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Largo di Torre Argentina
Yet another pit full of information from the distant past... Rome was built on its history, literally. There are so many ruins and reliques everywhere as well as unexplored archeological potential under most roads and houses; it can feel a bit dizzy and probably be frustrating for some as well.
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10/15/17
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A fairly common view in Rome with buildings rarely higher than six stories. A tiny bit less common is that church in the back as Rome must be a paradise for them, for obvious reasons. A lot less common is that entrance gate

Here we are situated nearby the Vatican so the entire area relates to it one way or another. An embassy or some governmental agencies might have caused the gate, or protecting those rare parking spaces. Gush how Italian love their cars and, having had to rely on the public buses, deep down I can feel some understanding.
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The Roman Forum
Here is a view of a vast excavated area consisting of Roman temples, squares and government buildings, some dating back 2,000 years. It was partially already shaded when we got there; something I intend to 'fix' with a follow-up trip, I hope next year.

And here is also a link to the wonderful combined 3D work of Google Maps engineers and, I strongly suppose, an army of benevolents: https://goo.gl/maps/nFM3YfYuRg12,

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_Forum,
❝The Roman Forum, also known by its Latin name Forum Romanum (Italian: Foro Romano), is a rectangular forum (plaza) surrounded by the ruins of several important ancient government buildings at the center of the city of Rome. Citizens of the ancient city referred to this space, originally a marketplace, as the Forum Magnum, or simply the Forum.

For centuries the Forum was the center of day-to-day life in Rome: the site of triumphal processions and elections; the venue for public speeches, criminal trials, and gladiatorial matches; and the nucleus of commercial affairs. Here statues and monuments commemorated the city's great men. The teeming heart of ancient Rome, it has been called the most celebrated meeting place in the world, and in all history.

Located in the small valley between the Palatine and Capitoline Hills, the Forum today is a sprawling ruin of architectural fragments and intermittent archaeological excavations attracting 4.5 million sightseers yearly.

Many of the oldest and most important structures of the ancient city were located on or near the Forum. The Roman Kingdom's earliest shrines and temples were located on the southeastern edge. These included the ancient former royal residence, the Regia (8th century BC), and the Temple of Vesta (7th century BC), as well as the surrounding complex of the Vestal Virgins, all of which were rebuilt after the rise of imperial Rome.

Other archaic shrines to the northwest, such as the Umbilicus Urbis and the Vulcanal (Shrine of Vulcan), developed into the Republic's formal Comitium (assembly area). This is where the Senate—as well as Republican government itself—began. The Senate House, government offices, tribunals, temples, memorials and statues gradually cluttered the area.

Over time the archaic Comitium was replaced by the larger adjacent Forum and the focus of judicial activity moved to the new Basilica Aemilia (179 BC). Some 130 years later, Julius Caesar built the Basilica Julia, along with the new Curia Julia, refocusing both the judicial offices and the Senate itself. This new Forum, in what proved to be its final form, then served as a revitalized city square where the people of Rome could gather for commercial, political, judicial and religious pursuits in ever greater numbers.

Eventually much economic and judicial business would transfer away from the Forum Romanum to the larger and more extravagant structures (Trajan's Forum and the Basilica Ulpia) to the north. The reign of Constantine the Great saw the construction of the last major expansion of the Forum complex—the Basilica of Maxentius (312 AD). This returned the political center to the Forum until the fall of the Western Roman Empire almost two centuries later.❞
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10/27/17
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Sant'Anselmo
If you search for "churches" over of the city of Rome using Google Maps you will (today) obtain a list of 277 distinct geographic results. The Sant'Anselmo church is the particular one which happens to be a stone throw away from the Aventine place of my previous post, luckily for me in need of something more enticing than a keyhole, like this lovely and quiet inner courtyard.

A good friend of mine and also a lover of Rome told me that this is what makes that city so different. Every few steps you take will bring you something unexpected.
Rome - October 13rd, 2017.
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10/25/17
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Aventine Keyhole
Our tour guide thought we all would like to queue to wait and look at the Saint Peter’s Basilica through a tiny Keyhole but that wasn't how I had pictured myself using the Segway so, while the group was waiting to see what I had anyway planned to visit later that same week, I instead wheeled around looking here and there.
Rome - October 13rd, 2017.
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10/23/17
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Imperial Rome
Here is a panorama which Google made me automatically. Over the next few days I will make my own, manually and based on better source images. I was on the best possible viewpoint, standing on the Palatine Hill, to appreciate what Imperial Rome must have looked like.

On my last afternoon in Rome I walked back from the Termini train station to the ancient city. I was in explorer mode so it took me over an hour, probably less than 30 minutes otherwise. In consideration of famous landmarks Rome isn't as big as London or Paris.

I walked past the Colosseum which I already visited earlier this week and about which I shall come back later. Being onsite after 15h30, I didn't have any queue to bother about, great thing! But then the race against the sunset began, this place is huge to cover it all. I couldn't so I will have to come back; I am writing this from the train, back home in Switzerland.
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Roman Roads
The road going from the Coliseum to the Forum, if not directly from the Roman era, has been restored with those same large and dark stones of volcanic origin.

It turns walking into the likes of hiking a mountainous river bed as one has to watch out before every step, a bit of a disadvantage when one came here to look at everything but your steps.

On the left side of the last picture the metallic fence protects an ongoing archeological dig where about 10 persons where busy working yesterday morning.
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10/17/17
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No queue to enter the Vatican because it is closed at night
In normal days, when nothing special is going on, the very heart of the Catholic World will only get as empty as on this picture at night or when it rains.

I saw many queues today and thus as many reasons for impatient-me to skip, which I also did. Fortunately Rome is also full of interesting things where no-one needs queuing.
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Rome is not the cleanest city I have ever seen but inside its churches, tidiness rules. I will later share full size images from that particular one and this is a foretaste.
http://www.santamariadegliangeliroma.it
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Segway in Rome
My daughter turned 16 last month and this happened to be the lower limit to ride a Segway in Italy as well so I thought this would make up for a nice birthday gift.

There are a handful of companies providing such a service in Rome and the one I used had a fully functional and useful website with all possible answers, so it went like molten butter on a piece of bread, but I feel not qualified to recommend it over the other ones.

In the end I might have enjoyed it even more than her as I had a blast, what a great and gentle way to discover a new city. These machines are fully matured and in less than 1 hour I already felt I had ridden one all my life so this enabled me to drive and snap a few pictures and videoclips (upcoming) at the same time, in full confidence.

From an historical science perspective it might not be the best experience out there for me as I was too busy enjoying my ride than where we were and, when we stopped, I was already looking forward for the next Segway leg.
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14/10/2017
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