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View From The Rundetaarn

The Rundetaarn, or the Round Tower in English, is a 17th century tower and one of Copenhagen's more popular tourist attractions. Easily accessible today, round and round you go as you walk up its spiral ramp to the top. Originally built as an astronomical observatory, today it's a great place to get a commanding view of the older part of Copenhagen.

In the distance, you can just make out the Øresund Bridge. Flying in/out of Copenhagen, you may notice this bridge seemingly connect the city of Copenhagen to a tiny island with virtually nothing on it. I admit I was perplexed when I saw this, as I couldn't understand why anyone would spend so much money to build a huge bridge to an island of nothing. As it turns out, it's actually the artificial island of Peberholm.

A number of interesting engineering and economic challenges were solved by placing an artificial island that connects the bridge to an underground tunnel, linking Copenhagen in Denmark with Malmo in Sweden. Everything from ship traffic to air traffic and freight train traffic had to balanced to come to the solution.

In the end, you get a bridge that looks like it goes to nowhere from the plane, but in reality provides a link between these two cities. The rest of the views, with its spires piercing the horizon is as beautiful as it is colorful.

Blogged: http://www.aisleseatplease.com/blog/2016/9/19/view-from-the-rundetaarn

#Rundetaarn #Copenhagen #Denmark #panorama #skyline #travel #landscape #photography #TheRoundTower #scenic #view #spire #europe #panoramic #københavn #travelphotography #landscapephotography #덴마크 #코펜하겐
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Frederiks Kirke

The first time I visited Copenhagen, I strolled past Frederik's Church, but didn't make it inside. This time, I managed to get there literally just 5 minutes before closing. Just enough time to quickly go in, take a few photos, and leave as the church was closing. Wish I had made it a bit earlier so I could've captured more of the beautiful dome above.

The dome itself is the largest church dome in Scandinavia with a 31m span, resting upon 12 columns. While the foundation stone was set by King Federick V on October 31st, 1749, the church did not reach completion until 1894 due to budget cuts and other impediments.

Located just west of Amalienborg Palace, the church is in easy walking distance of several historical sights in Copenhagen. The Kastellet citadel with its neighboring Little Mermaid statue is a 10-15 minute walk north, while Rosenborg Castle and the King's Garden are a 10minute walk west. With a little planning, you can easily see much of the historical highlights of Copenhagen in a day.

Blogged: http://www.aisleseatplease.com/blog/2016/8/8/frederiks-kirke

#FrederiksKirke #FrederiksChurch #TheMarbleChurch #Marmorkirken #copenhagen #church #travel #photogrpahy #denmark #europe #danish #cross #ChurchOfDenmark #DanishNationalChurch #lutheran #christianity #spiritual #religion #rococo #architecture #københavn #zealand #travelphotography #덴마크
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Roskilde Cathedral

This UNESCO World Heritage Site is the burial place for numerous Danish monarchs since the 15th century. Constructed during the 12th and 13th centuries, it is the first Gothic cathedral built of brick and encouraged the spread of its Brick Gothic style throughout Northern Europe.

Located just 25 mins outside of Copenhagen by train, the cathedral is easily accessible on foot from the train station. I was severely under the weather when I visited, and it took all my strength and determination to leave my hibernation-like state from the hotel to make my way here. There's probably a few other sites to see in the area, but this is the main one.

If your time in Copenhagen is limited, I would recommend you spend the time to visit Kronborg castle first. Unfortunately the train lines don't exactly overlap for seeing these two sites, but there's plenty of other things to see when walking around Copenhagen.
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Rosenborg Castle

Originally built as a country house in 1606, it was expanded several times to its current condition in 1624. The Danish regents used it as a royal residence until 1710.

I haven't seen too many castles, but as far as castles go, this one seemed to be on the smaller side. Or at least, that's how it felt to me. However, it is surrounded by a beautiful garden which is more of a park and a nice reprieve from the mad bikers of Copenhagen.
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The Defense Of Kronborg Castle

Since I generally don't travel to Europe compared to other parts of the world, I haven't been to many castles. Europe really seems to be a stronghold of castles. Still, when in Rome... or in this case, when in Denmark, might as well check out a castle, and few can be as culturally famous as that of Kronborg, the setting for William Shakespeare's 'Hamlet.'

While I had intended to try to merely watch an adaption of Hamlet, knowing that reading the play was unrealistic for me, I failed to get around to seeing it before my visit. A fairly popular tourist site, even on a rainy day with storm clouds above, the setting by the Øresund makes for some beautiful scenery along with that feeling of history.
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Our Fallen

Designed by Svend Lindhard, "Vore Faldne" (Our Fallen) is a bronze Memorial to the fallen Danes in the Allied Forces of World War II. The monument is located just outside the main entrance to the Kastellet, a Danish citadel.

I didn't have much time in Copenhagen and was taking a brisk walk around town. As it was a Tuesday morning, the grounds were relatively quiet, and I only even noticed one or two other tourists. If you're visiting Denmark, it's worth noting that lots of tourist sites - Museums, Cathedrals - are closed on Mondays, so plan accordingly.
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The Path Out Of Elsinore

At the edge of Hamlet's Castle, where the fortification meets Øresund (the Sound), is a well trafficked waterway. The strait of water separating the island of Zealand, where the castle is located, from Sweden at this point is just 2.5 miles (4km) wide.

Walking around the grounds, the sky was a bit broody and contemplative, but thankfully remained largely cooperative. Whenever I find myself in a location of such history, I like to imagine what it must have been like at the height of it's glory - teeming with people of all sorts, horses and wagons coming and going, fully suited up soldiers in armor. Good thing is, when all else fails, I can just take it easy on my brain and leave it to the movies.

Blogged: http://www.aisleseatplease.com/blog/2014/7/1/the-path-out-of-elsinore
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The Knight's Path

Created in 1606 when King Christian IV acquired the land for building Rosenborg Castle, this urban park sees over 2.5 million visitors a year. Kavalergangen (Knight's Path) is lined with lime trees, and can trace its history back to 1649.

Read the rest of this entry at: http://www.aisleseatplease.com/blog/2015/4/2/the-knights-path

#HDR #copenhagen #denmark #canon #travel #kavalergangen #knightspath #knight #day #rosenborgcastlegarden #rosenborg #garden #park #urban #grass #trees #path #lime #tilia #basswood #linden #landscape #travelphotography #덴마크
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Hamlet's Castle

Kronborg is perhaps best known as the setting for William Shakespeare's play, Hamlet. Its history dates back to the 1420s when it was built by King Eric VII as one of two strongholds on opposing coasts of the Øresund, used to control the entrance to the Baltic Sea.

Read more at: http://www.aisleseatplease.com/blog/2014/9/29/hamlets-castle

#kronborg #hamlet #canon #hdr #travel #elsinore #denmark #덴마크#cannon #unesco #unescoworldheritagesite #travelphotography #danish #castle
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The winter home of the Danish royal family consists of four identical classicizing palace façades. In the center of the courtyard is a statue of King Federick V, Amalienborg's founder. This is pretty much in line with what I would expect the royal old world to look like.For those who savor in the historical charms of Europe, you can delight in the fact that these palaces were built in the mid 1700s. Various Danish royalty have lived in the palaces, along with other government institutions being housed there, such as the Supreme Court and Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
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