Post has attachment
We wish you all a very Happy Thanksgiving. We hope you all have a safe and joyous day with family and friends.

We give thanks for all of the amazing researchers who work tirelessly to advance the field of neuroscience, and to all of our supporters who have helped us to grow over the past 15 years. We also give thanks for our family and friends who have provided love, support and encouraged us to grow.

Happy Thanksgiving from our family at NeuroscienceNews.com to you and yours.
Photo

Post has attachment
No, Turkey Doesn't Make You Sleepy, But it May Bring More Trust to Your Thanksgiving Table

And where turkey is being eaten, there is inevitably talk of tryptophan – a naturally occurring chemical found in turkey and other foods. This building block of protein often takes the blame for eaters feeling sleepy soon after the Thanksgiving meal.

Post has attachment
Do Birdsong and Human Speech Share Biological Roots?

Scientists who study birdsong have been intrigued for some time by the possibility that human speech and music may be rooted in biological processes shared across a variety of animals. Now, research by McGill University biologists provides new evidence to support this idea.

The research is in Current Biology. (full access paywall)

Post has attachment
Whole Brain Map of Electrical Connections Key to Forming Memories

A team of neuroscientists at the University of Pennsylvania has constructed the first whole-brain map of electrical connectivity in the brain based on data from nearly 300 neurosurgical patients with electrodes implanted directly on the brain.

Post has attachment
Smarter People Have Better Connected Brains

Differences in intelligence have so far mostly been attributed to differences in specific brain regions. However, are smart people’s brains also wired differently to those of less intelligent persons? A new study published by researchers from Goethe University Frankfurt (Germany) supports this assumption. In intelligent persons, certain brain regions are more strongly involved in the flow of information between brain regions, while other brain regions are less engaged.

The research is in Scientific Reports. (full open access)

Post has attachment
Proton Pump Inhibitors For Digestive Problems Not Linked to Increased Dementia Risk

Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines commonly prescribed to treat acid-related digestive problems, including gastroesophageal reflux disease (or GERD). As of 2011, up to 1 in 5 older adults reported using a PPI. Although healthcare practitioners have long believed that PPIs are safe, recent studies have linked PPIs to potential risks, including fractures and kidney disease. Some studies also have linked PPIs to an increased risk for dementia among older adults. However, several experts have suggested that these studies may not correctly measure the connection.

The research is in Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. (full open access)

Post has attachment
Pitch Imperfect? How the Brain Decodes Pitch May Improve Cochlear Implants

Picture yourself with a friend in a crowded restaurant. The din of other diners, the clattering of dishes, the muffled notes of background music, the voice of your friend, not to mention your own – all compete for your brain’s attention.

The research is in Journal of Neuroscience. (full access paywall)

Post has attachment
What if Consciousness is Not What Drives the Human Mind?

Most experts think that consciousness can be divided into two parts: the experience of consciousness (or personal awareness), and the contents of consciousness, which include things such as thoughts, beliefs, sensations, perceptions, intentions, memories and emotions.

Post has attachment
High Intensity Exercise Boosts Memory

The health advantages of high-intensity exercise are widely known but new research from McMaster University points to another major benefit: better memory.

The research is in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience. (full access paywall)

Post has attachment
Early Stages of Dementia Reduce Human Face Memorization Ability

A Japanese research group has revealed that elderly people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) have a particularly weakened ability to memorize human faces in the short term when compared to healthy elderly people. MCI patients also had a different gaze behavior when trying to memorize a face. This research may lead to the early detection of dementia.

The research is in Scientific Reports. (full open access)
Wait while more posts are being loaded