Post has attachment
Thinly sliced (leftover) tri-tip is divine.
PhotoPhotoPhoto
12/9/17
3 Photos - View album
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
26 Tri-tip roasts, 104 chicken breasts, and 6 pork bellies went on the smoker / grill yesterday for the annual gymnastics fundraiser. 300 people were expected; about 235 attended.

The pork bellies went first in the smoker for a couple of hours, covering every square inch of available space. After a nice bark had formed they were covered and cooked on the gas grill side (indirect) at 275° with butter, brown sugar, and honey. About thirty minutes before serving, the cubes were covered in a BBQ glaze (BBQ sauce base, appleple juice, hot sauce) and put back on the smoker to caramelize. The end result was magnificent and the hit of the evening; the entire batch lasted about 30 minutes.

As soon as the bellies came off, the tri-tips went on the smoker at 250°. Slathered with spicy mustard and Montreal steak seasoning, the roasts were mopped with butter water every thirty minutes until the internal temperature reached 120°. 26 steaks covered the entire cooking area with room for maybe 1-2 more. The steaks at the front (near the fire) cooked much faster and required constant moving and monitoring. The smaller roasts hit 120° after only 45 minutes requiring the fire to be lowered. After approximately 1.5 hours, the steaks were pulled from the smoker and reverse seared over a charcoal fire maintained at 350-400° until they temped at 140° (medium), after which they were wrapped and sent to the cooker to rest for 45 minutes. The roasts had excellent smoke flavor and were very tender, but they were a bit chewy. We had 4-5 steaks leftover.

The chicken breasts were butterflied and dusted with a honey-flavored seasoning and cooked over direct heat for approximately 15 minutes, turning frequently. A slight BBQ glaze was applied - which caramelized nicely. Once the breasts hit 150°, they were wrapped and sent to the warmer. Two batches and six volunteers were required to flip and monitor temps. The chicken was moist and flavorful...for chicken. Surprisingly, we ran out of chicken towards the end.
PhotoPhotoPhotoPhotoPhoto
12/9/17
5 Photos - View album
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Understanding how temperature AND time together make poultry safe is THE difference between regular and excellent chicken. As long as it rests for 9 minutes without dropping temperature, chicken pulled at 145° is as safe as chicken pulled at 165°.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Although I didn't get any photos, I did smoke a turkey and pork belly burnt ends for Thanksgiving. The 13.25 lb bird went in at 7:30am at 265° and cooked for 6 hours before I increased the temperature to 300° for the last hour. I pulled the meat when the breast IT hit 160° and let rest. Total cook time was 6.5 hours. The bird was injected with a chicken broth and butter mixture the night before and was basted every hour with a mixture of butter and white wine. Reviews were all positive.

My cousin also fried an 18 lb turkey for about one hour. It was tender, but somewhat flavorless. The process was very interesting! The oil took about thirty minutes to get to 325°.

We also smoked a 5.5lb turkey breast for about 4 hours. It wasn't injected and finished dry.

The pork belly burnt ends were the hit... again.
http://howtobbqright.com/2017/04/17/pork-belly-burnt-ends/

PhotoPhotoPhoto
11/24/17
3 Photos - View album
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Grilling helpers
Photo
Photo
10/15/17
2 Photos - View album
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Butterfly chicken with Montreal chicken and paprika (for color) rub. Flipped each side after approximately 4 minutes over a 300° fire and lightly brushed with BBQ sauce. Flipped again and let caramelize. Total grill time about 12-15 minutes. Chicken was moist and flavorful, but I may try slightly less rub next time. Oh, and the mason jar cap from Recap was a perfect way to dust the meat with spices.
PhotoPhotoPhotoPhotoPhoto
9/4/17
7 Photos - View album
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
A few photos from the recent Raider Red Meats KCBS BBQ competition held in Lubbock, TX. Although our cook went better than all prior cooks, we didn't place very well. And my poor camper ended up with electrical problems. Red Raider curse.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Sam's club had a special on these giant ribeye pork chops which were about 1" thick. I covered them with Tres Amigos pork rub and created a vinegar mop sauce (butter, apple cider vinegar, leftover rub, cayenne) which was applied every 30 minutes. After about 2 hours at 250, they came off looking very nice. Unfortunately, they were dry and not very tasty at all. I think this cut of meat would better be suited covered in a sauce and cooked in the oven. Meh.
PhotoPhotoPhotoPhoto
9/4/17
4 Photos - View album
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
My wife picked up a marinated, bacon-wrapped pork tenderloin from Sam's. Thinking this would be a rather quick cook, I set the Rec Tec at 235. Three hours and twenty minutes later, and only after bumping the temperature to 275, the tenderloin (finally) hit an internal temperature of 238 degrees and was pulled. It looked nice and was cooked correctly, but the packaged marinade ruined the taste completely; it was way too salty. Lesson learned...stay away from meat which has been packaged in marinade!
PhotoPhotoPhotoPhotoPhoto
9/4/17
5 Photos - View album
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
At the Raider Red Meats BBQ and Ribeye competition in Lubbock, TX.
Photo
PhotoPhotoPhoto
8/26/17
4 Photos - View album
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded