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It is mind boggling to think of the amount of Galaxies and Solar Systems in the Ultra Deep Field by Hubble ST, but isn't it even more mind boggling to consider that there is no other life out there in Space, from one image we peer at Millions of Galaxies each harboring Billions of Solar Systems and unimaginable amounts of Planets, it is crazy to think we are not alone in the Universe but it is even more Crazy to consider that we are!
https://youtu.be/hritwrFJbTo
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The construction technique is a mystery, the builders are unknown, yet the artistic brilliance found at this temple is out of this World, it depicts life on Earth and some of the creatures that can be found here, a celebration of sorts, if we can’t replicate this today then how was it done thousands of years ago? It simply defies logical understanding
https://youtu.be/0mb7LCRqcss
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Few astronomical sights excite the imagination like the nearby stellar nursery known as the Orion Nebula. The Nebula's glowing gas surrounds hot young stars at the edge of an immense interstellar molecular cloud. Many of the filamentary structures visible in the featured image are actually shock waves - fronts where fast moving material encounters slow moving gas. The Orion Nebula spans about 40 light years and is located about 1500 light years away in the same spiral arm of our Galaxy as the Sun. The Great Nebula in Orion can be found with the unaided eye just below and to the left of the easily identifiable belt of three stars in the popular constellation Orion. The featured image, taken last month, shows a two-hour exposure of the nebula in three colors. The whole Orion Nebula cloud complex, which includes the Horsehead Nebula, will slowly disperse over the next 100,000 years.

M42: The Great Orion Nebula
Image Credit & Copyright: Francesco Battistella
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Some storms on Jupiter are quite complex. The swirling storm was captured late last month by the NASA's robotic Juno spacecraft currently orbiting the Solar System's largest planet. The featured image spans about 30,000 kilometers, making this storm system just about as wide as planet Earth. The disturbance rotates counter-clockwise and shows a cloud pattern that includes light-colored updrafts thought to be composed predominantly of ammonia ice. These light clouds are the highest up and even cast discernable shadows toward the right. Juno will continue to orbit and probe Jupiter over the next few years as it tries to return data that help us to better understand Jupiter's atmospheric water abundance and if the planet has a solid surface underneath these fascinating clouds.

Juno Spots a Complex Storm on Jupiter
Image Credit: NASA, JPL-Caltech, SwRI, MSSS; Processing: Gerald Eichstädt & Seán Doran
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Lynd Dark Nebula 1251
20x600" Canon 550D & TS Imaging Star71
Orion Atlas EQ-G Mount
Calibrated, stacked and processed with Pixinsight.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/astromet/38603740256/
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In December of 1972, Apollo 17 astronauts Eugene Cernan and Harrison Schmitt spent about 75 hours on the Moon in the Taurus-Littrow valley, while colleague Ronald Evans orbited overhead. This sharp image was taken by Cernan as he and Schmitt roamed the valley floor. The image shows Schmitt on the left with the lunar rover at the edge of Shorty Crater, near the spot where geologist Schmitt discovered orange lunar soil. The Apollo 17 crew returned with 110 kilograms of rock and soil samples, more than was returned from any of the other lunar landing sites. Forty five years later, Cernan and Schmitt are still the last to walk on the Moon.

Apollo 17 at Shorty Crater
Image Credit: Apollo 17 Crew, NASA
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Helix Nebula (NGC 7293). The next step of my project: OIII. Here a comparison of the same object, taken with OIII filter (left) and h-Alpha filter (right). Normally IMO the center of the Helix nebula (the "pupil") is turned to bluish tones. The correct assignment of the OIII line is emerald or even better viridian green. All photographs were taken in Tenerife at 1180 m above sea level in October and November 2017. h-alpha imaging total 36h, OIII imaging 20 h

Credit and Copyright:
Fritz Helmut Hemmerich
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“a messenger from afar arriving first.”
Pronounced - 'oh MOO-uh MOO-uh'
https://youtu.be/zjbYqF8tDmA
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Astronomers recently scrambled to observe an intriguing asteroid that zipped through the solar system on a steep trajectory from interstellar space—the first confirmed object from another star.
Now, new data reveal the interstellar interloper to be a rocky, cigar-shaped object with a somewhat reddish hue. The asteroid, named, Wait for it! - ‘Oumuamua’, is up to one-quarter mile long and highly-elongated—perhaps 10 times as long as it is wide. That aspect ratio is greater than that of any asteroid or comet observed in our solar system to date. While its elongated shape is quite surprising, and unlike asteroids seen in our solar system, it may provide new clues into how other solar systems formed.
Wait till you hear this
The observations and analyses were funded in part by NASA and appear in the Nov. 20 issue of the journal Nature. They suggest this unusual object had been wandering through the Milky Way, unattached to any star system for hundreds of millions of years before its chance encounter with our star system.
Immediately after its discovery, telescopes around the world, including Europes Very Large Telescope in Chile and other observatories around the world were called into action to measure the object’s orbit, brightness and colour. Urgency for viewing from ground-based telescopes was vital to get the best data.
Combining the images from the European telescope using four different filters with those of other large telescopes, a team of astronomers found that ‘Oumuamua’ varies in brightness by a factor of ten as it spins on its axis every 7.3 hours. No known asteroid or comet from our solar system varies so widely in brightness, with such a large ratio between length and width. The most elongated objects we have seen to date are no more than three times longer than they are wide.
These properties suggest that ‘Oumuamua’ is dense, comprised of rock and possibly metals,it has no water or ice, and that its surface was reddened due to the effects of irradiation from cosmic rays over hundreds of millions of years.
A few large ground-based telescopes continue to track the asteroid, though it’s rapidly fading as it recedes from our planet.
Observations from large ground-based telescopes will continue until the object becomes too faint to be detected probably sometime after mid-December. NASA’s Center for Near-Earth Object Studies continues to take all available tracking measurements to refine the trajectory as it exits our solar system.
Preliminary orbital calculations suggest that the object came from the approximate direction of the bright star Vega, in the northern constellation of Lyra. However, it took so long for the interstellar object to make the journey, even at the speed of about 59,000 miles per hour, that Vega was not near that position when the asteroid was there about 300,000 years ago.
The object has been classified as interstellar asteroid by the International Astronomical Union, which is responsible for granting official names to bodies in the solar system and beyond. In addition to the technical name, the Pan-STARRS team dubbed it ‘Oumuamua (oh MOO-uh MOO-uh), which is Hawaiian for “a messenger from afar arriving first.”
What do you guys think of the Interstellar visitor?
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"Now I have collected all h-Alpha for the Helix nebula, 36 h total exposure time (Single subframe exposure time between 90 sec unbinned for the center structures and 180 sec 2x2 bin for the faint environmental veils) with Hyperstar 14"/F1.9 with ASI 1600 and RASA 11"/F2.2 with ATIK 460, parallel mounted on a ASA DDM85. I am very happy how many structures of the environment are getting visible"

Credit and Copyright:
Fritz Helmut Hemmerich
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