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The Humble Bundle has gone Telltale again, this time with a decidedly Lucasfilm-esque content - you can grab season 1 and 2 of Sam & Max in the $1 package!

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Telltale Games' Tales of Monkey Island is still on sale at GOG.com - if you never played those but love Monkey Island, you won't be disappointed!

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I just read that Usborne Publishing has released five more of their classic vintage computer programming books - they're not exactly prime learning material nowadays, but I love to read those nevertheless. Scroll down on the linked page for the free PDF downloads!

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Jimmy Maher, the Digital Antiquarian, has written a fascinating article about the development of Railroad Tycoon!

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This is not exactly Vintage Gaming, but poking around Youtube recently I found this fascinating talk by Sid Meier - he comes over a bit holier-than-though, but he does have a lot of good points.

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Railroad Tycoon was, and is, perhaps my most favourite Amiga game next to Civilization. It was the first one I ever bought for the Amiga and while my original box looks a bit banged up, there are still all the goodies in there. As someone who was playing a lot with model trains as a child, this was an awesome game-simulation and not too complex to become boring after a while. The Amiga version is still my favourite because of its more colourful graphics, but the later Deluxe version on the PC was not bad either. The two sequels, made without Sid Meier's involvement, were not that exciting, though - but somehow I really love the 2006 Railroads!, which reminds me of the Amiga version the most

Railroad Tycoon Deluxe is available for free, no strings attached, here: http://www.2kgames.com/railroads/downloads.html - but it's the highres version that looks different than the original. It's still fun to play, though!
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2/26/17
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Civilization II was released five years after the original and for the first time the isometric view was used - and it was also the first one that came on a CD with lots of sounds and animation. Just for fun, here's my old Civ II box and a screenshot I made after installing the game under Windows 7 - which is still able to run it! Nowadays, it looks somewhat bland and unexciting, but back then it was utterly amazing. Not pictured: the huge 200-page manual and a big poster with the development and research paths. You really got something substantial back then for your money!
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2/25/17
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Civilization - This is where it all started back in 1991. The photo of the disks and the box are actually of the PC version, but like the Amiga conversion it came on five double-density 3.5" floppy disks (720kb on the PC, 880kb on the Amiga) and on both computers you could of course also install it on a hard drive. I spent countless hours playing it on the Amiga and later on the PC and from time to time I even fire the original up on my Android tablet, on which it runs quite comfortably with a DOS emulator! There is nothing like Civilization in glorious 320x200 pixels.

My previous Amiga Games article also contains a short section with some more comments about Civilization, you can read it here:
blog.bibra-online.de/2015/12/23/vintage-computing-amiga-games/
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2/23/17
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Whenever I hear about Sid Meier's Civilization, I have to think about the first time I played the original on the Amiga all those years ago. This Humble Bundle doesn't go back to the very first game, but you can get both Civ III (which I consider the best of the bunch) and IV for $1, V for about $8 and Beyond Earth in addition for the full $15 package! Not a bad offer at all if you like the older Civilization incarnations.

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Amiga Expansions IV - Here's a bit of a curiosity I had to dig up first, so there was a bit of a delay: the Aegis SoundMaster audio sampler! Because the Amiga itself had no audio input, there was external hardware necessary if you wanted to record sound - and this is where products like the SoundMaster came in. It's basically an 8-bit 22 kHz sound sampler, although it supposedly is able to sample at up to 56 kHz, which you would actually not be able to play back on a stock Amiga.

It had both line-in and microphone inputs and even a small onboard microphone - it was basic, but it actually sounded surprisingly good given the sample rate limitations. The AudioMaster editor was simple by today's standards too, but it did the job and you could even make instruments for Aegis Sonix with this package, which I frequently did!
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2/18/17
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