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Resting Comedians Sergey Yurievich Sudeikin
Sergey Yurievich Sudeikin, (19 March 1882 in Smolensk – 12 August 1946 in Nyack, New York), was a Russian artist and set-designer associated with the Ballets Russes and the Metropolitan Opera.
Was banned from the Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture for "obscene drawings". Sudeikin joined the Mir Iskusstva movement. Close friends included the poet Mikhail Kuzmin and the impresario Serge Diaghilev. In 1907-1918, he was married to actress Olga Glebova (1885–1945), and the closest friend of Anna Akhmatova. Glebova-Sudeikina is the principal character and addressee of Akhmatova's longest work, The Poem Without Hero (1940–65).
Sudeikin designed the sets and costumes for Diaghilev's production of La tragédie de Salomé by Florent Schmitt in 1913, and assisted in Nicholas Roerich's designs for Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring the same year.
In 1926 he prepared artwork for the 1926 Broadway production of Nikolai Evreinov's The Chief Thing. Soudeikine later designed the settings for the original Theatre Guild production of Porgy and Bess that first opened on Broadway at the Alvin Theatre in New York City on October 10, 1935.

www.thefairgroundbooth.com
#russiantheatre #theatre #art #Sudeikin
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The Russian Theatre Film Series - New Book published by Michael Craig and Copernicus Films. A complementary account of the entire series so far
+Russian Theatre Documentary Series
#theatre #Russiantheatre
copernicusfilms.com
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The Russian Theatre Film Series - New book publication
This post first appeared on my blog but it is worth repeating to reach a different audience here. This book is the third by Michael Craig. The first being Journey to Ogasawara   which was an account of the making of the film David Burliuk and the Japanese Av...
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The book - "The Russian Theatre Film Series - A filmmakers chronicle" will be out shortly. It is a hybrid account of how this documentary series was made, interspersed with information about content of the series, Russian theatre, thoughts on film-making from the perspective of working in Moscow as well and why figures like Meyerhold, Stanislavsky and Vakhtangov are such a significant force in Russia and theatre and world theatre. It is a kind of prelude or a clearing to or a clearing of a path towards future work in series. A marker to future developments. This book sums up how far the series has come, where it is now and how it will maybe develop in the future.

+Russian Theatre Documentary Series #theatre #russiantheatre
#meyerhold #stanislavsky #Vakhtangov
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3/21/17
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The Fairground Booth Book (untitled as yet)
Finishing one of the most difficult chapters of thefairgroundbooth.com and researching the film simultaneously. The chapter concerns Blok and Meyerhold’s legacy and in particular the legacy of The Fairground Booth in Russian and world theatrical history. This is a difficult subject to tackle as it is all a question of interpretation and quite subjective although I have tried to use referenced argument to get my point across. However this is not the main thing to consider since the purpose of the book is to be an introduction to The Fairground Booth rather than a definitive interpretation so the approach has to be looser and maybe even a bit experimental to find a way into the material.

There is not much material to go on and very little can be found on this play and on Russian theatre generally so I have to rely on my own judgement. What happens is that The Fairground Booth is referenced and mentioned in various works, often in passing. Its never occurred to anybody that The Fairground Booth was a major turning point in Russian and world theatrical history.It didn’t exactly turn Stanislavsky’s method on its head but Blok and Meyerhold’s little “balagan” certainly brought down Stanislavsky’s fourth wall. The book will explore not just the play itself but the background and context in which the play was received and will be part of +Russian Theatre Documentary Series
thefairgroundbooth.com
#thefairgroundbooth
#russiantheatre
#theatre
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Blok and The eternal feminine
As I prepare more work for The Fairground Booth, (editing the film and writing the book simultaneously) there are a few thoughts that are worth sharing about Blok's ideas on the eternal Feminine or the idea of Sophia. Blok developed such ideas in his poetry from the philosophical and literary environment in which he was living in Russia at the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the twentieth. The idea of the eternal feminine was proposed by Vladimir Solovyov a Russian thinker and poet. His Russian religious philosophy had a very strong impact on the Russian Symbolist art movements of his time and moreover on Blok's early development as a poet.His teachings on Sophia, conceived as a merciful unifying feminine wisdom akin to a world soul.
Blok developed these ideas in his early cycle of poems called The Beautiful Lady. In this cycle of poems he expressed many of his metaphysical ideas about the role of the feminine and his ideals of the redemptive power of beauty and art with neo platonic overtones.

Later he wrote The Stranger which involved an encounter with a mysterious woman who is seated in a cafe in one of the more urban parts of St Petersburg, grimy and far away from the fashionable parades of Nevsky and the centre. The woman no longer embodies the lofty ideals of The Beautiful Lady. She has a mystical inaccessible quality, darker, less benign, expressing an ambiguous opaque allure which contradicts some of Blok's previous assumptions and ideals about beauty. There is present a whiff of disharmony and the grotesque which Blok seemingly does not wish to dispel by becoming acquainted with her.

The image is later developed in the poem The Twelve. The long poem exhibits "mood-creating sounds, polyphonic rhythms", and the harsh slang of the streets. It describes the march of twelve Bolshevik guardsmen (similar to the Twelve Apostles of Christ) making their way through the streets of revolutionary Petrograd, with a fierce winter blizzard raging around them. The soldiers are cruel and traipse through the streets like fallen angels and disregard the normal civilities of an earlier time and represent a sweeping apocalyptic change which is underlined by the fierce blizzard. The female characters are treated with cruel disdain and the guardsmen are indifferent to death their own or other. Katya, one of the female characters is murdered by her ex lover Petka and is described as a chubby Russian beauty far from the elegance and refinement of the Beautiful Lady and even The Stranger. here there is a genealogical connection between Katya, The Beautiful Lady and The Stranger but also more importantly a connection with the Fairground Booth with Columbine who seems to embody all of the characteristics of these three, the ideal, the grotesque, the mystical and the prostitute.

At the end of the play an apparition of Christ appears leading the guardsmen through the streets, a feminine apparition or at least neither male nor female, wearing instead of a crown of thorns a crown of white roses.This incongruous image shocked many at the time and no less Blok who felt extremely uncomfortable about it but could not deny the image which had come before him.

+Russian Theatre Documentary Series +Michael Craig and Copernicus Films #russiantheatre #theatre #Blok
http://michaelcraig.copernicusfilms.com
http://thefairgroundbooth.com
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