Post has shared content
Why Race Is Not a Thing, According to Genetics. Adam Rutherford: "In many ways, genetics makes a mockery of race. The characteristics of normal human variation we use to determine broad social categories of race—such as black, Asian, or white—are mostly things like skin color, morphological features, or hair texture, and those are all biologically encoded.

But when we look at the full genomes from people all over the world, those differences represent a tiny fraction of the differences between people. There is, for instance, more genetic diversity within Africa than in the rest of the world put together. If you take someone from Ethiopia and someone from the Sudan, they are more likely to be more genetically different from each other than either one of those people is to anyone else on the planet!" http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/10/genetics-history-race-neanderthal-rutherford/
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
The European Revolutions of 1848
"Following on from the defeat of Napoleon which brought a French Revolutionary and Napoleonic period of turmoil which had lasted from 1789-1815 to a close, the conservatively inclined alliance of powers that had been ranged against him attempted to re-impose the sovereign powers of Monarchies and Empires."
"These powers held Congresses to discuss the affairs of Europe and to orchestrate mutual efforts to maintain monarchical sovereignty."
After 1820 there were many instances of "constitutional-liberal" political upheaval on varying scales, in Spain and on the Italian Peninsula (resulting in counter-interventions by conservative / reactionary powers), in Russia, in Poland (national-constitutional-liberal and suppressed by Russian intervention), and in France.
"Perhaps the most dramatically transforming of these upheavals being that in France where an illiberal "Legitimist" King of France was deposed and replaced by an "Orléanist" cousin who undertook to rule more liberally as "King of the French" in 1830.

"European states as then traditionally organised, in addition to constitutionalism, liberalism and nationalism, also faced challenges from an increase in population creating more demands for foodstuffs, housing and employment. Such industrialisation as had begun to occur had sometimes impacted seriously on established craft industries bringing about significant displacement into unemployment. Many young persons from middle class backgrounds finished their years of education or training and emerged into an economic situation that was unwelcoming to their skills.
Levels of payment for both urban and rural workers tended to fall leaving many persons in a situation where they could hope to survive, health permitting and quite possibly in over-crowded and unsanitary conditions, but found it almost impossible to actually prosper.
Moreover, there was then no such thing as any system of social security in place to cater to the needs of those unlucky enough to fall on hard times through unemployment, illness or injury - or their dependants.

"The revolutions of 1848-1849, (sometimes referred to in the German lands as the Völkerfrühling or the Springtime of Peoples), can perhaps be seen as a particularly active phase in the challenge populist claims to political power had intermittently been making against the authority traditionally exercised by the dynastic governments of Europe.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Mysterious disk found in Ancient Greek Antikythera shipwreck
"Bronze limbs, a sarcophagus lid, marble statue pieces, and a mysterious bronze disk were among the remains located during excavations of one of the world’s most ancient—and famous—shipwrecks, according to the following report by the Greek Observer.While the statues would likely have been evaluated as high art in their day, perhaps the most intriguing artifact found is a small, bronze disk. Punctuated with holes and decorated with the image of a bull, it’s unclear what the disk was used for, said Simossi."
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Genome-wide data from a 40,000-year-old man in China reveals complicated
genetic history of Asia
"The biological makeup of humans in East Asia is shaping up to be a very complex story, with greater diversity and more distant contacts than previously known, according to a new study in Current Biologyanalyzing the genome of a man that died in the Tianyuan Cave near Beijing, China 40,000 years ago. His bones had enough DNA molecules left that a team led by Professor FU Qiaomei, at the Molecular Paleontology Lab at the Chinese Academy of Sciences Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP), could use advanced ancient DNA sequencing techniques to retrieve DNA from him that spans the human genome."
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
Now, #ancient #DNA suggests that living #Greeks are indeed the descendants of #Mycenaeans, with only a small proportion of DNA from later migrations to #Greece. And the Mycenaeans themselves were closely related to the earlier #Minoans, the study reveals, another great civilization that flourished on the island of Crete from 2600 B.C.E. to 1400 B.C.E. (named for the mythical King Minos).
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
Add a comment...

Post has shared content
New Clues to How Neanderthal Genes Affect Your Health
"A genome from a female found in Croatia shows how conditions from schizophrenia to arthritis are influenced by our ancient human cousins."
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Colosseum's upper level to reopen after four decades
"For the first time in four decades, the Colosseum's fifth and highest level will reopen to the public on November 1 - offering visitors a magnificent view of the amphitheater and Rome."
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded