Post has attachment
Canadian glaciers now major contributor to sea level change, UCI study shows

Ice loss from Canada’s Arctic glaciers has transformed them into a major contributor to sea level change, new research by University of California, Irvine glaciologists has found. From 2005 to 2015, surface melt off ice caps and glaciers of the Queen Elizabeth Islands grew by an astonishing 900 percent, from an average of three gigatons to 30 gigatons per year, according to results published today in the journal Environmental Research Letters.

The team found that in the past decade, overall ice mass declined markedly, turning the region into a major contributor to sea level change. Canada holds 25 percent of all Arctic ice, second only to Greenland.

Full story here:
https://news.uci.edu/research/canadian-glaciers-now-major-contributor-to-sea-level-change-uci-study-shows/

Check out NASA's Global Climate Change Vital Signs of the Planet website with lots of information on global climate change:
http://climate.nasa.gov/

This NASA Earth Observatory article on global warming is answering some of the most asked questions:
http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Features/GlobalWarming/

Image credit: Canada’s glaciers and ice caps are now a major contributor to sea level change, a new UCI study shows. Ten times more ice is melting annually due to warmer temperatures. Seen here is the edge of the Barnes Ice Cap in May 2015. NASA / John Sonntag

Thank you for your interest in this Climate Change/Earth collection. Maybe add me on Google+ (+Pierre Markuse) and Twitter (https://twitter.com/Pierre_Markuse) or have a look at the Astronomy/Astrophysics collection here: https://goo.gl/x0zPAJ or the Space/Space Technology collection here: https://goo.gl/5KP0wx

#science #earth #glacier #canada #climate #climatechange #golbalwarming #sealevelrise #arctic #arcticice #glacialmelt
Photo

Post has attachment
NASA, NOAA Data Show 2016 Warmest Year on Record Globally

Earth's 2016 surface temperatures were the warmest since modern recordkeeping began in 1880, according to independent analyses by NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Globally-averaged temperatures in 2016 were 1.78 degrees Fahrenheit (0.99 degrees Celsius) warmer than the mid-20th century mean. This makes 2016 the third year in a row to set a new record for global average surface temperatures.

“2016 is remarkably the third record year in a row in this series,” said GISS Director Gavin Schmidt. “We don't expect record years every year, but the ongoing long-term warming trend is clear.”

More information here:
https://www.giss.nasa.gov/research/news/20170118/

NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies:
http://www.giss.nasa.gov/

Video: NASA's Analysis of 2016 Global Temperature
https://youtu.be/s3RWTTtPg8E

Check out NASA's Global Climate Change Vital Signs of the Planet website with lots of information on global climate change:
http://climate.nasa.gov/

This NASA Earth Observatory article on global warming is answering some of the most asked questions:
http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Features/GlobalWarming/

Image credit: The planet's long-term warming trend is seen in this chart of every year's annual temperature cycle from 1880 to the present, compared to the average temperature from 1880 to 2015. Record warm years are listed in the column on the right. NASA / Earth Observatory (http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/) / Joshua Stevens (https://twitter.com/jscarto)

Thank you for your interest in this Climate Change/Earth collection. Maybe add me on Google+ (+Pierre Markuse) and Twitter (https://twitter.com/Pierre_Markuse) or have a look at the Astronomy/Astrophysics collection here: https://goo.gl/x0zPAJ or the Space/Space Technology collection here: https://goo.gl/5KP0wx

#science #earth #climate #climatechange #globalwarming #globaltemperature #nasa #noaa #temperatureanomaly #giss
Animated Photo

Post has attachment
Newly discovered phytoplankton groups appear to favor warmer oceans

An international research team has discovered two phytoplankton groups -- unlike any known species -- in climate-sensitive areas around the world. While they appear relatively rare compared to other phytoplankton (https://goo.gl/0LT4e8), scientists say their prevalence in warm waters suggests they could be important in future ocean ecosystems.

The findings, published January 9th in Current Biology, traced the phytoplankton genes to their potential ancient origins and matched them with sequences in around 200 contemporary samples. The new phytoplankton groups were increasingly abundant in warmer, low-nutrient surface waters at sites including the Sargasso Sea (https://goo.gl/O65S5j), Bay of Bengal (https://goo.gl/HEkf8m) and North Pacific Gyre (https://goo.gl/Bk0Btc).

Full story here:
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/01/170109133945.htm

Take a look at this massive phytoplankton bloom in the Barents Sea:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/+PierreMarkuse/posts/HQ15Qfaukf9

Image credit: Phytoplankton NOAA MESA Project https://goo.gl/pCOFM0

Thank you for your interest in this Climate Change/Earth collection. Maybe add me on Google+ (+Pierre Markuse) and Twitter (https://twitter.com/Pierre_Markuse) or have a look at the Astronomy/Astrophysics collection here: https://goo.gl/x0zPAJ or the Space/Space Technology collection here: https://goo.gl/5KP0wx

#science #earth #oceans #phytoplankton #globalwarming #climatechange #biology #marinecosystem
Photo

Post has attachment
Glaciers + Bonus Ice Cap

I usually post images from Earth observation satellites (https://goo.gl/REmnUX) in my Space/Space Technology collection, but I figured that some of my followers of this Climate Change / Earth collection here might enjoy the view of a few glaciers and an ice cap.

If you like those images, processed from data taken by the Landsat (https://goo.gl/whVRTQ) and Sentinel (https://goo.gl/P2bRoG) satellites, you should follow my Space/Space Technology collection (https://goo.gl/5KP0wx) as well as my Flickr (https://www.flickr.com/photos/pierre_markuse/), with even more images.

I also occasionally tweet about topics relevant to this collection, so in case you just can't get enough you can follow me on Twitter here:
https://twitter.com/Pierre_Markuse

The images in this post

For some images I have an article on G+ linked, you can find more information on those images when you click the link.

1. Columbia Glacier, Alaska, USA
https://plus.google.com/u/0/+PierreMarkuse/posts/5LBMuiGEAnf

2. Wolverine Glacier, Kenai Mountains, Alaska, USA
https://plus.google.com/u/0/+PierreMarkuse/posts/RyNTu1PTtQ2

3. South Cascade Glacier, Washington, USA

4. Gulkana Glacier, Alaska, USA
https://plus.google.com/u/0/+PierreMarkuse/posts/7j7tVb9FcXp

5. Elephant Foot Glacier, Romer Lake, Greenland
https://plus.google.com/u/0/+PierreMarkuse/posts/3dY68EdBREg

6. Barnes Ice Cap, Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada

Image credit:
[1, 2, 4, 6] Landsat 8 data courtesy of U.S. Geological Survey, Processed by +Pierre Markuse
[3, 5] Contains modified Copernicus Sentinel Data [2016], Processed by +Pierre Markuse

#sciene #earth #eos #remotesensing #landsat #sentinel #copernicus #glacier #icecap #photography #alaska #greendland #canada #usa
PhotoPhotoPhotoPhotoPhoto
1/4/17
6 Photos - View album

Post has attachment
Unprecedented Arctic warmth in 2016 triggers massive decline in sea ice, snow

A new NOAA-sponsored report shows that unprecedented warming air temperature in 2016 over the Arctic contributed to a record-breaking delay in the fall sea ice freeze-up, leading to extensive melting of Greenland ice sheet and land-based snow cover.

Now in its 11th year, the Arctic Report Card, released today at the annual American Geophysical Union fall meeting in San Francisco, is a peer-reviewed report that brings together the work of 61 scientists from 11 nations who report on air, ocean, land and ecosystem changes. It is a key tool used around the world to track changes in the Arctic and how those changes may affect communities, businesses and people.

Read the full article here:
http://www.noaa.gov/media-release/unprecedented-arctic-warmth-in-2016-triggers-massive-decline-in-sea-ice-snow

Take a look at the Arctic Report Card 2016 here:
http://www.arctic.noaa.gov/Report-Card/Report-Card-2016

Video: Arctic Report Card 2016
https://youtu.be/G0rp6-BEur8

More information on the loss of Arctic sea ice:
https://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews/2016/09/2016-ties-with-2007-for-second-lowest-arctic-sea-ice-minimum/
http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=89223
http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Features/SeaIce/

Image credit: (map) Temperatures across the Arctic from October 2015-September 2016 compared to the 1981-2010 average. (graph) Yearly temperatures since 1900 compared to the 1981-2010 average for the Arctic (orange line) and the globe (gray). NOAA Climate.gov map based on NCEP reanalysis data from NOAA's Earth System Research Lab. Graph adapted from Figure 1.1 in the 2016 Arctic Report Card. https://goo.gl/8UKFpP

Thank you for your interest in this Climate Change/Earth collection. Maybe add me on Google+ (+Pierre Markuse) and Twitter (https://twitter.com/Pierre_Markuse) or have a look at the Astronomy/Astrophysics collection here: https://goo.gl/x0zPAJ or the Space/Space Technology collection here: https://goo.gl/5KP0wx

#science #earth #climate #climatechange #arctic #arcticreportcard #arcticreportcard2016 #globalwarming #seaice #seaicedecline #arcticseaice #noaa
Photo

Post has attachment
The climate-changing desert dust fertilising our oceans

The way in which man-made acids in the atmosphere interact with the dust that nourishes our oceans has been quantified by scientists for the first time. In an international study led by the University of Leeds, researchers have pinpointed how much phosphate “fertiliser” is released from dust depending on atmospheric acid levels.

Most of the phosphorus from desert dust comes in the form of apatite (https://goo.gl/fZcGaj), a group of phosphate minerals. Acids in the atmoshpere (burning of fossil fuels is currently the most significant source of atmospheric acids) can dissolve the mineral and make the phosphorus available to phytoplankton (https://goo.gl/0LT4e8) and diatoms (https://goo.gl/VmQAoL) in the oceans.

In a next step scientists now need to gauge the effects of more phosphorus being available as fertiliser in the oceans on marine ecosystems and Earth’s climate.

Read the full article here:
https://www.leeds.ac.uk/news/article/3951/the_climate-changing_desert_dust_fertilising_our_oceans

Where to start when looking for information on climate change?

Check out NASA's Global Climate Change Vital Signs of the Planet website with lots of information on global climate change:
http://climate.nasa.gov/

Image credit: Saharan dust over the Atlantic Ocean Animation Suomi NPP VIIRS images, accessed through NASA Worldview (https://worldview.earthdata.nasa.gov/) / Processed by +Pierre Markuse https://goo.gl/mGO8sW

Events like the one in the animation are very common and Saharan (https://goo.gl/odXxDe) dust not only gets carried into the ocean but even reaches the Amazon River Basin (https://goo.gl/Rfo0a7) in South America, each year about 50 million tons of Saharan dust are providing important nutrients for the rainforest soils. Half of that amount is coming from a single location, the Bodélé Depression (https://goo.gl/P1dyox) at the southern edge of the Sahara Desert in north central Africa, the lowest point in Chad.

Thank you for your interest in this Climate Change/Earth collection. Maybe add me on Google+ (+Pierre Markuse) and Twitter (https://twitter.com/Pierre_Markuse) or have a look at the Astronomy/Astrophysics collection here: https://goo.gl/x0zPAJ or the Space/Space Technology collection here: https://goo.gl/5KP0wx

#science #earth #phosphorus #oceans #climate #climatechange #fertilizer #desert #apatite #fossilfuels #sahara #dust #marineecosysstem 
Animated Photo

Post has attachment
U.S. had its warmest autumn and 2nd warmest November on record

The contiguous U.S. average November temperature was 48.0°F, which was 6.3°F above the 20th century average. This was the second warmest November in the 122-year period of record, behind November 1999 (48.1°F).

The contiguous U.S. average temperature for September-November was 57.6°F, 4.1°F above the 20th century average, the warmest autumn period on record for the second consecutive year. The previous record from 2015 was 56.8°F. For the contiguous U.S., both minimum (nighttime) temperatures and maximum (daytime) temperatures were warmest on record for autumn.

Full report here:
https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/summary-info/national/201611

Where to start when looking for information on climate change?

Check out NASA's Global Climate Change Vital Signs of the Planet website with lots of information on global climate change:
http://climate.nasa.gov/

Image credit: Mean Temperature Departures from Average September-November 2016 NOAA https://goo.gl/dVqQ3s

Thank you for your interest in this Climate Change/Earth collection. Maybe add me on Google+ (+Pierre Markuse) and Twitter (https://twitter.com/Pierre_Markuse) or have a look at the Astronomy/Astrophysics collection here: https://goo.gl/x0zPAJ or the Space/Space Technology collection here: https://goo.gl/5KP0wx

#science #earth #usa #unitedstates #globalwarming #climatechange #climate #noaa #climaterecords #meantemperature
Photo

Post has attachment
Growing Pains: Arctic Sea Ice at Record Lows

Every northern fall and winter, cooling ocean and air temperatures cause the floating cap of Arctic sea ice to grow from its annual minimum extent toward a maximum between February and April. So far in 2016, though, the Arctic Ocean and neighboring seas have been slow to freeze, setting both daily and monthly record lows.

“The October freeze-up was very slow and that continued through much of November,” said Walt Meier, a sea ice scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center.

Read the full article here:
http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=89223

Also read this Earth Observatory article on sea ice:
http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Features/SeaIce/

More information:
https://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews/2016/09/2016-ties-with-2007-for-second-lowest-arctic-sea-ice-minimum/

Check out NASA's Global Climate Change Vital Signs of the Planet website with lots of information on global climate change:
http://climate.nasa.gov/

Image credit: NASA Earth Observatory image by Joshua Stevens, using data from the National Snow and Ice Data Center https://goo.gl/h5WTTD

Thank you for your interest in this Climate Change/Earth collection. Maybe add me on Google+ (+Pierre Markuse) and Twitter (https://twitter.com/Pierre_Markuse) or have a look at the Astronomy/Astrophysics collection here: https://goo.gl/x0zPAJ or the Space/Space Technology collection here: https://goo.gl/5KP0wx

#science #earth #arctic #seaice #arcticseaice #globalwarming #climatechange #climate #nasa #nsidc
Animated Photo

Post has attachment
Drought in the Southeast: How 12 Reservoirs Have Shrunk Since the Last Year

Take a look at these compelling images of 12 reservoirs, showing the effects of the ongoing drought in the southeastern US. The “before” picture for each slide is from October or November of last year, while the “after” picture is from November 2016.

See the images here:
http://www.lakepedia.com/blog/how-reservoirs-in-the-southeast-have-shrunk.html

You may also want to take a look at the United States Drought Monitor for more information:
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/

Even more information here at the NOAA State of the Climate Report:
https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/drought/201610

Check out NASA's Global Climate Change Vital Signs of the Planet website with lots of information on global climate change:
http://climate.nasa.gov/

#science #earth #climatechange #globalwarming #drought #us #climate #reservoir #water #landsat

Post has attachment
Large forest die-offs can have effects that ricochet to distant ecosystems

Major forest die-offs due to drought, heat and beetle infestations or deforestation could have consequences far beyond the local landscape. Wiping out an entire forest can have significant effects on global climate patterns and alter vegetation on the other side of the world, according to a study led by the University of Washington and published November 16 in PLOS ONE.

“When trees die in one place, it can be good or bad for plants elsewhere, because it causes changes in one place that can ricochet to shift climate in another place,” said lead author Elizabeth Garcia, a UW postdoctoral researcher in atmospheric sciences. “The atmosphere provides the connection.”

Read the full story here:
http://www.washington.edu/news/2016/11/16/large-forest-die-offs-can-have-effects-that-ricochet-to-distant-ecosystems/

Check out NASA's Global Climate Change Vital Signs of the Planet website with lots of information on global climate change:
http://climate.nasa.gov/

Image credit: Lake Cachuma (https://goo.gl/x1aTih) in southern California in October 2013 and October 2016. Clearly visible is the declining surface area (and therefore water capacity) of the reservoir due to the ongoing drought in California NASA Earth Observatory images by Joshua Stevens, using data from the U.S. Geological Survey https://goo.gl/Jr6en0 / Edited by +Pierre Markuse / Read more on the Californian drought here:
http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=89110

Thank you for your interest in this Climate Change/Earth collection. Maybe add me on Google+ (+Pierre Markuse) and Twitter (https://twitter.com/Pierre_Markuse) or have a look at the Astronomy/Astrophysics collection here: https://goo.gl/x0zPAJ or the Space/Space Technology collection here: https://goo.gl/5KP0wx

#science #earth #climatechange #globalwarming #forests #deforestation #drought #climate
Photo
Wait while more posts are being loaded