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Rumors of Death may be Exaggerated

Our old clock was dead. Until it wasn’t. Sometimes even when it’s over it still isn’t over.

Click here to watch my short video:
https://www.facebook.com/100001290602382/videos/1387440391308968/
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Looking up Through the Branches

It seemed like such a good idea at the time.

I took one look at the picture in the do-it-yourself book my wife brought home from the library and immediately fell in love.

Doesn’t every kid want a tree house?  I certainly did.  However, we had no suitable trees in our yard, so the idea was a non-starter.

But now it was different.

Click to find out what happened next:
https://yonasongoldson.com/about/essays/looking-up-through-the-branches/
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If All the Seas were Diamonds

It’s not raining money, but it might be raining diamonds.

Not here on earth, of course. For that you’ll have to go to the planet Neptune. At least, that’s what scientists are now telling us.

So let’s talk about the practical applications of mass diamond production.

https://yonasongoldson.com/2017/08/30/if-all-the-seas-were-diamonds/
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Conquer Laziness by Starting Small

Readers of a certain age may remember an old Goodyear tire commercial with the tag line, “You can pay me now, or pay me later.”

The applications go way beyond auto repair. That’s what Shaomin Li, professor of international business at Virginia’s Old Dominion University, discovered on a business trip to Taiwan.

As he was being chauffeured from one venue to the next, Professor Li noticed that his host always backed into parking lot spaces, opting for often tricky and laborious maneuvering over the simpler method of pulling in straight forward.

Detecting a wider pattern of behavior, Professor Li conducted his own experiment. He discovered that 88% of Chinese drivers back in when they park, in contrast to 6% of American drivers.

“All of a sudden,” recounts Professor Li, “I said, gee – isn’t this delayed gratification?”

We shouldn’t jump to conclusions based on a single study, but this observation does not appear in a vacuum. In his book Outliers, Malcolm Gladwell investigates the popular stereotype that transplanted Asians excel academically and professionally compared with homegrown Americans.

Mr. Gladwell discovered that the stereotype is much more accurate among southern Chinese than among northern Chinese, and he identifies a single reason for the difference:

Rice paddies.

Click to read the whole article:
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/conquer-laziness-starting-small-yonason-goldson
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The Price of Uncertainty

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8 Questions for Making Better Choices

I’m a big fan of Malcolm Gladwell. His particular genius for collecting data and weaving together fresh insights has produced a wealth of practical wisdom to help us improve the quality of our lives.

But nobody’s perfect.

I disqualified Mr. Gladwell for sainthood after coming across his 2004 Ted Talk, in which he recounted the career of one Howard Moskowitz, a psychophysicist whose market research for Pepsi Cola, Vlasic Pickles, and Prego Spaghetti Sauce -- beginning back in the early 70s -- changed the food industry forever. It might seem obvious to us with the wisdom of hindsight but, to make a long story short, Howard Moskowitz discovered that there is no perfect pickle, no ideal type of cola, and no universal favorite recipe for spaghetti sauce.

As a result, we've ended up with:

7 different kinds of vinegar
14 different types of mustard
36 varieties of Ragu spaghetti sauce
71 variations of olive oil. 
And as options increase, prices go up.  But Mr. Gladwell tells us it’s all worth it:

That is the final, and I think most beautiful lesson, of Howard Moskowitz: that in embracing the diversity of human beings, we will find a surer way to true happiness.

And it is here that Malcolm Gladwell exits the highway of reason by turning off onto the backstreets of phantasmagoria.

Click to read the rest:
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/8-questions-making-better-choices-yonason-goldson
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Why we fall short
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Find your Focus-Factor

Many years ago, when my eldest son was about six years old, I introduced him to Chutes and Ladders, the next board game up from Candyland on the sophistication scale. Nothing but luck, the game nevertheless contains an engaging element of the unpredictable, as any roll of the die can rocket you up a ladder to the top or send you plummeting down a slide to the bottom.

My son took to the game immediately, and we bonded while moving our respective pieces up and down the board. And then, with fatherly foresight, I waited for the moment of supreme joy and excitement as my son counted his piece onto the 100 mark at the top of the playing grid.

“You won!” I cried out, expecting him to respond with elation.

Instead, my son looked at the board, looked at me, and burst into tears.

“What’s wrong?” I exclaimed, genuinely flummoxed.

“I don’t want the game to be over!” he bawled.

Oh, if only they could stay six years old forever.

It’s worth examining what happens as we grow older that makes us lose the joy of the game in our headlong pursuit of victory. Maybe it’s that we’re not paying attention. Maybe it’s that we’re paying too much attention.

Or maybe it’s both.

Click to read the rest:
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/find-your-focus-factor-yonason-goldson
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