Post has attachment
Could Blockchain Technology be a Boon for the Music Industry?

Knowing more about this revolutionary technology is essential since it is supposed to do wonders in fixing the problems of transparency in the music industry.

Well, blockchain is a basic solution for setting up a certain ‘distributed ledger’ on the basis of a particular software that can make safe and confirmed transactions without concerning an actual authority. With the blockchain technology, transactions happening between peer-to-peer networks are kept recorded. Information blocks of the transaction data are validated by the cryptographic method in this particular technology.

Blockchain enables the musicians to publish their content directly on the ledger with just a simple and unique ID. This ultimately solves various problems for the artist they can easily keep their records safe from being copied or modified. Every part of the content is stored in a certain meta-data with serial ownership rights for everyone to look at. It ensures the fact that the deserving people will be paid for the content.

Another way that the blockchain technology helps the artists is that it basically changes the monetization of the music content. Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies that are blockchain-based are supportive of the micropayments which usher in a new era of offering the on-demand services of music. With the help of this, users are now able to reward the deserving stakeholders after they select a particular content.

See http://bit.ly/2hM0n4j
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
The Loog Pro allows children to shred their faces off and/or shout the devil

The Loog Pro is a guitar made just for kids and features three strings that can be tuned in various open tunings for easy playing. The original Loog guitar was an acoustic marvel, small enough for a toddler but enough versatile for older players. This new Pro model, which costs $199 online, basically cleans up the concept and offers a very playable and light instrument for kids who want to rock out.

Each guitar includes a little pack of cards to learn songs and chords and there are plenty of online resources for beginning players.

See http://tcrn.ch/2hv4n9f
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Use Google Assistant Like Shazam to Identify Songs

We’ve all been using Shazam for years to figure out what song is playing at our local bar. Now you can get the same experience right in Google. This week Google added a new music lookup feature to Google Assistant (it’s been in Google Now for a bit). With it you can say “Hey Google, what song is this?” and get information about whatever might be playing around you.

See http://bit.ly/2jkSF1a
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Why it's always worth re-evaluating your online streaming music service

Just like short-term insurance you do not have any long-term investment value to lose from a music streaming service. You pay per month for the service and lose nothing when switching services, apart from setting up your playlists again.

So it is worth taking stock once in a while of what you are getting versus other services, and compare it to your own unique requirements.

I have some older non-mainstream music, and this is something I check for on a streaming service to see whether they have it. Sometimes they have it, but it gets pulled off as usage rights change. So a possible solution is uploading it myself and knowing it is always there and integrated with my streaming music. That changes slightly what I'm looking for then on the streaming services catalogue of music.

Whilst I love Spotify it is not available yet in South Africa, so I have to use a VPN to listen and that makes moving between devices a bit of a challenge. So Google Play Music is available in South Africa and this makes it more practical for me. But if you live in a country where Spotify (and other services) are available, your options are different. We have another quite cheap streaming music service within South Africa but I can't upload my music to it, so I'm at the mercy of usage rights changes which happen fairly often.

And of course apart from size and extent of the catalogue, whether you can upload or not, whether the service will sync across devices and play offline, there are various other considerations around the player features as well as what devices of yours are supported. I always prefer a service that works across different platforms and is not locked into their own devices or OS, and thankfully even iTunes now mostly works across the different platforms.

Services also change so it is worth not getting stuck in a rut and having a relook at the options you have. Of course, one way to get locked into a specific service is if you buy albums or tracks within that service instead of subscribing monthly....

Read the main article at https://lifehacker.com/getting-a-new-google-home-here-s-why-you-should-ditch-1819153231 where some differences are highlighted specifically between Google Play Music and Spotify
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
The Jammy is a steel string guitar that fits in a pocket

Designed to be played like a regular guitar, you fret on the top part of the neck and strum the strings on the bottom half. Because it has only five frets you change the octave by pulling the neck out from 0 to the full length of 12 inches.

Design house RnD64 created the Jammy and will be shipping it later this year. There’s no pricing and the website features a vague promise of a special price if you leave your email address, which suggests this is a bit of a fishing expedition.

See http://tcrn.ch/2fggBOC
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
You Can Now Record Studio-Quality Songs On The Go

Spire Studio for iOS devices is a portable, wireless, professional-quality recording studio designed to keep you in the creative zone. Use the Spire Studio’s built-in Wi-Fi network to pair with the Spire app, and start recording, editing, mixing, and sharing your music with the world. More on how it actually works at http://www.spire.live/content/spire/en/how-it-works.html.

See http://bit.ly/2xsxfFm
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Brain Composer: 'Thinking' melodies onto a musical score

Under the title of "Brain Composer", a group led by BCI expert Gernot Müller-Putz from TU Graz's Institute of Neural Engineering shows that experiences of quite a different tone can be sounded from the keys of brain-computer interfaces. Derived from an established BCI method which mainly serves to spell - more accurately - write by means of BCI, the team has developed a new application by which music can be composed and transferred onto a musical score - just through the power of thought. All you need is a special cap which measures brain waves, the adapted BCI, a software for composing music, and of course a bit of musical knowledge.

The basic principle of the BCI method used, which is called P300, can be briefly described: various options, such as letters or notes, pauses, chords, etc. flash by one after the other in a table. If you're trained and can focus on the desired option while it lights up, you cause a minute change in your brain waves. The BCI recognises this change and draws conclusions about the chosen option.

The short video "Sheet Music by Mind" gives an impression of composing music using BCI: https://www.tugraz.at/institute/ine/research/videos/

See http://bit.ly/2gXYc9p
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
The Music Industry Bands Together To Finally Get Paid Online... Using Blockchain

The "information gap" refers to the data around who helped create a song. Publishers might keep track of who wrote the underlying composition of a song, or the session drummer on a recording, but that information doesn't always show up in a digital file's metadata. This disconnect between the person who composed a song, the person who recorded it, and the subsequent plays, has led to problems like writers and artists not getting paid for their work, and publishers suing streaming companies as they struggle to identify who is owed royalties. “It’s a simple question of attribution,” says Panay. “And payments follow attribution.”

Over the last year, members of the OMI — almost 200 organizations in total — have worked to develop just that. As a first step, they’ve created an API that companies can voluntarily build into their systems to help identify key data points like the names of musicians and composers, plus how many times and where tracks are played. This information is then stored on a decentralized database using blockchain technology — which means no one owns the information, but everyone can access it.

See http://bit.ly/2gYI4Vd
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Spotify launching in South Africa?

Spotify plans to launch in South Africa during 2017, industry sources have told MyBroadband. The service previously investigated launching in South Africa in 2014, but decided not to proceed.

A recent posting of a Senior Editor/Music Programmer job advert for South Africa by the company has also added to speculation it will be available soon.

A key feature of Spotify is its free service supported by ads.

See https://mybroadband.co.za/news/general/228499-spotify-launching-in-south-africa-source.html
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
The MusixMatch Desktop Lyrics App Is Available for Linux

If you used to use the Spotify lyrics feature you will already be familiar with Musixmatch’s main USP: synchronized lyrics.

With a single click, you could see lyrics scroll up the screen in sync with the playing song, perfect for both impromptu desk-based karaoke sessions to well-known classic, as well as learning lyrics to new tracks by your favourite artists.

Another click lets you view full lyrics as a static, scrollable page.

Sadly Spotify removed lyrics functionality from all of its apps last year, as its deal with lyrics database Musixmatch came to an end. Spotify says it plans to make ‘improvements’ to its lyrics support in the future, but over a year on we’re yet to hear so much as squeak about the how and when.

But the Musixmatch app fills the lyrical void in the meantime — and it works well on Linux. A desktop Musixmatch app launched on Windows and mac app earlier this year.

See http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2017/08/musixmatch-desktop-app-on-linux

Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded