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A piece of gold on a leaf
(A young Golden Frog from Agumbe, Western Ghats)
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Up-close with a Bicoloured Frog. These frogs can virtually disappear into their usual habitat of leaf litter - from the top they appear like nothing but a dry leaf. Their camouflage also gives them the confidence to be approached really close. I photographed this with an extension tube to get the details of the beautiful eye.
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Stealth mode...out in the open! This Malabar Pit Viper was a surprise that evening near Agumbe. It was waiting for its prey on a plank of wood, on the boundary of a well. Why was it a surprise?

Well, that morning we had used that very same wooden plank as support as we searched inside the well for signs of life. And we'd found another Pit Viper sitting on a log leaning into the well. All the while, this one was probably resting at striking distance - in one of the crevices of the plank, where we found her next morning!

Yet another reminder of how important it is to scan every bit of the support you use in a rainforest.
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Want a big hug?

A large scorpion (Heterometrus sp.) waits at the entrance to it lair. We came across this one on a night walk in the rainforests of Agumbe.

Did you know that scorpions glow in UV light?
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The beautiful Malabar Torrent Dart (Euphaea fraseri) - a very colourful damselfly that is found close to the streams in the Western Ghats. I photographed this in Agumbe last week.

It's a challenge to illuminate Damselflies with a flash as the colours can look very unnatural. Here, I spent time with the insect till it settled down on this fern. I put up my tripod gently and photographed it with my macro lens to capture the natural colours.

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A Signature Spider enjoys its meal calmly in the rainforests of Agumbe. Signature spiders build webs in the gaps between trees, shrubs or branches and wait for their prey to fly in. The spiders are usually form an X (as in the photograph) and many webs bear a signature zig-zag pattern beyond the legs giving them their common name.
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An Amboli Bush Frog calling in the rainforests near Agumbe

With the first rains, the rainforest is filled with the the calls of frogs looking for mates. Calls coming from everywhere - bushes, tree-tops, water and even the forest floor. It's a symphony that always takes my breath away...and it only happens for a few months every year when the monsoon is at its peak.

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Lizards are very very mesmerizing too!

Boulenger’s Indian Gecko (Geckoella albofasciatus) is fairly common in and around the Sharavathi Adventure Camp at Jog. Active at night, the gecko has beautiful yellow bands (juveniles have white bands) running along its body.
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Shining green in the rainforest. Came across this Nilgiri Forest Lizard (Calotes nemoricola) - a lifer - by a stream during one of the walks in Agumbe over the weekend. Easily the species of the tour for me!

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A warm and enthusiastic welcome by a forest crab to its rainforest home. Ever since - for 8 years now - the rainforest of Agumbe has been like a second home to me. A place where I find peace and inspiration.

This was on one of my first few rainforest trips where I was just carrying a kit lens along with the camera. With a borrowed battery, I captured a couple of frames of this beautiful crab. The wet ground, falling raindrops and climbing leeches didn't seem to matter at all! 
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