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Would you like to enjoy some information about Jordan? You´re welcome to visit my collection from Jordan.
Hope you enjoy it!
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Temenos Gate

Another example of Nabataean architecture. The gate used to separate the busy part of the town with shops from the sacred one.
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After walking through very dry and vast desert areas, I was delighted to find flowers blooming in that soil. I couldn´t help myself, but register that moment!
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Beautiful nature treasures.

Jordan´s natural treasures include Dana Biosphere Reserve, Azraq Wetland Reserve, Shaumari Wildlife Reserve, Mujib Biosphere Reserve, Dibeen Forest Reserve, Ajloun Forest Reserve, as well as the recently established Yarmouk Nature Reserve.
This photo has been taken inside Kerak Castle, Jordan.
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By Mati Milstein
Literally carved directly into vibrant red, white, pink, and sandstone cliff faces, the prehistoric Jordanian city of Petra was "lost" to the Western world for hundreds of years.

Located amid rugged desert canyons and mountains in what is now the southwestern corner of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, Petra was once a thriving trading center and the capital of the Nabataean empire between 400 B.C. and A.D. 106.

The city sat empty and in near ruin for centuries. Only in the early 1800s did a European traveler disguise himself in Bedouin costume and infiltrate the mysterious locale.

In 1985, the Petra Archaeological Park was declared a UNESCO World Heritage site, and in 2007 it was named one of the new seven wonders of the world.

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Ray of light in Kerak Castle, Jordan.
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This is the Crusader castle in which resided Reynald-de-Chatillon (also known as Arnat), one of the worst enemies of the Muslims during the Crusades. It was taken by Salahuddin Ayyubi on the second attempt in 1189 CE.

In 1183 Salahuddin besieged the castle, the siege taking place during the marriage of Humphrey IV of Toron and Isabella of Jerusalem. Lady Stephanie (the wife of Reynald) sent plates of food to the Muslim army beyond the walls. In response, while his men were trying to bridge the moat and catapulting rocks against the walls, Salahuddin enquired which tower the newly weds were occupying. As an act of chivalry, Salahuddin ordered his army not to bombard the tower and direct their fire elsewhere. The siege was eventually relieved by King Baldwin IV.
Despite a truce between the Crusaders and Muslims, in 1186 Reynald attacked a caravan travelling between Cairo and Damascus. In the ensuing hostilities, Reynald launched ships on the Red Sea, partly for piracy, but partly as a threat against Makkah and Madinah, challenging Islam in its own holy places. His pirates ravaged villages up and down the Red Sea, before being captured by the army of Al-Adil only a few miles from Madinah and subsequently beheaded.
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One of the Middle East's most scenic and ancient routes, the 280km-long highway is often overlooked in favour of the modern Desert Highway, which marches through Jordan's flat and sandy core in a speedy three and a half hours from the capital, Amman. Driving this alternative road to the famous red-tinged ruins may take longer, but this road's history stretches back to the curtain opening of civilisation.
The origin of the road's regal name is said to stem back to a league of kings who advanced this way to wage war with the wicked Cities of the Plains -- the Old Testament cities of Sodom and Gomorrah -- which are thought to have lain along the Dead Sea. Whether this was the inaugural event that handed this byway a royal nod or not, the King's Highway has since forged itself into the history books as a vital corridor for all who came after. The Nabataeans, who built their capital at Petra, travelled along this road in the 4th and 3rd Centuries BC as they built up their trading prowess; the Romans recognised its importance and made it part of their Empirical master route, the Via Nova Traiana, in the early years of the 2nd Century, and Hajj pilgrims throughout the Islamic world followed its path for centuries on their journey to Mecca.
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One of the Middle East's most scenic and ancient roads, the 280km-long King’s Highway in Jordan has a history that stretches back to the curtain opening of civilisation.
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