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Meal Timing Crucial for Fat Loss: Is WHEN You Eat More Important for Losing Weight Than HOW MUCH You Eat?

Bottom line: While there's in my humble opinion need for follow-up studies measuring total lean and total fat mass, the study at hand does not just support the already established idea that "meal timing" matters. It rather - and that's the news - suggests that the effects of meal timing can override (at least in part) the benefits of caloric restriction. To put it simply: If we assume the results translate to human beings (obviously with the "normal feeding" period from 7/8am-7/8pm), starving yourself all day and starting to eat when you arrive at home after a full day's work may significantly impair your weight loss efforts - to a degree that may reduce a planned weight loss of one pound per week (w/ a 20% calorie deficit for someone on a 2500kcal diet) to ZERO - sorry!_
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How To Increase Sulforaphane in Broccoli Sprouts by ~3.5-fold

Soak your broccoli sprouts in 70 degrees C water for 10 minutes.
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Grind, Blend, Microwave - How Does the Way You Process Them Affect the Health-Benefits of Veggies and Fruits

Food processing ain't always bad(!) - if you could remember one take-home message, only, it should be just that: "Food processing ain't always bad!" While the study found no difference among the commercial blenders/grinders on the extractable levels of health-beneficial components including carotenoids, anthocyanins, free radical scavenging compounds and potential anti-inflammatory components, there is a general trend that favors the increase, not decrease, of such components in carrots (veggies) and blueberries (fruit) with blending and no effect in the probably most important anti-inflammatory effects (measured in the macrophage experiment the scientists did) with either blending/grinding or microwaving. So, if you buy frozen blueberries, defrost them in the microwave oven and blend them that's not worse than eating the 'fresh' blueberries from the farmers' market (you cannot tell me that the 'farmer' gathered them in the morning before he sells them). In fact, doing the former may have two important advantages: (a) the frozen blueberries may actually be "fresher" and more nutritious than the ones from the farmers' market (see Figure) so that the small drop in their health promoting effects matters only if supermarket stored the blueberries for years (Skupień. 2006)
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Starting to Have Breakfast is Worst New Year's Resolution ... Unless You Want to Gain Weight (80% Fat, 20% Lean Mass)

That's people like the forty-nine female nonhabitual breakfast-eaters who were randomized to one of two conditions: breakfast or no breakfast for 4 weeks. breakfast eaters ate at least 15% of their daily energy requirement before 8:30 a.m. non-breakfast eaters did not consume any energy until after 11:30 a.m. Weight and body fat were assessed at baseline and after four weeks of intervention. Body fat was measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Participants completed seven 24-hour recalls to assess dietary intake during the intervention. Physical activity was measured by accelerometry for 32 consecutive days. Figure 1: Participant flow diagram (LeCheminant. 2017). As you, as a SuppVersity reader, know the addition of breakfast did not magically resolve any of the medically irrelevant weight problems of the normal-weight pre-menopausal female subjects. On the opposite: On average, the participants randomized to eat breakfast consumed 266 ± 496 (F = 12.81; P < 0.01) more calories per day over the course of the study and weighed 0.7 ± 0.8 kg (F = 7.81; p < 0.01) more at the end of the intervention than their "intermittently fasting" peers.
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Gut's microbial community shown to influence host gene expression

New research is helping to tease out the mechanics of how the gut microbiome communicates with the cells of its host to switch genes on and off. The upshot of the study, another indictment of the so-called Western diet (high in saturated fats, sugar and red meat), reveals how the metabolites produced by the bacteria in the stomach chemically communicate with cells, including cells far beyond the colon, to dictate gene expression and health in its host.
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Probiotics improve cognition in Alzheimer's patients

For the first time, scientists have shown that probiotics -- beneficial live bacteria and yeasts taken as dietary supplements -- can improve cognitive function in humans. In a new clinical trial, scientists show that a daily dose of probiotic Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium bacteria taken over a period of just 12 weeks is enough to yield a moderate but significant improvement in the score of elderly Alzheimer's patients on the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scale, a standard measure of cognitive impairment.
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100% Increase in Exercise-Induced Collagen Synthesis With Cheap, Yet Effective 15g Gelatin + 200mg Vitamin C Stack

The deterioration of collagen is at the bottom of many musculoskeletal injuries. More than 50% of all injuries in sports can be classified as sprains, strains, ruptures, or breaks of musculoskeletal tissues. As the authors of a new paper in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition point out, there's hope that "[n]utritional and/or exercise interventions that increase collagen synthesis and strengthen these tissues could have an important effect on injury rates" (Shaw. 2016).
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Consuming high amounts of saturated fats linked to increased heart disease risk

Consuming high amounts of four major saturated fatty acids—found in red meat, dairy fat, butter, lard, and palm oil—may increase risk of coronary heart disease, according to a new study led by researchers at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Their findings also suggest that replacing these fats with healthier fats, whole grains, and plant proteins may reduce coronary heart disease risk.
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Aspartame may prevent, not promote, weight loss by blocking intestinal enzyme's activity

A team of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators has found a possible mechanism explaining why use of the sugar substitute aspartame might not promote weight loss. In their report published online in Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism, the researchers show how the aspartame breakdown product phenylalanine interferes with the action of an enzyme previously shown to prevent metabolic syndrome - a group of symptoms associated with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. They also showed that mice receiving aspartame in their drinking water gained more weight and developed other symptoms of metabolic syndrome than animals fed similar diets lacking aspartame.
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Whole-fat milk consumption associated with leaner children, research finds

Children who drink whole milk are leaner and have higher vitamin D levels than those who drink low-fat or skim milk, new research suggests. Children who drank whole (3.25 per cent fat content) milk had a Body Mass Index score that was 0.72 units lower than those who drank 1 or 2 per cent milk in the study published today in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. That's comparable to the difference between having a healthy weight and being overweight, said lead author Dr. Jonathon Maguire, a pediatrician at St. Michael's Hospital. The study did not assess why consuming higher fat content milk was associated with lower BMI scores. But Dr. Maguire hypothesized that children who drank whole milk felt fuller than those who drank the same amount of low-fat or skim milk. If children don't feel full from drinking milk, they are more likely to eat other foods that are less healthy or higher in calories, said Dr. Maguire. Therefore children who drink lower fat milk may actually consume more calories overall than those who drink whole milk. The study also found that children who drank one cup of whole milk each day had comparable vitamin D levels to those who drank nearly 3 cups of one per cent milk. This could be because vitamin D is fat soluble, meaning it dissolves in fat rather than water. Milk with higher fat content therefore contains more vitamin D. There may also be an inverse relationship in children between body fat and vitamin D stores, according to the study; as children's body fat increases, their vitamin D stores decrease.
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