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These new pictures of Jupiter are AMAZING! The intricacy of the storm vortices is mesmerizing.
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It's easy to forget that our view of the Moon with all of the maria is special. The far side of the moon is much plainer looking.

More info: https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap130916.html
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This is a superb description of the landing process for the NASA space shuttle. So cool! Pretty concise considering the amount of info conveyed. And the final video from inside the cockpit is fascinating.
This is such a beautifully done talk — and slide deck, to use a very broad definition of the term. Not just for space nerds.
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Many of you will not agree with me, but I think this is one of +Ethan Siegel 's best articles ever. He covers so many important concepts in one short article. The binding-energy-per-nucleon flatness is something I never realized before, it it explains so well why everything isn't just iron. Also, the idea that the silicon-fusion phase is so short (mere hours before supernova after a million-year buildup!) is mind-blowing.
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The excellent charts in this blog post capture the most surprising feature of the total solar eclipse last week. We sense light logarithmically, so it didn't seem to get really dark until the last moments of the eclipse.
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Based on these new occultation observations, team members say MU69 may not be not a lone spherical object, but suspect it could be an “extreme prolate spheroid” – think of a skinny football – or even a binary pair. The odd shape has scientists thinking two bodies may be orbiting very close together or even touching – what’s known as a close or contact binary – or perhaps they’re observing a single body with a large chunk taken out of it. The size of MU69 or its components also can be determined from these data. It appears to be no more than 20 miles (30 kilometers) long, or, if a binary, each about 9-12 miles (15-20 kilometers) in diameter.

h/t John Nolan
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This is indeed surprising. And it makes any understanding of human biology via genetic analysis so much more complicated.
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This article doesn't really delve into how synthetic-aperture, long-baseline interferometry telescopes work but the science that they're trying to do is really cool. I'm really looking forward to seeing the results of this work, which (as Brian suggests in comments) might be publicized in some modest number of months from now.
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Cool! This is a well-known technique for detecting atmospheres of objects outside our solar system, but this is the first time it's been used for an object so small (40% bigger diameter than our Earth).
Breaking: Atmosphere around super-Earth detected!

Gliese 1132 b is 1.6 Earth Masses, orbiting red dwarf GJ 1132 and is located only approximately 39 light years away!

"Astronomers have detected an atmosphere around the super-Earth GJ 1132b. This marks the first detection of an atmosphere around an Earth-like planet other than Earth itself, and thus a significant step on the path towards the detection of life on an exoplanet. The team, which includes researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, used the 2.2 m ESO/MPG telescope in Chile to take images of the planet's host star GJ 1132, and measuring the slight decrease in brightness as the planet and its atmosphere absorbed some of the starlight while passing directly in front of their host star."

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-04-atmosphere-super-earth.html

The Study: John Southworth et al. Detection of the Atmosphere of the 1.6Exoplanet GJ 1132 b, The Astronomical Journal (2017). https://arxiv.org/abs/1612.02425
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