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Why Scientists Need To Start Managing Data Better? Over the last two decades, many lab instruments have become vastly more sophisticated and affordable, and as a result, many more labs are now generating data at unprecedented rates.

CEO of Nebulab Guillermo Vela explained that even the best funded institutions will be unable to grow their IT infrastructures to meet modern research demands.

http://gsbs.uthscsa.edu/blog/why-scientists-need-to-start-managing-data-better
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March is #ColonCancerMonth. Here are 5 quick facts that you should know. #getscreened http://tiny.cc/ccmb

1) Bad news: #coloncancer (#CRC) is estimated to be the third most commonly diagnosed and cause of cancer death in the U.S. for both men and women this year. That’s one in 20 folks will be diagnosed in their lifetime.

2) There are multiple factors that determine your risk of getting colon cancer such as genetics, the types of food you eat, physical activity, and tobacco and alcohol consumption

3) It’s not just an old person disease, young people are susceptible it too. Studies have shown that rates of colon cancer for the young population (under 50) have risen.

4) Good news: Colon cancer incidence rates have dropped 30 percent for the last 10 years in the US due to increased screening practices for the disease. If detected early, survival rates are relatively high. In fact, an estimated 60 percent of deaths from colon cancer can be avoided if caught early.

5) There are more than one million colon cancer survivors in the U.S.

- See more at: http://gsbs.uthscsa.edu/blog/march-is-colon-cancer-month#sthash.Mrd79V3d.dpuf
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Ann Salamone, president of Rochal Industries and Career Advisory Council member, has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering for her development of materials for biomedical applications, personal care, electronics, and water purification.
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Is plagiarism a problem for scientists? Dr. Nicquet Blake, Dr. Ratna Vadlamudi, and Dr. Rong Li answer questions about what to do when your mentor’s resume looks too similar to yours or if you would like to build upon someone else’s work.

Dr. McManus explained that there have been cases of students that had F-grants that looked too similar to their mentors.

“It doesn’t look good for you to plagiarize at this stage, even if you have a similar path as your mentor, you should be able to stand out as a scientist on your own,” Dr. McManus said.

http://gsbs.uthscsa.edu/blog/plagiarism-ownership-and-misconduct-in-science
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Is there a right or wrong answer when it comes to #researchethics

Dr. Andrea Giuffrida explains that as the vice president of research at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, one of his tasks is to encourage scientists to think about the ethical implications of their research in society. 

http://gsbs.uthscsa.edu/blog/spotlight-on-research-integrity-science-society-bioethical-dilemmas

+NIH Grants (Office of Extramural Research) +ResearchGate 
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Is there bias in scientific peer review? Dr. Linda McManus spoke as part of a panel with Dr. Phil LoVerde. Dr. Teresa Evans, and Dr. Alan Frazer on Tuesday to address the responsibilities of peer reviewers in light of the recent Fiona Ingleby controversy. 

“We are human beings. So, is there bias towards well-known investigators? Yes, absolutely,” said Dr. Frazer. “However, I’ve never seen a junior researcher’s manuscript be rejected for being from an unknown or lesser known lab.” - See more at: http://gsbs.uthscsa.edu/blog/is-there-bias-in-scientific-peer-review#sthash.v4RenJyw.dpuf
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