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Tabby's Star, or KIC 8462852 may have a massive ringed planet orbiting it, and the rings are tilted, that might explain the extreme dimming. This is according to a model from Astronomers from the University of Valencia and the University of Cantabria. If the model is accurate, we should expect another dimming event in 2021.


http://www.sciencealert.com/astronomers-have-a-new-explanation-for-the-alien-megastructure-star
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KIC 8462852 (Tabby's star, the one that some speculated had a Dyson sphere or similar megastructure) is dimming again: http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/05/star-spurred-alien-theories-dims-again
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Are the Dyson rings around pulsars detectable?

Georgian physicist Z. Osmanov calculates how far out we could reliably look for Dyson rings around pulsars. They estimate 0.2 kpc or 200 parsecs.

https://arxiv.org/pdf/1705.04142.pdf
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A Nearby Galactic Empire?

http://www.seti.org/seti-institute/Nearby-Galactic-Empire
By Seth Shostak, Senior Astronomer

"In addition, the opportunities for life in the Trappist 1 system make our own solar system look fourth-rate. Life might not spring up on all seven of these worlds, but if just one of them spawned biology, collisions with small asteroids could spread that infection to the other worlds in short order. And if even a single planet eventually produced technically competent beings, that species could quickly disperse its kind to all the rest. "
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Astronomer Douglas Vakoch wants to send a message to Proxima Centauri b, the closest exoplanet http://www.astronomy.com/news/2016/12/contact-with-proxmina-centauri-b

The main benefit to this target is that it's 4.2 light years away, so if there are aliens there, and they respond right away, we could get a response as early as mid-2025.
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Galactic Club, or Galactic Cliques? Exploring the limits of interstellar hegemony and the Zoo Hypothesis

Duncan H Forgan
(Submitted on 31 Aug 2016)

The Zoo solution to Fermi's Paradox proposes that extraterrestrial intelligences (ETIs) have agreed to not contact the Earth. The strength of this solution depends on the ability for ETIs to come to agreement, and establish/police treaties as part of a so-called "Galactic Club". These activities are principally limited by the causal connectivity of a civilisation to its neighbours at its inception, i.e. whether it comes to prominence being aware of other ETIs and any treaties or agreements in place.
If even one civilisation is not causally connected to the other members of a treaty, then they are free to operate beyond it and contact the Earth if wished, which makes the Zoo solution "soft". We should therefore consider how likely this scenario is, as this will give us a sense of the Zoo solution's softness, or general validity.
We implement a simple toy model of ETIs arising in a Galactic Habitable Zone, and calculate the properties of the groups of culturally connected civilisations established therein. We show that for most choices of civilisation parameters, the number of culturally connected groups is greater than 1, meaning that the Galaxy is composed of multiple Galactic Cliques rather than a single Galactic Club. We find in our models for a single Galactic Club to establish interstellar hegemony, the number of civilisations must be relatively large, the mean civilisation lifetime must be several millions of years, and the inter-arrival time between civilisations must be a few million years or less.

https://arxiv.org/abs/1608.08770
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Russian astronomers detect signal from HD 164585, a star about 95 light years away http://www.seti.org/seti-institute/a-seti-signal
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