Post has attachment
The house was built in 2003 with the help of over 100 volunteers, 80% of them women with no previous construction experience.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
In the mid-12th century the Normans built a castle here on the site of a Roman Villa abandoned in the 5th century. By the mid-14th century the stones of the castle were used to build the village.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
This cottage, with its roundwood pillars, was designed by the architect John Nash. Sadly, when this home was built, there used to be a hamlet of cottages nearby, but the overly rich owners had them removed because they spoilt the view.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
This is the cordwood roundhouse at Denmark Farm in Wales, sitting in their 40 acre nature reserve. The roundhouse was built in 2008 by Tony Wrench leading a collection of over 60 volunteers.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Bayleaf Farm, with its oak wattle and daub home, has a kitchen garden based on writings from the 14th to 16th centuries. Watch the video for a lesson in permaculture from 500 years ago [VIDEO].
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Jay builds tiny dens, hobbit homes and outdoor classrooms. This one is one of a pair for a school in Norwich, England [VIDEO].
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
About 20 years ago this was the site of an ugly landfill. After a clay cap and some topsoil this straw bale classroom was built to teach kids about protecting the environment.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment

This is the Forest Ark at Hazel Hill wood, a beautiful secluded 70 acre (28 ha) wood and sustainable education centre near Salisbury in England.  The building is fully off-grid with a composting loo and rainwater harvested from the shingled roof.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
This cute playhouse was built with roundwood oak that most builders would have rejected but actually in the hands of a natural builder makes for one of the most desirable little buildings you could ever hope for.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
New or old, natural homes are full of charm. This 1750 cottage is built using clay, marsh grass, horse hair, salvaged oak, turf, gorse and wheat straw. A new cottage built today with the same materials would have just the same appeal.
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded