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The time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time

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Noah Friedman

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Whoops.

I recently purchased a huge cabinet of thousands of watch parts which originally came from an estate sale. As I was going through the drawers I found a small tube of radium paint for watch hands and dials.

I've come across plenty of radium dials on vintage watches before, but never an actual source of the stuff. I got out my geiger counter and checked the box, tube, and drawer and sure enough they're all contaminated. The drawer interior's contamination is fairly localized and not much radiation escapes when it's closed. Probably not worth worrying about except for the primary material itself.

I don't have any good excuse for hanging onto this, but I also don't really want to transport it to a hazardous waste collection facility either.

I have no idea if this tube is even still any good, anyway. And while I'd be curious to experiment with restoring some old dials, there's also this persistent voice in the back of my head telling me not to be a fucking idiot.
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Glenn Copeland's profile photoEdward Morbius's profile photo
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My immediate thought is where one might apply small amounts of radium paint to best effect.
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Noah Friedman

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This is a Hamilton 974, made about 1910.  This was one of their more common models, but this one is slightly unusual in that it has gold-flashed screws and springs with yellow lettering; normally these are just steel-colored and the lettering is inked in black.  The model number is not marked on the movement; Hamilton didn't start marking these models until later production runs.

Hamilton made several variations of this model, including some that were lever-set and some that had various upgrades such as adjustment for positions and double rollers (actually later runs were all double-roller).  An example of one of the higher end variations is the Electric Railway Special, of which I have an example at https://plus.google.com/photos/105068366727758843481/albums/6158022577915439857

The "salesman" case is marked Hamilton on both the front and back near the pendant.  Judging by how often I see these on eBay they are not too uncommon, but I don't know who manufactured them.  I also have a couple of Illinois cases that are almost identical.
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Lovely.
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Noah Friedman

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This is the most 70s watch ever. Or at least, of the ones I have.

Like all Seiko 5 models this is automatic wind only (the crown will not manual wind) and the seconds hand does not "hack", or stop, when you set the time.

Unlike any other Seiko 5s I have, the day and date are advanced by pushing in the crown, either halfway or all the way, respectively. It only pulls out one stop to set the time.

Because the square case and rounded dial resembles a mid-20th century television, these models are often referred to as "TV" Seikos.
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Nice watch
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Noah Friedman

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This is one of those times (no pun intended¹) when I wish I could put a single post in two collections.

¹If it were, I'd want to add this to a third collection.
 
Muller’s new idea: Time is expanding because space is expanding.

“The new physics principle is that space and time are linked; when you create new space, you will create new time,” Muller said.

“Every moment, the universe gets a little bigger, and there is a little more time, and it is this leading edge of time that we refer to as now,” he writes. “The future does not yet exist … it is being created. Now is at the boundary, the shock front, the new time that is coming from nothing, the leading edge of time.”

His theory makes testable predictions, not so incidently.

h/t +rare avis 
Physicist Richard Muller proposes that time is created as space is created in the expanding universe
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Edward Mclaughlin's profile photoAnnette Reid's profile photo
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nw as
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Noah Friedman

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This is a slightly later G-Shock model, the 7th or 8th model, produced in 1987 which I think is about when I bought it. It's the classic model that the occasional retrospective and anniversary models that come out are usually based on.

The resin bezel has held up slightly better although part of it has broken off (it might be hard to see; it's the uppermost part near where the strap would connect). The surface of the resin is also sort of oily where it is disintegrating. I still have the original strap but I took it off for storage.

Like the previous one this is an all stainless steel case that will last virtually forever. It uses the same 10-year battery.
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albert j's profile photoIwan Ridhwan's profile photo
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Fake or real g shock 
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Noah Friedman

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Swatch Irony "Body & Soul" (YAS100G), introduced in the fall of 1997 though this one is a later production run.

Skeletonized ETA 2841-1 movement, 21 jewels, automatic wind. The pallet fork is blue plastic. In some later runs the escape wheel is plastic as well, but in this one it is still steel.
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Gregory P. Smith's profile photoNoah Friedman's profile photo
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They mostly made quartz watches but they also made several dozen automatic watches in the late 90s, plus the "Irony" line that had steel cases instead of plastic. I still have a couple of the plastic ones, but mainly one I made out of several others into a sort of minimalist design. I'll post that one later.

Today, Swatch's line of automatics is called "Sistem51", a movement made of just 51 parts and completely assembled by machine. Most movements still require some hand assembly and tuning. These are riveted together in such a way as to defy disassembly or servicing. If they break or wear out you're supposed to just replace them. Considering they're not really much cheaper than the lower finished ETA movements they used to use, I'm not impressed.
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Noah Friedman

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Have some clockmaking porn.
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Gert Sønderby's profile photoGlenn Copeland's profile photo
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+Gert Sønderby a buddy of mine is working on a LEGO version of the Antikythera Mechanism using a handful of custom gears. It's kind of amazing.
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Noah Friedman

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"Mr. Lincoln, are you snorting screws again?  You know they're a thread to your health."
 
The hairspring stud screw form this 6/0 size Elgin is in danger of being inhaled by President Lincoln.

Job number 160169...
#Elgin   #pocketwatch  
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.my new,. NC. Lol. Kjkfjjjfjkrk have just jealous just like just jealous kids just. Just keep. Just joined just keep just jealous. Just. Keep just jealous just jealous just kg just love. Have non. Just 
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Noah Friedman

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I like the texture and color contrasts on the Strela dial more, but the tachymeter is less useful than the 2nd time zone option of the Poljot (the outer ring can be rotated). You can't really see it in this photo, but the Strela's dial is textured with a concentric ring pattern.

They're functionally equivalent otherwise.  These both have a Poljot 31681 chronograph movement, which was based on the Valjoux 7734 and then refined somewhat.  (http://www.strela-watch.de/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/MakTime-Poljot-31681.jpg)  The backs on both are transparent.
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58%
42%
A. Стрела (Strela)
58%
B. Полет (Poljot)
42%
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Michael Alessio's profile photoYuri Savelich's profile photo
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The original real Стрела was solid gold, solid gold back. Original was produced with German equipment, taken as reparations, also some German watchmakers worked in Russia after the war, taken as prisoners.
https://plus.google.com/photos/...
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Noah Friedman

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A recent conversation on one of +Jeff C​'s threads with +makula​ inspired me to dig out some of my old Casio watches and photograph them.

This is a Casio G-Shock from the early 80s. In fact this is the third model they ever produced, starting in 1984 although I think I bought mine in 85 or 86. In the 30 years I've had it, it's run almost continuously and I've only changed the battery in it twice.

This watch originally had a black resin bezel, but over the years it became brittle and rotted away. This is fairly common for these watches of the time and if you look for ones of this vintage on ebay you'll find that most of them either have no bezel or they have been replaced with new aftermarket ones.

Newer G-Shocks are made with a resin polymer case and a stamped metal back held in by 4 screws. But originally they were built with entirely steel cases and a screwdown back. Inside the movement is surrounded by a foam-like cushion that helps to give it its name. But the outside was built like a tank. (The small bolts on the top and bottom were there to secure the bezel to the case.)

Model DW-5200C, with module (movement) 240.
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Jeff C's profile photoKamran Ansari's profile photo
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.ravi teja movi 
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