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The Ottoman Turkish Cemetery - Marsa, Malta
It was commissioned in 1873, by Sultan Abdűlaziz I or Abd Al-Aziz (1830-1876), the 32nd Sultan of the Ottoman Turkish Empire, who reigned between 25 June 1861 and 30 May 1876. He had commissioned the eminent Maltese architect Emmanuele Luigi Galizia (1830-1907) to design and built a new Muslim cemetery to replace an earlier one which stood along the old Via del Croce, limits of Spencer Hill, Marsa and needed to be relocated due to road works. Fresh from his earlier successes in designing the Ta’ Braxia and the Addolorata cemeteries, Galizia produced a superb interpretation of an exotic Oriental architecture, the first of its kind in Malta.
For his efforts in completing the Muslim cemetery, Galizia was bestowed by the Ottoman Sultan with the Order of Medjidie (fourth class), which was a prestigious military and knightly order of the Ottoman Empire.
The contemporary writer and artist, T.M.P. Duggan has referred to Galizia’s cemetery as “the Ottoman Taj Mahal.” He describes it as “the least known and certainly today the most important surviving nineteenth century Ottoman building to have been built beyond the borders of the Ottoman Sultanate, in the new Ottoman Islamic style.
This building is an architectural statement of great beauty, and also of boldness and authority.”
(text by architect Dr Conrad Thake)

#Malta #Marsa #cemetery #Turkish #Ottoman #architecture #night #nightphotography #placestosee #placestovisit #longexposure
#photo #building #stone #josephdebattista #google #photography #orient #EmmanueleLuigiGalizia
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St Nicholas Church - Siġġiewi, Malta
The baroque parish church, dedicated to Saint Nicholas was erected by the villagers of Siġġiewi who raised the necessary funds between the years 1676 to 1693. It was designed by the Maltese architect, Lorenzo Gafà but underwent some changes throughout the years. The portico and naves were added by Professor Nicola Żammit in the latter half of the 19th century.
A particular architecture feature of this church is that it has a double dome that means that the outer dome has another one under it which can be seen from inside the church!

#Malta #Siġġiewi #photooftheday #photo #sky #josephdebattista #google #googleplus #stnicholas #churchphotography #church #statue #travelphotography #travel #holiday #village #stnicholas #placestosee #placestovisit #architecture #stone
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The Door
(Side door of St Nicholas Church in Siggiewi, Malta)
A door is a moving mechanism used to block off and allow access to, an entrance to or within an enclosed space, such as a building, room or vehicle. Doors normally consist of one or two solid panels, with or without windows, that swing using hinges horizontally. These hinges are attached to the door's edge but there are also doors that slide, fold or spin. The main purpose of a door is to control physical access.

Doors may have an aesthetic purpose in creating an impression of what lies beyond; for example, keeping administrative and factory areas of a building separate. In less formal settings, doors may also be seen as a sign of the desire for privacy.
As a form of courtesy and civility, people often knock before opening a door and entering a room. Some doors even have designated "knockers."

Doors are often symbolically endowed with ritualistic purposes. For example, being granted access to a door, including the guarding or receiving of the key to that door, may have special significance.
Similarly, doors and doorways frequently appear in literature and the arts in metaphorical or allegorical context, often as a portent of change.
(text from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Door)

#Malta #Siggiewi #architecture #door #sculpture #stone #wood #entrance #josephdebattista #google #photos #photooftheday #photography
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Valletta - Malta
Valletta is the tiny capital of the Mediterranean island nation of Malta. The walled city was established in the 1500s on a peninsula by the Knights of St. John, a Roman Catholic order. It’s known for museums, palaces and grand churches. Baroque landmarks include St. John’s Co-Cathedral, whose opulent interior is home to the Caravaggio masterpiece "The Beheading of Saint John."

#Malta #Valletta #Mediterranean #architecture #fortress #fortifications #fishingrods #sea #panoramic #placestosee #placestovisit #history #people #fishing #josephdebattista #google #photos #photography
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War Memorial - Floriana, Malta
The War Memorial ( Maltese : Monument tal-Gwerra ) is a memorial obelisk in Floriana, Malta, which commemorates the dead of World War I and World War II. It was inaugurated on 11 November 1938 by Governor Charles Bonham-Carter to the memory of those killed in World War I, but in 1949 it was rededicated to those killed in both world wars. The monument was designed by Louis Naudi, who was influenced by Antonio Sciortino.

The monument is an obelisk in the form of a Latin cross, and it is built out of local globigerina limestone. It has four plaques showing the colonial badge of Malta and reproductions of a document issued by King George V in 1918 acknowledging Malta's role in World War I, the letter by which King George VI awarded the George Cross to Malta in 1942, and a 1943 scroll by President Franklin D. Roosevelt saluting Malta for its role in World War II.

The War Memorial is located on site where during the Order of St. John was used for public executions. It is close to the Malta Memorial which is dedicated to Commonwealth aircrew who died in World War II, and memorials to the Royal Malta Artillery and The King's Own Malta Regiment. It was originally positioned halfway between City Gate and Ġlormu Cassar Avenue, but was relocated during the realigning of St. Anne Street in 1954. The memorial was restored and the area around it landscaped in the early 2010s. An eternal flame was installed at this point.

The President and Prime Minister as well as other dignitaries lay wreathes at the monument at an annual remembrance ceremony. The memorial is scheduled as a Grade 1 national monument.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_Memorial_(Floriana)

#Malta #Floriana #military #monument #fire #flame #warmemorial #google #josephdebattista #joseph #tourist #placestosee #placestovisit #architecture
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Saluting Battery - Valletta, Malta
The Saluting Battery (Maltese: Batterija tas-Salut ) is an artillery battery in Valletta, Malta. It was constructed in the 16th century by the Order of Saint John, on or near the site of an Ottoman battery from the Great Siege of Malta. The battery forms the lower tier of St. Peter & Paul Bastion of the Valletta Land Front, located below the Upper Barrakka Gardens and overlooking Fort St. Angelo and the rest of the Grand Harbour.

The Saluting Battery was mainly used for firing ceremonial gun salutes and signals, but it also saw military use during the blockade of 1798–1800 and World War II. The battery remained an active military installation until its guns were removed by the British in 1954. It was restored and opened to the public in the early 21st century, and it is now equipped with eight working replicas of SBBL 32 pounders which fire gun signals daily at 1200 and 1600.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saluting_Battery_(Valletta)

#Malta #Valletta #salutingbattery #guns #military #soldiers #fire #smoke #tourist #google #josephdebattista #joseph #placestosee #placestovisit
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The 'Dgħajsa' a Maltese boat
A dgħajsa (Maltese pronunciation: [dɐɪsɐ], pl. dgħajjes [dɐɪjɛs]) is a traditional water taxi from Malta. The design of the dgħajsa, like that of another Maltese boat, the luzzu, possibly dates back to Phoenician times, although it was modified over time, especially during British rule in Malta.

The word dgħajsa refers to any boat in the Maltese language, so they are also known as dgħajsa tal-pass to distinguish them from other boats. The boat is commonly referred to as Maltese Dgħajsa. In English, the word is sometimes pluralized "dgħajsas".

Dgħajjes were mainly used in the area of the Grand Harbour, to carry passengers (origin of pass in the name dgħajsa tal-pass) and small baggage from ships to shore. It was usually propelled by one man standing, facing forward, and pushing on two oars. The high stem and stern pieces seem to be mainly ornamental but they are useful in handling the boat and in the boarding and disembarking of passengers. The decorative symbols vary from boat to boat.

A dgħajsa called St. Angelo which was built between 1950 and 1952 was commissioned by the Royal Navy and was used to ferry Princess Elizabeth from her ship to Fort St Angelo during one of her visits to Malta. This boat is still in use today and it was recently restored. Until the 1970s, there were about a thousand registered dgħajjes in Malta.

Dgħajjes are used daily as water taxis, from Birgu to Valletta. Today, only about 12 original dgħajjes survive, and they are used as a valuable means of transportation. Some of these have been motorized by diesel engines. The small number in existence is a result of the high maintenance costs and the fact that there are very few skilled carpenters who are capable of building these boats. The Koperattiva tal-Barklori is a co-operative of boat owners who try to preserve the few remaining dgħajsas. The oldest one still in existence is the Palomba, which was built over 150 years ago and has been restored.

A more modern version of the dgħajsa known as Dgħajsa tal-Midalji is used in the rowing regatta along with other traditional Maltese boats. The regatta is held on 31 March and 8 September of each year in the Grand Harbour. Two Maltese dgħajjes competed in the Great River Race of 2012.

The dgħajsa is one of the symbols of Malta and it appeared on the coat of arms of Malta from 1975 to 1988.
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dgħajsa

#Malta #Maltese #boat #tourist #tourism #sea #google #photo #josephdebattista #joseph #dgħajsa #Maltaviews #marina #traditional #places

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Azure Window - Dwejra, Gozo
The Azure Window also known as the Dwejra Window (Maltese: it-Tieqa tad-Dwejra), was a 28-metre-tall (92 ft) limestone natural arch on the island of Gozo in Malta. It was located in Dwejra Bay in the limits of San Lawrenz, close to the Inland Sea and the Fungus Rock.

The formation, which was created after two limestone sea caves collapsed, was very popular among scuba divers and one of Malta's major tourist attractions. The arch, together with other natural features in the area of Dwejra, is featured in a number of international films and other media representations.

From the early 2000s to late 2016, several parts of the arch broke away and fell into the sea, both by natural erosion and by irregular activities. Erosion of the pillar over the years led to its collapse during a storm on 8 March 2017.

The arch finally collapsed at around 08:40 UTC (09:40 local time) on 8 March 2017, after severe storms with gale force winds. The pillar which was supporting the arch collapsed, and the entire structure crashed down into the sea, with nothing remaining visible above sea level.
The collapse was reported in both local and international media, it also became the subject of many Internet memes on Maltese social media.
The Environment and Resources Authority called the collapse a major loss to Malta's natural heritage.
(text from Wikipedia) Photo taken on 28th June 2010

#Malta #Gozo #Dwejra #Azurewindow #photos #josephdebattista #tourist #google #googlephotos #nature
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Verdala Palace limits of Siġġiewi, Malta
Verdala Palace is a palace in the Buskett Gardens, limits of Siġġiewi, Malta. It was built in 1586 during the reign of Hugues Loubenx de Verdalle, and it now serves as the official summer residence of the President of Malta.
The site of Verdala Palace was originally occupied by a hunting lodge, which was built in the 1550s or 1560s during the reign of Grand Master Jean Parisot de Valette. The lodge was built in the Boschetto, a large semi-landscaped area that was used by knights of the Order of Saint John for game hunting. The hunting lodge was expanded into a palace in 1586, during the reign of Hugues Loubenx de Verdalle. It was further embellished in the 17th and 18th centuries, during the reigns of Giovanni Paolo Lascaris and António Manoel de Vilhena.
During the French blockade of 1798–1800, the palace served as a military prison for French soldiers captured by the Maltese or British. During British rule, it became a silk factory, but it was eventually abandoned and fell into a state of disrepair. Some repairs were undertaken during the governorship of Frederick Cavendish Ponsonby, and it was fully restored by Governor Sir William Reid in the 1850s. Prior to its restoration it was a temporal minor hospital between 1915 and 1916.
It subsequently became the official summer residency of the Governors of Malta. It was included on the Antiquities List of 1925. On the outbreak of World War II in 1939, works of art from the National Museum were stored at the palace for safekeeping. The palace was restored in 1982 and began to be used to host visiting heads of state.
(Wikipedia)

#Malta #Verdala #architecture #historical #Siggiewi #palace #stone #google #josephdebattista #placestosee #placestovisit #tourism #tourist #photography
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St. Mary Magdalene Chapel - Dingli, Malta
Saint Mary Magdalene Chapel is a Roman Catholic chapel in the limits of Dingli, Malta, dedicated to Mary Magdalene. It overlooks the Dingli Cliffs, and is therefore commonly known as ''il-kappella tal-irdum'' (chapel of the cliffs). The chapel was built in 1646 on the site of an earlier one which had existed since at least the 15th century. Its simple architecture is typical of Maltese wayside chapels.
The date of construction of the chapel is not known, but the oldest reference to the building was made in 1446. It is located on the Dingli Cliffs, far from the town itself, and it was used by farmers who lived in nearby farms. The chapel was in a state of disrepair by 1575, and it later collapsed. It was rebuilt in the 17th century, being reopened by Bishop Miguel Juan Balaguer Camarasa on 15 April 1646. The reconstruction is commemorated by a Latin inscription above its doorway.
St. Mary Magdalene Chapel has a simple design, typical of Maltese wayside chapels. It has a rectangular structure, with its façade containing a single doorway and a circular window. A Latin inscription is located just above the door, while a slab originally containing a coat of arms is located above the window. A small parvis (Maltese: zuntier) is located outside the church, and a railing is located nearby to protect visitors to the chapel from falling down the cliffs.
The church has an altar built of Maltese limestone. The altarpiece is The Risen Christ by Paul Camilleri Cauchi, depicting Jesus forgiving a penitent Mary Magdalene after his resurrection.
(text from Wikipedia)

#Malta #Dingli #cliffs #history #chapel #sunset #josephdebattista #tourists #tourism #placestosee #placestovisit #google #googlephotos #maltese #architecture #silhouette
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