Post has attachment
The Land of Dixies

Several theories have been proposed for the origin of the South’s nickname, Dixie. Three are the most popular. One suggest that name was derived from the surveyor Jeremiah Dixon of the famed Mason-Dixon Line. Another suggest a Manhattan slave owner called "Mr. Dixy” whose property may have been called “Dixy’s land”. What may be the the most compelling explanation though is the ten dollar banknotes that were issued in New Orleans, especially those issued by Citizens Bank of Louisiana. Dix is French for ten. In the mid 1800's New Orleans was a wealthy international port with strong well funded banks. The Dix notes or as they were called Dixies traded hands all along the Mississippi River and they were probably the preferred method of payment for many.

#Exonumia    
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
I recently acquired this Saxon Hammered Silver Coin / Silver Penny for one of my friends. It dates from Æthelred II’s first reign 978–1013 AD. Æthelred II was King of the English twice at the end of the first millennium and the beginning of the second. He has become know as Æthelred the unready, but that is a mistranslation of the Old English word unræd which means bad-counsel. A better translation might be Æthelred the ill advised. The coin can be dated even more precisely to 991-997 AD because it is also marked with the mint and mint maker’s (moneyer) name Eadmund of Norwich.

During the reign of Æthelred II a number of 'emergency' mints were set up because of attacks and plundering by the Vikings.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Maria Teresa Thaler

'Thaler' is an abbreviation of  'Joachimsthaler', type of coin from the city of Joachimsthal (Jáchymov) in Bohemia, where some of the first such coins were minted in 1518. (Tal is German for 'valley'. A 'thaler' is a person or a thing 'from the valley'.

The Maria Theresa Thaler is named for the Empress Maria Theresa, who ruled Austria, Hungary, and Bohemia from 1740 to 1780. The word 'thaler' gave rise to 'daalder' and 'daler', which became 'dollar' in English. The coin was well received when first minted in 1741 and it quickly became a standard trade coin. After 1780 the coin has always been struck with the same date, 1780. Because of the trade demand, several nations eventually began striking Maria Theresa Thalers. The following mints are know to have made them, Birmingham, Bombay, Brussels, London, Paris, Rome and Utrecht, in addition to the Habsburg mints in Günzburg, Hall, Karlsburg, Kremnica, Milan, Prague and Vienna. Between 1751 and 2000, some 389 million were minted. As you can imagine, this leads to some confusion about where and when any particular coin was made.

Below is a Thaler that I found in my Dad's collection. It was packaged in a coin holder that claimed it was "Original Strike". After doing a little research, the small "S.F." on the face  leads me to believe that it was minted in Guenzburg between 1781-1788, but who knows. I found another much newer / cleaner Thaler in Dad's collection which I will also add to the album. It also has the "S.F."

http://www.theresia.name/en/index.html
http://www.theresia.name/cgi-bin/Token.cgi?Page=6
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maria_Theresa_thaler

#MariaTeresaThaler  
#MTT  
#Thaler  
#Daalder
#Daler  
Photo
Photo
Maria Theresa Thaler
2 Photos - View album
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
George III, Penny (Twopence), Dated 1797

Here in the United States we remember George III as the King of England during the our Revolutionary War and the War of 1812. 

The George III Twopence shown below is also known as a Cartwheel Penny. It was struck in 1797 on Soho Mint’s new steam powered press in Birmingham. The press could turn out 70 to 84 coins per minute. The copper coin feels almost ridiculously large and heavy. It is 1 10/16 inches diameter, almost a quarter inch thick, and weighs two ounces.

See the history of the British Penny:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_British_penny_(1714-1901)

#CartwheelPenny
#BritishPenny
#GeorgeIII   
Photo
Photo
George III Penny, dated 1797
2 Photos - View album
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Wreck-site Silver  Ducaton, Dated 1647

In 1711 a Dutch East India Company ship named De Liefde (The Love) sank near Mio Ness on the southern tip of the Out Skerries in the Shetland Islands. The ship was outbound and carried a large quantity of gold and silver coins. Of the 300 people aboard only one survived. In the mid 1960s, divers located the wreck site and began recovering coins. Most were silver ducatons (thaler, daalder), minted in the Low Countries during the second half of the 17th or early 18th century. In this case the coin was minited in the Duchy of Brabant.  The Low Countries are a coastal region in north western Europe which today consist mainly of Belgium and the Netherlands with parts of northern Germany and France.

The face of silver ducaton shown below has a portrait of Philip IV of Spain and it is dated 1647. The reverse shows Philip’s coat of arms between two lions. The symbols in the coat of arms show the reach of the Spanish court in the mid 17th century.  Wikipedia has a page that can help decode the visible ones. At the time Philip’s coat contained the royal crest of Aragon, Castile, Granada, Naples & Sicily, Austria, Bourbon, Old and New Burgundy, Flanders, Tirol, and Brabant. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coat_of_arms_of_Spain

For more information and photo of artifacts from the wreck-site, please see these links:

http://canmore.rcahms.gov.uk/en/site/102891/details/de+liefde+mio+ness+housay+out+skerries+north+sea/

http://photos.shetland-museum.org.uk/index.php?a=QuickSearch&q=Liefde&WINID=1460311032742

#DeLiefde
#Ducaton  
#Thaler
#Daalder
#Brabant
Photo
Photo
Wreck-site Silver Ducaton, Dated 1647
2 Photos - View album
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Pirate Money?

This set of Spanish Colonial coins includes an 8 Real, which is also known as a “Piece of Eight”, and each of its fractional parts, the 4, 2, 1, and ½ Reales. The ½ Real is also known as a Picayune. I think the title “Pirate Money” is a little misleading. All of these coins are dated after what is generally agreed to be the Golden Age of Piracy, the 1650s to the 1730s.    

The obverse of the 1 Real feature the bust and legend of Carolus III (AKA Charles III), and it is dated 1781. On the reverse, the mintmark is a monogram containing “PTS”, and the  inspection marks are “P” and “R”.  This tells us that the coin was struck in Potosi, Bolivia, and inspected by Pedro Narciso de Mazondo and Raimundo de Iturriaga. 

The obverse of all the other coins feature the bust and legend of Carolus IIII (AKA Charles IV), and they are all dated 1791. The reverse shows that some of the coins were struck in Guatemala “NG” and some in Mexico, "M" with a small "o" above it. 

The Practical Book of Cobs by Daniel Sedwick, is an excellent guide to Spanish Colonial coins.

#SpanishColonialCoins
#SpanishColonial
Photo
Photo
Pirate Money
2 Photos - View album
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Peace Dollar Money Clip, 1922

James Kirby invented the "vacuette" circa 1920. This money clip may have been given as an incentive to one of Kirby's early vacuum cleaner salesmen. It is marked "Kirby Opportunity Club".

Peace Dollars were the last silver dollar coin that was intended for circulation. They were first minted in 1921. The design memorialized the peace following World War I.

The Peace Dollar is 90% silver, and 10% copper. It is 1 ½ inches in diameter and weighs 26.73 grams. The clip is made of sterling silver, 92.5% silver and 7.5% copper. The overall dimensions are 2 ½ by 1 ¾ by 5/16  inches and the overall weight is 48 grams.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kirby_Company , and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peace_dollar

#Exonumia
Photo
Photo
Peace Dollar Money Clip, 1922
2 Photos - View album
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
8 Escudos Gold Cob from the 1715 Fleet

On July 30 1715, A large fleet of Spanish galleons encountered a hurricane off the Florida coast near Sebastian inlet. An almost unimaginable treasure and more than a thousand lives were lost in the storm.

Looking closely at the left-hand side of the shield you can see the bottom of an M above a J. An O over an M is the mint mark for Mexico and the J is the assayers mark. On the right side of the shield you can see the full denomination mark VIII.

This appears to be a Die 9 coin which was probably struck 1714. There were 5 different Die Varieties used by Spain's Mexico Mint in 1714 and I need to do some more research.

111-0294
#1715Fleet  
#8Escudo  
Photo
Photo
1715 Fleet, 8 Escudos (2 photos)
2 Photos - View album
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded