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An entrance at Queensferry, Scotland

The theme today is "sailboats" and although I have lots of pictures of actual ships and yachts in and out of the water, I prefer to share with you this interior shot with a little model boat and the Forth Bridge in the background. I think it captures the reassuring warmth of staying on land as well as the constant temptation of going out to sea. #joinindaily
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Simple is sometimes beautiful...
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Just after sunset from the top of Milos island, Greece.

My mum's family was from Milos and I spent long summers there, because of long school holidays and my dad's seasonal job as a civil engineer. I remember Milos as much more rustic than it is now, when it's trying to compete with Mykonos or Santorini as an upmarket destination. This view is from the hill over the old town of Plaka, showing the peninsula of Vani on the left and the island or Erimomilos (Deserted Milos) in the distance.
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There's a monster in my house!

These amazing masks were made by a theatre costume maker in St Petersburg in the late 90s. I bought this one from the Dom Gallery of my friend Maria Rud, in Edinburgh's old town. Dom was in Advocate's Close opposite St. Giles and brought together original arts and crafts from Scotland, Russia, and Scandinavia, as well as wonderful people. Sadly it didn't last. Eventually the Close (side street) was redeveloped with a more lucrative bar and hotel. 
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A freight train is crossing over a bridge in the twilight. It goes on and on... and that is the theme for today's #joinindaily

That was only a few days ago. The moon did not oblige for this picture, but someone thoughtfully placed this orange buoy. It'll have to do.
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Williamsburg, Brooklyn, 2011. A boy plays around a busted fire hydrant.

My 2nd trip to New York I think. I got to New York late, after Giuliani forcibly gentrified much of the city. Perhaps in the late 80s or early 90s it would have been more... interesting. Even so I found New York to be much as we've come to expect from American movies, songs, and TV. By contrast Tokyo or London are not like their stereotypes, and you probably have no image of Berlin in your mind until you go there. Perhaps New York is more honest, or just better at exporting its culture. Or maybe Rudy never got to Williamsburg.

The theme today for #joinindaily is "Splashes". 
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Lighthouse at Crinan Lock

This dinky little lighthouse is at Crinan, a secret place in Scotland. Well it was a secret until I told everybody. Now I messed it up. Crinan is at one end of the Crinan Canal, which lets boats traverse the Mull of Kintyre peninsula and get out to the Hebrides quicker and with less exposure to the open sea. The canal was built initially for transport, and is now used by pleasure boats and antique steamers. At Crinan there's a tiny settlement, a hotel, a boat yard, and the sea lock that lets boats enter and exit the canal.

#joinindaily "lighthouses"
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金沢市の兼六園
From the Kenroku-en garden in Kanazawa, a city on the north coast of Japan. That was in 2015. According to the kanji, Kanazawa means "Gold marsh town" and the city has a tradition of gold-leaf artistry. If you don't fancy a gold decorated ceramic bowl or lacquer tray, you can buy a cone of white ice cream with gold-leaf sprinkles for about $15. Yes it has gold on it, and you eat it.

#joinindaily "looks peaceful"
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The light in Cadiz, Spain, 2017

Cadiz is an amazing place, a city of the sea. Surrounded by the Atlantic on three sides, it has a huge shipyard and a port. It's the base from which Spain invaded, butchered, and ruled South America during the colonial years. You can see the money that flowed through this city even if today it's poor. It may not have Venice's canals or the self-assured civic beauty of Marseille but, like them, the entire city is defined by its history as a dominant seaport of its time.
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Victorian audacity

The Forth Bridge links Edinburgh with the north of Scotland over the estuary of the river Forth. Rather than build a modest bridge standing on several piers near the waterline, the Victorians built this massive cantilever structure that's high enough for sailing ships (and today's cruise ships) to pass underneath. The steam train goes straight across the span without changing level.
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