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A pretty awesome illustration of the conflict at Plataea between the Persian army and a coalition of Greek city-states led by the Spartans. This battle which was fought in 479 BC has been overshadowed by the last stand of Thermopylae (480 BC) which was fought a year earlier. However, it was at Plataea where the hopes for Xerxes the Great conquering Greece ended.

Artist: Milek Jakubiec

#MilitaryHistory #Warfare #Greece
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The English historian, John Stuart Mill wrote: “The Battle of Marathon, even as an event in British history, is more important than the Battle of Hastings.”

The conflict at Marathon (490 BC) happened ten years prior to the Battle of Thermopylae. Nevertheless, do you think that Mill's statement is exaggerated, or not?

The fantastic illustration was created by the incomparable, Peter Connolly.

#Classics #MilitaryHistory #Warfare
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A solemn tribute for the heroic defenders of Salamis (Σαλαμινομάχοι), who fought during the seminal battle in Sept 480 BC.

A month earlier the Persian army had defeated the Greeks at Thermopylae (August), therefore, this was an extremely important naval battle that changed the momentum of the war and for this reason it is considered the turning point of the second invasion of Greece by Persia.

#MilitaryHistory #Warfare #Classics
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According to historian, Nick Sekunda, "If the Persian Wars were the most glorious period in Spartan history, then the battle of Thermopylae was surely Sparta's finest hour".

Now there are readers who might disagree and say, "How can a defeat be Sparta's finest hour?" Well then, for the sake of discussion, what would you consider Sparta's greatest moment?

The fantastic illustration is by Richard Hook.

#MilitaryHistory #Warfare #Greece
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An extremely rare black and white publicity photo from the more accurate version of the Battle of Thermopylae entitled, "The 300 Spartans".

It was in this scene that King Leonidas was killed on the third and final day....after his death the remaining Spartans (and Thespians) died under the hail of arrows that were so numerous, "they blot out the sun".

Image (c) 20th Century Fox- 1962

#MilitaryHistory #Warfare
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An awesome illustration the Spartan led defense of the Pass of Thermopylae which was fought in August, 480 BC.

Here's is something to think about, had Xerxes the Great not be told of the goat track which allowed the Persians to surround the Greek position, do you think that King Leonidas and the 300 Spartans along with the rest of the Hellenes would have emerged victorious?

Artist: Petri Hiltunen

#MilitaryHistory #Warfare #Greece
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A set of magnificent sculptures depicting the Spartans fighting the elite warriors of the Persian army, the Immortals.

These works of art are part of "The Garden of Heroes and Villains" collection, of which those of the Battle of Thermopylae were created by master sculptor, Mike Rizello.

Attribution: jacquemart

#MilitaryHistory #Warfare #Classics
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A phenomenal painting of the Battle of Thermopylae (480 BC) by artist, Chris Collingwood entitled, "The Hot Gates".

While the movie, "300" focuses on the defense at Thermopylae by the Spartans led by King Leonidas (Gerard Butler), there were 6,700+ other Greeks who fought during the three-day conflict.

I have combined the posts relative to the Battles of Marathon, Salamis, Plataea so that they will now appear within this collection since they are all conflicts relative to the landmark battles of the Graeco-Persian Wars (490-479 BC).

#MilitaryHistory #Warfare #History
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An image of the Greek movie poster for the Warner Bros.' film, "300".

This advertisement will be understood by individuals who are of Greek heritage, however, once translated it will resonate with those who are also intrigued by the Spartan (Σπαρτιάτες) defense at the Pass of Thermopylae in 480 BC (Μάχη τῶν Θερμοπυλῶν).

The two words which are superimposed above the title 300 read ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ, which translated means, "Come and Take Them" or "Come and Get Them". It is an iconic phrase which was spoken by King Leonidas (Λεωνίδας) 2500 years ago and is still a symbol of defiance today.

#Greece #MilitaryHistory #Warfare
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In honor of #LionDay which occurred last week, the tribute to the most revered of the Spartan kings, Leonidas, the 'Lion of Sparta' who defended Thermopylae in 480 BC with 300 Spartans and 6700 other Greeks.

#MilitaryHistory #Warfare
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