining the chemistry behind those spectacular big budget explosions.
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