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Great 10' on setting meaningful goals and properly scheduling your day to reduce #procrastination
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“I’d never heard it said that way, but it stuck with me. So much so that I’ve said it to my kid now: ‘Is that a dream, or a goal? Because a dream is something you fantasize about that will probably never happen. A goal is something you set a plan for, work toward, and achieve. I always looked at my stuff that way.“

From “Tools of Titans: The Tactics, Routines, and Habits of Billionaires, Icons, and World-Class Performers”
by Timothy Ferriss
http://markg.photo/340-365-is-that-a-dream/
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Everyone is fighting a battle you know nothing about.

From “Tools of Titans: The Tactics, Routines, and Habits of Billionaires, Icons, and World-Class Performers”
by Timothy Ferriss
http://markg.photo/339-365-you-know-nothing/
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On why your free time (be it one year or one day) should be structured in some way.

>> My first sabbatical was initially disastrous. I had thought I could do it without a plan, as if the vacuum of time would miraculously generate ideas. It did not. Without a plan, I reacted to little requests, essentially becoming my own intern. But then I made a list of the things I was interested in, put them in a hierarchy, divided them into chunks of time and made a plan, very much like in grade school. The structure allowed me to get really close to design again. I had fun. Basically everything we did in the seven years following that first sabbatical came out of thinking from that one single year.<<

Read on:
Stefan Sagmeister: Take One Year Off In Every Seven - UNLIMITED by UBS http://ow.ly/GrIV30hPlam
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A decision has not been made until people know:
– the name of the person accountable for carrying it out;
– the deadline;
– the names of the people who will be affected by the decision and therefore have to know about, understand, and approve it—or at least not be strongly opposed to it; and
– the names of the people who have to be informed of the decision, even if they are not directly affected by it.

From “The Effective Executive: The Definitive Guide to Getting the Right Things Done”
by Peter F. Drucker
https://markg.li/2BB4fcp
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They asked, “What needs to be done?”
They asked, “What is right for the enterprise?”
They developed action plans.
They took responsibility for decisions.
They took responsibility for communicating.
They were focused on opportunities rather than problems.
They ran productive meetings.
They thought and said “we” rather than “I.”

From “The Effective Executive: The Definitive Guide to Getting the Right Things Done”
by Peter F. Drucker

https://markg.li/2BBojvB
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Great 2-hour interview of Maria Sharapova, one of the best tennis players in the world on tactics of training, mental performance, mental toughness, and much more.

Listen on the Tim Ferriss podcast. #261: Mental Performance, Work-Life Balance, and the Rise to the Top - Maria Sharapova
http://ow.ly/Yxhu30hL2C0
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I have not come across a single “natural”: an executive who was born effective. All the effective ones have had to learn to be effective. And all of them then had to practice effectiveness until it became habit.

From “The Effective Executive: The Definitive Guide to Getting the Right Things Done”
by Peter F. Drucker
https://markg.li/2AmOwk3
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Good executives focus on opportunities rather than problems. Problems have to be taken care of, of course; they must not be swept under the rug. But problem solving, however necessary, does not produce results. It prevents damage. Exploiting opportunities produces results. [..] Effective executives put their best people on opportunities rather than on problems.

From “The Effective Executive: The Definitive Guide to Getting the Right Things Done”
by Peter F. Drucker
https://markg.li/2Ah3Uyh
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Effective executives know this and check up (six to nine months later) on the results of their people decisions. If they find that a decision has not had the desired results, they don’t conclude that the person has not performed. They conclude, instead, that they themselves made a mistake. In a well-managed enterprise, it is understood that people who fail in a new job, especially after a promotion, may not be the ones to blame.

From “The Effective Executive: The Definitive Guide to Getting the Right Things Done”
by Peter F. Drucker
https://markg.li/2AlTIT6
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